first_imgThe Undervalued East Meets the Overvalued West in Daily Dose, Data, Headlines, Market Studies, News If you could fold the United States in half, simply looking at the east or west would tell you where the most under- and overvalued residential markets are‒‒if, of course, you’re reading Forbes.The magazine Thursday published its list of the five most undervalued and overvalued markets in America, and the results show that the most undervalued markets are between the Atlantic Ocean and Detroit, while the most overvalued begin in Texas and head toward the Pacific.In overvalued markets, Texas lead the way with a tie for first place between Austin and San Antonio. Both markets suffered the recession only to bounce back with vengeance as the economy started to heal. According to Forbes, both markets are 19 percent overvalued, but that number belies an even greater disparity between gross economic growth and growth in each city’s real estate market.After busting in the recession, the economies of Austin and San Antonio recovered by 18 and 9 percent, respectively. But home price appreciation rose 41 percent in Austin through the end of 2015, and the current median home price in the capital city is $278,000. Meanwhile, San Antonio’s home prices grew 21 percent during the same time, and the median home price there is now $190,400.Phoenix, Las Vegas, and San Francisco rounded out the top five most overvalued markets on Forbes’ list. In each of those cities, overall economic growth in the single digits has met with home price appreciation percentages of 49, 52, and 58, respectively.On the other side of the equation and the other side of the country, New Haven came in as the most undervalued market in America through 2015. According to the magazine, the hometown of Yale University saw its economy and home prices each grow at a flat 2 percent, and the city is considered to be 23 percent undervalued. Also 23 percent below where it should be is Detroit, which still has a glut of inventory and slow economic recovery.Rounding out the top five undervalued markets are Hartford, where homes are 21 percent below fair market value, Providence (17 percent), and Cleveland, where a 9 percent economic improvement has outpaced the city’s 2 percent growth in housing prices. Cleveland is considered to be undervalued by 16 percent.According to Forbes, these markets are no surprise when you look at jobs. Where job growth is booming, like in San Antonio’s tech and health sectors, markets inflate; where jobs are down and inventory is plenty, like in Cleveland, prices remain below where they ought to be. Affordability Forbes Housing Markets 2016-06-10 Scott_Morgancenter_img June 10, 2016 470 Views Sharelast_img

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first_img Facebook Comments 5 questions for Costa Rica’s indigenous Jirondai Project Related posts:5 questions for Costa Rican artist Alejandro Villalobos PHOTOS: International Museum Day in Costa Rica Costa Rican artist Elizabeth Argüello designed a Google doodle for Sunday 5 questions for a Costa Rican musician, dancer and modelcenter_img Costa Rican rapper Nativa has released her second album, “Semilla Nativa” (“Native Seed”), which combines rap with Latin American rhythms and activist lyrics.The album is released by the record label Resistencia Subversiva (Subversive Resistance). and includes songs inspired by Nativa’s personal growth. Her lyrics provide social analysis of our times and focus on Latin American identity, politics, the environment and gender, according to a news release from the label. Costa Rican rapper Nativa released her new album Semilla Nativa. Artwork by Colombian muralist Gleo. Courtesy of NativaAccording to a press release, the album’s name is a tribute to the indigenous, afrodescendant and campesino (farmer) communities who are working to preserve their native seeds.“The seeds are nodes of relationships, pathway crossings, synthesis of history, starting points, knowledge that gives life. That’s what this album is about: the gathering of many Latin American artists who believe in the appropriation of our roots,” Nativa said in the statement.Listen to the album here:Nativa is not only a musician, but also a cultural manager and activist. Her album includes 12 tracks that feature six renowned creators of rap instrumentals from Costa Rica, Venezuela and Mexico. She also collaborated with Costa Rican musicians including Funka, Fabián “Choc” Vargas, and Tania Casarrubias, and Proyecto Jirondaí‘s indigenous Cabécar singer Luis Salazar.This musical homage to Costa Rica’s native seeds is now available on different digital platforms such as Spotify, SoundCloud and Resistencia Subversiva’s website. For more information follow Nativa on Facebook.last_img

first_img Meghan McCain to release audiobook on conservatism, family Top Stories More Valley freeways to be closed this weekend for improvements HAVANA, Cuba (AP) – A British fleet-support ship has docked in Havana’s harbor as Cuba and the U.K. prepare to mark the 250th anniversary of the Battle of Havana.The gray RFA Fort Rosalie arrived Wednesday morning with more than 100 crewmembers aboard. It tied up at the cruise ship terminal and was greeted by a band playing both countries’ national anthems.British forces laid siege to Havana in June 1762 during the Seven Years’ War. At the time, the city was an important base for Spanish military power in the Western Hemisphere. 5 ways to recognize low testosterone New high school in Mesa lets students pick career paths Think Tank analyzes the second round of Democratic debatescenter_img 5 treatments for adult scoliosis Sponsored Stories Comments   Share   Havana remained under British control until the following year, when Spain ceded Florida under a treaty. The Fort Rosalie usually aids British Navy operations. Its visit coincides with British cultural week, which includes cinematic, theatrical and musical events.(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) 4 ways to protect your company from cyber breacheslast_img

first_img Sponsored Stories Here’s how to repair and patch damaged drywall Mesa family survives lightning strike to home SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Violinist Won Hyung Joon wants to bring North and South Korean musicians together next month to perform on each side of the world’s most heavily armed border. Standing in the way is the rivals’ long, frustrating inability to move past their painful shared history.Won says North Korean diplomats in Berlin have tentatively signed off on a plan for a renowned German conductor to lead a 70-member South Korean orchestra through Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony and the Korean folk tune “Arirang” while accompanied by a choir of 70 North Koreans just across the border on Aug. 15, the 70th anniversary of the 1945 liberation of a single Korea from Japan’s 35-year colonial rule. Top Stories Ex-FBI agent details raid on Phoenix body donation facility In this June 24, 2015 photo, South Korean violinist Won Hyung Joon performs during an interview at his office in Seoul, South Korea. Violinist Won wants to help the bitterly divided Korean Peninsula by bringing North and South Korean musicians together next month to perform on each side of the world’s most heavily armed border. Standing in the way is the rivals’ long, frustrating inability to forget their painful shared history. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon) New Valley school lets students pick career-path academies How Arizona is preparing the leader of the next generationcenter_img Won and some outside analysts believe the concert will likely happen. Pyongyang may see it as a way to improve ties with Seoul, which could then stimulate a flow of aid and investment that the impoverished country needs to help revive its decrepit economy. Better relations with Seoul could also help offset North Korea’s fraying ties with China, its only major ally.German maestro Christoph Poppen, who has agreed to do the conducting on Aug. 15, called music the only “language which you can understand all across barriers.”“It’s simply much stronger than language, and it can overcome also emotional conflicts and problems,” he said.Still, Won, 39, knows that bitterness over the Koreas’ tangled past can easily get in the way. In May, for instance, Pyongyang, on the eve of a planned trip by U.N. chief Ban Ki-moon to a jointly run factory park across the border in North Korea, canceled the invitation.If the North-South concert on the border doesn’t happen, Won plans to gather the South Korean musicians and play someplace else, possibly near a South Korean border check-point or a former frontline U.S. army base.Won, executive director of Seoul-based Lindenbaum Music, said the concert idea was inspired by the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, a troupe of Israeli and Arab musicians founded in 1999 by Israeli conductor Daniel Barenboim and late Palestinian academic Edward Said as a gesture of peaceful coexistence in the Middle East. Won is working this time with Uwe Schmelter, a Korea expert and retired regional director of the Goethe-Institute in East Asia, who has persuaded the North Korean Embassy in Berlin to sign off on the concert. Now it is a matter of winning an endorsement from a higher-level organization in Pyongyang. Schmelter said last week he’s acting as a mediator but declined to provide details about the delicate negotiations.“With a project of this magnitude, there really is no easy or ideal time,” said violinist David Kim, concertmaster at the Philadelphia Orchestra and a member of Won’s team. “Relations between the two Koreas are always complicated and everyone knows that. But music itself is not complicated at all — it touches and softens people’s hearts.”“In order to pull this off, there has to be a visionary, a dreamer … who believes in the cause with all their heart and is unwilling to accept no for an answer. That person is Won.”Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Wary South Korean officials, however, want a more formal endorsement from Pyongyang before they give their agreement to a concert at the border village of Panmunjom, where an armistice ended the three-year Korean War in 1953. Won and his German partners are pushing for that formal go-ahead from Pyongyang.Dozens of Korean musicians joining their instruments and voices in harmony across the border, Won says, could dramatically illustrate the continuing tragedy of the Korean Peninsula, which, after liberation from Japan, was divided into a pro-U.S South and Soviet-backed North and remains in a technical state of war because a peace treaty formally ending the eventual Korean War has never been settled.“We won’t be able to talk to each other or hug each other. We’ll just stand face to face and commune through music,” Won said. “We want to do something meaningful at a meaningful place on a meaningful day.”First, though, he has to win support from two governments whose reluctance to cooperate, even on the most seemingly mild proposals, is often ingrained.The countries, which enjoyed a period of rapprochement in the 2000s, bar their citizens from exchanging visits, phone calls, letters and email without government permission. Naval skirmishes occasionally happen. And Pyongyang, which faces global condemnation for its nuclear bomb program, has recently responded with fury to the opening of a U.N. office in Seoul meant to monitor what defectors, activists and many countries call an abysmal human rights record. Natural spring cleaning tips and tricks for your home Arts, sports and other non-political events have sometimes helped smooth relations between rival countries.In 1989, for instance, Soviet exile and renowned cellist Mstislav Rostropovich played Bach suites below the crumbling Berlin Wall before making a return to Russia to perform with Washington’s National Symphony Orchestra the next year.A previous flurry of cultural and sports exchanges between the Koreas largely ended when conservatives took over from previous liberal governments in Seoul in 2008, though there have been sporadic exchanges between Pyongyang and the West. The New York Philharmonic held a concert in Pyongyang in 2008, while a North Korean and a French orchestra performed together in Paris in 2012 under the baton of noted South Korean-born conductor Chung Myung-Whun.In 2011, Won partnered with then Philadelphia Orchestra chief conductor Charles Dutoit to push for a joint youth orchestra performance, also on Aug. 15, but in Pyongyang.Dutoit visited North Korea, conducted the country’s symphony orchestra and earned support from culture officials for the project. But the plan fell apart after Pyongyang wanted to reschedule the concert for October 2011 because of annual summertime military drills between Washington and Seoul that it sees as invasion rehearsals. Clean energy: Why it matters for Arizona 0 Comments   Share   last_img

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