first_imgChicago Bears offensive tackle Bradley Sowell (79) celebrates a touchdown reception with teammates during the second half of an NFL football game against the Los Angeles Rams Sunday, Dec. 9, 2018, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh) 0 Comments   Share   The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Top Stories The Bears placed fifth in Doug Franz’s power rankings and fourth in Paul Calvisi’s. Related LinksCardinals draft Ohio State DE Nick Bosa in McShay’s 1st NFL mockThe Consensus Week 15: SB Nation rankings save Cardinals from cellarBehind Enemy Lines: Cardinals try to salvage road win against FalconsRon Wolfley did not follow suit. He simply had the Los Angeles Chargers and Kansas City Chiefs leap-frog the Patriots in his rankings compared to a week ago — this after New England fell on a wild two-lateral play in the final seconds against the Miami Dolphins.Calvisi dinged the Pats for that loss. They ranked second in his power poll last week but moved out of Calvisi’s top-five entirely, allowing for the Dallas Cowboys to enter. Dallas won its fifth in a row, beating the Eagles 29-23 this week.Maybe the other big takeaway from this week: a Rams loss wasn’t a cause for panic, as two of our pollsters kept them steady at No. 1 while Franz slid them down from second to third despite the loss to Chicago.A peek at each of the guys’ power polls are below:Doug Franz5. Bears4. Chargers3. Rams2. Chiefs1. SaintsRon Wolfley5. Patriots4. Chargers3. Chiefs2. Saints1. RamsPaul Calvisi5. Cowboys4. Bears3. Chiefs2. Saints1. Rams Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling The Chicago Bears have arrived. There’s hardly a better way to announce that than holding an 11-2 Los Angeles Rams juggernaut to six points on Sunday.Also, Bradley Sowell scored a touchdown. Yeah, that Bradley Sowell, the backup offensive tackle for the Arizona Cardinals from 2013-15.Anyway, all that made for a 15-6 victory that moved the Bears to 9-4 on the season. And also thanks to a loss by the Texans against the Indianapolis Colts that ended a nine-game winning streak for Houston, Chicago found itself in the Week 15 Doug & Wolf power poll. Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img

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first_imgRelated posts:4 things you need to know before investing in a local startup The different flavors of starting a business Why changing too fast can hurt new businesses Money for startups: The key to creating more companies? It doesn’t matter if you are managing your own business, supervising a small department, or simply running a tight ship at home – you are always trying to influence and persuade people. You want your employees to commit to the company, your team members to adhere to some procedures and ways of doing things, or your kids to pick up their mess.From an early age, we have experienced and most likely used the old “carrot and the stick” approach, which assumes rewards and punishments generate an unequivocal causality towards promoting desired behaviors and deterring unwanted ones. At its core, the rationale behind rewarding wanted behavior and punishing unwanted behavior is not completely flawed; after all, this is how we were raised, how our schools kept us in check, and how most companies try to guide the actions of their employees. They can’t all be wrong, right?But have you ever experienced the limitations of this approach? Have you ever seen kids (perhaps even yours) disobey in spite of being fully aware of the consequences, or employees not giving their best in spite of the attractive bonuses offered? There’s no easy way to influence behavior, even when common sense would tell us that everybody should want to obtain a reward and avoid a punishment. Surprising as it may sound, we don’t always act in our self-interest, and knowing what’s best for us is not always enough.Let me share some examples of how the old ways of stirring behavior often fall short, and what alternatives we have to be more successful at making others go our way.Example 1. I told them to do it, so why won’t they? Equally common among managers and parents, the assumption is that because we told someone what to do, or how to do it, this should automatically translate into them doing it. If you think about it, although coercion can sometimes do the trick, most of the time we do things when it makes sense to us, when it makes our lives easier, or when it helps us achieve something we want.Hack #1: Reframe by showing what’s in it for them. Authority alone doesn’t fly, especially with younger generations. Instead, try to frame the situation as a choice where there’s something they can get out of it. Instead of handing down the solution, work with them finding one and make it about simplifying things or achieving more. Change is uncomfortable, and we don’t want to do it unless we see a good reason to. Help people see that reason by reframing and you’ll be more successful at influencing their actions.Example 2. They know they shouldn’t do it, so why do they?  The administration at an apartment complex was struggling to make residents comply with the rule of picking up their dog’s poop and disposing of it properly. The idea of not accidentally stepping on poop should be incentive enough for people to comply, right? Wrong. People would let their pooch evacuate freely on the lawn in spite of all the signs warning and threatening offenders.Hack # 2: Make it easier for people to act. What’s true in game and app design is true in poop-disposing habits: want people to do something? Make it easy for them to do it. It turns out most people were breaking the rule because they kept forgetting the baggie upstairs, and no sign in the world was going to make them ride the elevator and come back to pick it up. The solution? Place bag dispensers all over with a positively worded sign encouraging residents to keep it clean for the sake of kids.Example 3. We all have to do it, so why won’t they? A friend from a network marketing company was having trouble with people attending the weekly meetings. Team members always had a good excuse not to be there in spite of having committed to show up the week before. The problem was that their commitment was towards an individual (my friend), so as long as they felt they had a good alibi, they were ok with breaking it.Hack # 3: Use social proof to your advantage. Nobody wants to be a castaway, and we will go to great lengths not to feel left out. I advised my friend to work on building a team identity and make the members commit to the team instead of to a person. Making everyone feel they were part of something bigger was the first step, because that is what connects one’s identity to the higher purpose of the team. Once members feel this, it is substantially harder to bail on each other. This works equally in the military, in church and on your soccer team. The second step was to have the members publicly commit to showing up to the meetings so that, if they failed to show, they were letting down not a person – whom they could later bluff – but rather the entire team.These are just a few of the many behavioral nudges that you can use to increase your ability to influence others and to help people, or yourself, make better decisions. The old carrot and the stick don’t always deliver, and our little irrationalities could always use an extra nudge. As always, feel free to comment below to share your own experiences or contact me if you have any questions.Read more “Doing Business columns” here. Randall Trejos works as a business developer, helping startups and medium-sized companies grow. He’s the co-director of the Founder Institute in Costa Rica and a strategy consultant at Grupo Impulso. You can follow his blog La Catapulta or contact him through LinkedIn. Stay tuned for the next edition of “Doing Business,” published twice-monthly. 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first_imgSource = e-Travel Blackboard: W.X <a href=”http://www.etbtravelnews.global/click/23419/” target=”_blank”><img src=”http://adsvr.travelads.biz/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=10&amp;cb=INSERT_RANDOM_NUMBER_HERE&amp;n=a5c63036″ border=”0″ alt=””></a> Samoa has seen a bumpy start to the year in terms of tourism arrivals, with January numbers increasing by 7% but February numbers dropping by 13%, says the tourism body.In January 9,016 international travellers visited Samoa, a 7.3% increase on 2009 figures, but in February a 6,902 visitors were recorded a 13.4% drop when compared to a year earlier, the Samoa Tourism Authority announced.“January  visitors’  arrival  increased  by  7.3% compared  to  January  2009.  The  increase  is  mainly due  to  the  significant  increase  in  the  number  of visitors from Asian countries at 89.8% plus visitors from three main markets,” said the tourism body.“February  visitors’  arrival  recorded  a  decline  of 13.4% compared to February 2009. The decline was  due  to  drop  in  the  number  of  visitors  to  Samoa from  all  markets.”Australia was the only country in Samoa’s top three inbound markets which recorded a significant drop in market share from January to February, dropping from 22% to 15%.  New Zealand stayed steady at 42%, while American Samoa dipped slightly from 19% to 18%.last_img

first_imgSource = TravelManagers Altius Group’s Co-Founder & CEO, Derick BoreanPersonal Travel Managers Excited by New Wellness InitiativeA celebration of success and a chance to plan for future success: these were the main themes at TravelManagers’ 2018 national conference, which has just concluded in Hawaii. Presentations from keynote speakers such as Turia Pitt, supplier workshops, pre- and post-conference famils and a gala awards dinner were all highlights of the conference itinerary, which ran over a three-day weekend and attracted more than 230 personal travel manager (PTMs) and NPO team members and 90 representatives from partner suppliers.The conference also served as an ideal environment in which to announce a new TravelManagers initiative aimed at supporting members’ health and wellbeing. The initiative, known as the Network Assistance Programme (NAP,) was announced by the company’s Executive General Manager, Michael Gazal, on day one of the conference, and he says the feedback has been overwhelmingly positive.“We have a very close-knit network of PTMs and National Partnership Office (NPO) personnel working together to support each other, both in business and at a personal level,” explains Gazal. “It’s an environment that’s not without its stresses and challenges, and until now, we’ve had no input in relation to professional, psychological support. That’s where PeopleSense comes in.”PeopleSense, as Gazal goes on to explain, is part of the Altius Group: a national company that provides specialist support, guidance and partnership to help organisations and their people realise their health potential.Altius Group’s Co-Founder & CEO, Derick Borean, says the programmes work by implementing and administering a range of individual and organisational psychology solutions and support, which work to improve wellbeing, productivity and engagement through proven proactive interventions. Borean explains. “Within the Altius Group we provide access to expertise across a wide range of professional services designed to improve the overall health of organisations and individuals. Our PeopleSense team are true experts in emotional health, dealing with issues from anxiety and anger management to relationship difficulties and trauma.”As part of the introduction of TravelManagers’ NAP programme, Borean ran a Wellness and Success Workshop at the national conference, in which attendees discussed the key pillars of wellness, their effect on performance, how to set simple goals and how to achieve them.“At the end of the workshop, we wanted people to walk away with their own personal plan to improve their wellness, and with knowledge on why, how and what to do to make positive changes to achieve lasting success,” Borean explains “They’ve buddied up with colleagues and have taken a big step forward in their wellness journey. That is great for them personally, and it’s great for their business”.Gazal says the introduction of the NAP programme reflects the value TravelManagers places on the PTM network, many of whom spend a large portion of their professional week working in geographical isolation.“Because our business model allows PTMs the flexibility and freedom to choose their work hours and location, we’ve always placed an emphasis on ensuring that they still have the support and camaraderie that they would have if they worked in a traditional office environment: NAP is about taking that support to the next level, and we’re very excited by it.”The link between a thriving business and its people is an obvious one, according to Borean, who says that healthy, engaged teams of people make a business more productive and successful.“Whether it’s maintaining people in health or rehabilitating them in the event of injury or illness, by combining our clinical expertise, the science of behaviour, our national resources and commercial acumen, we’ll be helping TravelManagers to achieve industry-leading outcomes that will enable them to focus on what they do best.”PTMs will receive six free support sessions per year, with round-the-clock access to a team of psychologists who have each completed four years’ tertiary degree and two years of professional supervision, as well as being registered with a regulatory body. This level of expertise offers PTMs proven, evidence-based strategies to help them out in their time of need.“Assistance will be made available to all PTMs and throughout the TravelManagers network, regardless of the remoteness their location,” Gazal adds. “It’s free, self-referred and completely confidential.”Borean notes that NAP is not just a programme for people in crisis: rather, he describes it as being equally designed to assist “normal everyday people, who feel they need some expert help with normal everyday issues.”For more information or to speak to someone confidentially about TravelManagers please contact Suzanne Laister on 1800 019 599.About TravelManagersTravel Managers operates in all Australian States and is a wholly owned subsidiary of House of Travel, Australasia’s largest independent travel company which has a forecast turnover of $2 billion for 2018. TravelManagers is a sister company to Hoot Holidays, also owned by House of Travel, and has more than 540 personal travel managers throughout Australia with a dedicated support team at the company’s national partnership office in Sydney. TravelManagers places all customer money in a dedicated and audited Client Trust Account which is separate from the general business accounts, ensuring client funds are secure and only used for client purchases.last_img

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