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first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Share this: Community members share their perceptions of pregnancy and antenatal care and ideas for making visual aids more culturally relevant.While all of these influencers care about the baby’s health, they generally believe the woman’s health is secondary. Our research highlighted the critical need to help community members understand the link between antenatal care and a woman’s and baby’s health.Based on our discussions with community members, we realized the need to emphasize the link between a woman’s health and that of her baby.Co-creating pregnancy clubs with women and providersWhen designing the group antenatal care model in Kenya, as in Uganda, we wanted to ensure that it improved the pregnancy and birth experience of the women participants, while enhancing — not burdening — the workflow of the health care providers. As a result of these discussions, and building on our experience forming groups in Uganda, we engaged women and providers in the creation of the Lea Mimba pregnancy club in Kenya.A calendar contains a health record and useful visuals that help women to track their own and their baby’s health.We adapted the Uganda group antenatal care curriculum to comply with national standards and guidelines for maternal and newborn health while meeting the current World Health Organization recommendations of eight antenatal care contacts. We also incorporated elements of self-care where women participate in taking their weight and recording their blood pressure, and facilitators encouraged women to build relationships and meet with club members outside of group sessions. To support the group model, we collaborated with local midwives and health care staff to develop a package of implementation materials that can be adapted for use in other settings, including a training curriculum; health care provider job aids; visual and tactile materials; supervision and monitoring tools and community engagement tools.Posters, flyers, and aprons were designed to spark public interest in the Lea Mimba Club and its functions.We observed and requested feedback from women and providers who participated in mock pregnancy club sessions. Participants commented on their experiences engaging in or leading the sessions, their understanding of the health topics and the usefulness and relevance of the implementation materials. During these sessions, we noticed that some women were initially quiet, but they became more involved when health care providers told stories or invited participants to sing songs that convey health messages. Women passed around a ball to indicate their turn to speak, and at times, even asked for the ball.After these mock sessions, participants continued to talk about what they learned as they waited for their individual appointments with midwives. They agreed that it would be easiest to attend sessions on market days, and midwives recommended that sessions take place in the afternoon when clinics are less crowded. Midwives noted that the group format also saved them time, as they could share more advice and information than was possible during one-on-one antenatal care appointments. Based on these observations and comments from the mock session participants, we revised the session structure and accompanying materials.Health care providers review the Lea Mimba message scrolls and share their thoughts on the usefulness of these tools.Pregnancy clubs in sessionWe have started pregnancy clubs in six facilities in Kakamega County. Groups comprise eight to 10 women of similar gestational ages, and we emphasize that each club session is a confidential and safe space for women to talk about their pregnancies, even if they are not yet ready to declare their pregnancy to the community.As health facilities host pregnancy clubs, we will continue to engage community members in discussions on the importance of antenatal care for all women and babies and encourage them to refer women to their local Lea Mimba pregnancy club.To learn more about our work, visit msh.org and stay up to date with MSH by subscribing to our email series. Posted on August 22, 2018September 21, 2018By: Priyam Sharda, Design Research Lead for M4ID; Shafia Rashid, Senior Technical Advisor, Family Care International (FCI) Program of Management Sciences for HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)“For the first three months, the baby is just blood. There’s nothing there to take care of,” said one Kenyan father-to-be in Kakamega County, Western Kenya, where we were meeting with communities and health care providers to learn about their attitudes toward women’s health, pregnancy and care at health facilities.“A baby is a blessing from God,” said the mother-in-law of a pregnant woman during another community discussion. “He alone knows how it grows.”Using insights from these community discussions, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) worked with M4ID, a social impact design company specializing in development and health, to develop a group antenatal care model that meets the needs of young women, adolescent girls (ages 10–24), and health care providers. With support from the UK’s County Innovation Challenge Fund program, the Lea Mimba project (“take care of your pregnancy” in Swahili) used a human-centered design approach to adapt a successful pregnancy club model that MSH and M4ID developed in the Eastern Ugandan communities of Mbale and Bududa in 2016.center_img M4ID uses human-centered design to create solutions that address health and development challenges. Communities actively engage in each step of the process to ensure that solutions are culturally relevant and meet their needs.From traditional to group antenatal careStarting antenatal care early in pregnancy is critical for protecting the health and wellbeing of women and their babies, but in Western Kenya, only about 20% of pregnant women attend their first visit before the fourth month of pregnancy (DHS 2014). Through antenatal care visits, health care providers can detect and treat pregnancy-related complications, such as pre-eclampsia and anemia, before they become life-threatening. Antenatal care visits provide opportunities for health care providers to encourage women to deliver their babies with the help of skilled birth attendants and to promote breastfeeding and other healthy postnatal behaviors.However, traditional one-on-one antenatal care often does not meet women’s and adolescents’ needs for information, support and high-quality clinical care. In Kakamega County, women often must wake up around 7:00 AM to go to the clinic, only to spend most of their time there in the waiting room. During standard antenatal care visits, providers spend between 10 and 15 minutes with each woman, but adolescents and those who are pregnant for the first time may need additional time to learn and understand health information.In recent years, group care models have emerged in low-income countries as a promising approach to provide high-quality antenatal care and promote social support among women during pregnancy. Women go through pregnancy as a cohort, learning through discussion and building bonds with one other and their antenatal care providers.Community perceptions of pregnancy and health careWe asked community members, potential clients and providers how women experience pregnancy and health care in their communities and how providers deliver that care.Several barriers continue to disrupt women’s and adolescents’ access to care, including a lack of high-quality services and information, limited individual and community awareness and support and low male engagement. Several actors —including recently pregnant peers, midwives, community health volunteers, male partners and mothers-in-law— influence a woman’s decision to use antenatal care services. Peers are an important early source of information, as doctors and other authority figures are considered difficult to approach. Mothers-in-law might uphold traditional, cultural beliefs that prevent suggested behavior change, while male partners provide the money or transportation to visit the clinic. We learned that pregnancy is only socially acknowledged toward the end of the second trimester, which deters women from going a health facility early in their pregnancy. Listen to the Lea Mimba Pregnancy Club Song: Lea Mimba Club participants sing a song with the message that healthy pregnancies ensure children’s health. Recording by M4ID.Photo credit: M4ID—This post originally appeared on Medium.Read more about group antenatal care>>last_img

first_imgIn 1995, Sara Horowtiz, having recognized in the decline of traditional labor unions a shift in the workforce, was looking for the “next form of unionism.â€? It turned out she had to invent it. She founded Working Today, the parent organization of Freelancers Union, where she continues to serve as Executive Director.Born in Brooklyn, New York, Sara comes from a long line of labor advocates. Her father was a labor lawyer, and her grandfather was vice president of the International Ladies’ Garment Workers Union. Sara’s family history led her to Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations, where she was awarded its labor prize. She later earned a law degree cum laude from the SUNY Buffalo Law School and a master’s degree from Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. Before founding Freelancers Union, Sara was a labor attorney in private practice and a union organizer with 1199, the National Health and Human Service Employees Union. Before that, she was a public defender in New York City. Sara remains passionate about helping independent workers find ways to help each other, and looks to the history of the labor movement for lessons that we can apply today. She’ll be authoring a series of blog entries on lessons from labor history, in the hope that others will find figures such as Sidney Hillman as inspiring as she has. Sara Horowitz lives in Brooklyn with her husband and daughter.last_img

first_imgThis is a post from a member of the Freelancers Union community. If you’re interested in sharing your expertise, your story, or some advice you think will help a fellow freelancer out, feel free to send your blog post to us here.If I had to define my character, I’d say I’m pretty optimistic. I genuinely want to see the best in people, assume things will work out for the best, and believe that there’s an intelligent force greater than myself that’s got everything covered.But I’m also human and that means when one thing is going wrong and nine things are going right, my entire focus will be on that ONE thing that’s not working out. The result, if left unchecked, is I get more of what I don’t want rather than ALL the good stuff I do want (and am actually receiving!).If this sounds familiar, worry not. Because what I’ve learned personally, and through coaching countless creatives, is that when we cultivate a growth mindset and hone our focus to what we want and what’s going well, we make huge leaps forward in our business and life.Here’s how to enhance your focus, boost your positive expectations, and get better results.AwarenessYou can’t solve a problem when you don’t know it exists, and the surest path I’ve found to self-awareness is a commitment to personal development. Taking personal responsibility for our part in any situation (good or bad) frees us up to look at how we handle things with curiosity rather than fear, see how it might be done better, and take a different course of action next time.What you can do: I’ve found that the practice of writing Morning Pages (from Julia Cameron’s book The Artist’s Way) is enormously helpful in processing events and allowing the wisdom within me to find a solution. If you’ve never heard of morning pages, why not give them a try for a month? I promise you won’t regret it.IntentionEach morning I set an intention for what I’d like to achieve that day. Now remember, intention is different from a to-do list. Your intention should feel meaningful to you and serve your greater goals, both personal and professional. For example, today I had a new client starting this morning, another after lunch, and this post to write, so my intention was to create the optimal conditions for me to deliver great value across the board. For me that meant making sure that my morning wasn’t rushed, finding time for a couple of quick brain-boosting walks, and avoiding distractions that didn’t align with my intention.What you can do: Before you sit down and start your day (and yes, that includes checking your email), set the intention for your day with a focus on why it’s important to you.FocusWith so many things we could be doing at any one moment, focus is the holy grail for a busy business owner. This is the action part of intention. When you inevitably find yourself being distracted by, oh Instagram, holiday planning, etc. etc. you can redirect yourself to the actions that align with your intention. Easy. As. That.What you can do: Try this simple hack: stick a post-it to your computer that says, “Is what I’m doing right now moving me measurably closer to my goals?” I swear, it works.ReviewYou’re not always going to set great intentions or have laser-like focus and that’s OK. Each day is different and sometimes stuff just happens, and you just have to roll with it. What can you let go? Where can you refocus and when? You’re not a machine and life should be flexible. Regroup and move on.What you can do: At the end of the day, write down what you did well (like not overacting to the snow storm hit and re-adjusting your expectations), what you could have done better, and if/how you might do something differently next time.What I love about each of these tips is they’re all easy to do and don’t take much time or effort. The secret is making them a habit, something you do every day. That’s when they become powerful drivers in your personal and professional development.How about you? What habits and rituals help you overcome business and life challenges? What helps you move the ball forward? Leave a comment and share a thought, challenge, or strategy. I’d love to hear from you!Justine Clay is a speaker and business coach for creative entrepreneurs and freelancers. Through a series of clear, actionable steps, Justine will teach you how to you identify what makes you stand out from the crowd, create a marketing message that resonates with your ideal clients, and build a successful and fulfilling creative business or career. Sign up for Justine’s free guide: How to Find High-Quality Clients and Get Paid What You’re Worth  and start making monumental changes in your creative business or career today.last_img

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