first_img“One, two, three… ‘Ka’ is the answer for all three of them! What is next?…What next? Hurry up… Time is running out.”Students and guardians in groups were humming while sharing leaked answers and questions ahead of a Junior School Certificate (JSC) examination in front of an exam centre in the capital on 14 November.A video recorded on the day also shows a group of students surrounded by their female guardians were seen busy sharing answers to the leaked questions among them in front of Mazedul Islam Model High School.The video also shows they got the questions through their smart phones.Some guardians alleged that the authorities concerned have failed to stop question paper leaks as the leakers are using digital devices to reach the students.The guardians also said the leakers are mainly sharing the question papers through Facebook Messenger, Whatsapp and Viber.“We have received a few allegations in this regard. The intelligence and BTRC have been asked to investigate into the matter,” said Tapan Kumar Sarkar, an examination controller of the Dhaka Intermediate and Secondary Education Board.The authorities have also asked the BTRC authorities to inspect the Facebook links that were involved with the question leaks, he added.Earlier, the authorities banned carrying cameras and smart phones at the exam centres after a group of teachers were found to have been leaking questions from the exam centres.last_img

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first_imgOne hundred promising young athletes in eastern Jamaica were among the first to get first-class training in several competitive events at the start of the Digicel/MVP Grassroots Clinic.Now in its fourth year, Digicel has again teamed up with the MVP Track and Field Club to host the series of track and field clinics across Jamaica.The first of the five clinics was held at the Morant Bay High School on Saturday, September 24, where the youngsters from schools in the Surrey county underwent a day of intense training with professionals from the internationally acclaimed athletics club.”Our outstanding success at the Olympics just last month is the reason we see it necessary to continue this programme. Unfortunately, a day will come when these amazing athletes will hang up their spikes. Therefore, development programmes such as the MVP Clinic will help to ensure that Jamaica always has a fresh crop of athletes ready to continue our successes on the world stage,” said Danielia Mclean, sponsorship manager at Digicel.During the day of training, students were taken through six disciplines in track and field, sprinting, hurdling, relays, throws, long distance, and jumps. These sessions were led by stalwart coaches such as Paul Francis, Linval Swaby, and Shanikie Osbourne.”The idea is that through this programme, students and their coaches are introduced to world-class training methods. Additionally, they are introduced to athletic disciplines that they may not have had much exposure to before. Take, for instance, Junelle Bromfield, who competed in hurdles, relays, sprints, and middle distances while at STETHS, she is now focused on the 400m sprint, where she won the IAAF World Under-20 bronze medal this July,” said Bruce James, president of the MVP.The clinic will – in the next two weeks – head to Vere and St Elizabeth Technical High schools after which a number of the top-performing students will be selected to participate in advanced training camps in St James and St Catherine. At the end of the advanced camps, one outstanding athlete will receive a scholarship valued at $1 million to attend the University of Technology and train with the MVP Track & Field Club.Sponsors of the Digicel MVP Grassroots Athletics Programme are Nike, Reggae Jammin, National Commercial Bank, and Gatorade.last_img

first_imgDear Editor,Whether or not we are inclined to admit it, we cannot deny the fact that British Guiana, now Guyana, is the progenitor of the sugar industry. In this context alone, we need to acknowledge that much respect is due to our forbearers who toiled with sweat and tears to sustain and develop the industry despite the many obstacles that arose from time to time.Even at this stage, centuries later, it is difficult to envision a Guyana without this nodal industry and, therefore, every encouragement and support should be offered to those who are charged with the responsibility of managing the industry. Talk about divestment should not be entertained unless the ‘alternative’ is patently and obviously superior. We should not risk ‘throwing away the baby with the bath-water!’We need to re-commit ourselves to the potential of our sugar industry and to do what it takes to ensure its survival and sustainability.Sincerely,Nowrang Persaudlast_img

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Each year, the Diamond Bar school welcomes an author to visit the school and help promote literacy. Fraser has written and illustrated over 58 books. Among her books are “Where Are the Night Animals?”, “How Animal Babies Stay Safe” and the “IQ” book series. – From staff reports • Photo Gallery: Stories are made Students at Quail Summit Elementary in Diamond Bar on Thursday received some tips on writing from children’s author and illustrator Mary Ann Fraser. Kids in grades kindergarten through fifth helped Fraser create a story, as they selected the character, setting and problem. “Your imagination is the best tool to use to get ideas,” the children’s book author told the students. last_img

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