first_imgNew Delhi: A former apex court employee, who levelled allegations of sexual harassment against Chief Justice of India Ranjan Gogoi, decided Tuesday not to participate any more before the in-house inquiry panel. The employee said in a statement that Tuesday was the third day she had gone to participate before the three-member panel headed by Justice S A Bobde. “But due to serious concerns and reservations, I am no longer participating in these in-house committee proceedings,” she said in a statement.last_img

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first_imgEAST HANTS COUNTY: Trunk 1 Trunk 1 from Uniacke Mines Road west to Lakelands South Rawdon Road will have one-lane closures for patching and sealing from Thursday, July 26 to Friday, Aug. 31. Work takes place from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Local Area Office: 902-798-6885 Fax: 902-798-2927 Local Area Office: 902-798-6885 Fax: 902-798-2927 -30- EAST HANTS COUNTY: Trunk 14 Trunk 14 from Cheese Factory Corner (Route 202) to Beaverbank Road (Route 354) will have one-lane closures for patching and sealing from Thursday, July 26, to Friday, Aug. 31. Work takes place from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. WEST HANTS COUNTY: Trunk 14 Trunk 14 to the Lunenburg County line will have one-lane closures for patching and sealing from Thursday, July 26, to Friday, Aug. 31. Work takes place from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Local Area Office: 902-798-6885 Fax: 902-798-2927last_img

first_imgEnsuring a robust last-minute impression on voters prior to the start of the first polling phase of Lok Sabha elections this week, BJP unveiled its manifesto. Building on its ‘New India’ narrative, the manifesto depicts India’s progress in the last five years followed by a cluster of promises that envisage ambitious strides towards development. The manifesto runs along the similar lines of its 2014 version, carrying forward the work (schemes and policies) initiated in the previous term. With renewed deadlines, strong take on national security and categorical promises to maximise outreach ensuring inclusiveness, the release of BJP’s 2019 manifesto will facilitate robust voter discussions across the nation during election silence. The decisive leadership of Modi is the key theme of BJP’s manifesto apart from their ’75 milestones for India @75′ where the party claims to fulfil 75 goals by the 75th anniversary of India’s Independence in 2022. The manifesto comprises a trove of government schemes sprawling across sectors alongside crucial promises in key areas such as agriculture, national & internal security, women empowerment, infrastructure, youth and education. Previously unkept promises – double income for farmers and clean Ganga – get a new lease of life with the deadline of 2022 while huge infrastructural promises appear to be banking on achievements of the last five years. Also Read – A compounding difficulty Few novel promises provide the special touch to the manifesto which is aimed at the dreams of 130 crore Indians. In spirit, BJP’s manifesto, like its previous one, aims to garner hope, stressing a lot on the achievements of Modi’s first innings. Ram Mandir and Sabarimala, the two cultural disputes which prevailed during the Modi years have been included with the party promising expeditious construction of Ram Mandir in Ayodhya. This may draw criticism since the matter was referred to mediation by SC. Nevertheless, BJP reiterated its strong stance on the issue. It promises pension schemes for small & marginal farmers as well as all small shopkeepers, a massive Rs 25 lakh crore on rural productivity, and several PM-yojnas to ensure demands of rural India are met. After all, three major Kisan March under Modi demanded urgent revisioning in the agriculture sector. Much needed Rs 1 lakh crore investment in higher education, a conventional promise of increasing seats in premier institutions of the country, and a special entrepreneurial Northeast scheme. A little more clarity in Ayushman Bharat with the promise of establishing 1.5 lakh health & wellness centres apart from ensuring a robust doctor-population ratio of 1:1400. First of its kind university of foreign policy to be set up and a uniform civil code to be drafted. Empowering transgenders, enacting triple talaq and Citizenship Amendment Bill, abrogation of Article 370 as well as annulling Article 35A, NRC for other states, drafting a model police act and modernisation of police forces, setting up national institutes of teachers’ training, a national policy for reskilling & upskilling outline BJP’s novel promises. Reducing the poverty rate in India below 10 per cent by 2024, making India a $5 trillion economy by 2025, providing piped water connection to every household by 2024, ensure banking services within 5 kms of everyone, ODF status for all villages and cities, mark the party’s zeal towards progress and good governance. BJP aims to curb air pollution by eliminating crop residue burning and converting NCAP into a mission like Swachh Bharat to ensure widespread compliance and workforce in meeting the envisioned target. BJP envisages 100 lakh crore investment in infrastructure which comprises doubling the length of national highways, increasing port capacity to 2,500 MTPA, ensuring 150 operational airports, et al, citing a strong developmental trajectory as evident in the culminated term. Also Read – An askew democracyBJP’s manifesto bridges Modi’s first innings with his bid for a consecutive second, strongly advocating Modi’s achievements as a decisive leader. While that sounds like a masterstroke, it may also backfire since the party’s footprint is now reduced to chants of Modi and new India. It is worth noting that back in 2014, Modi-led BJP garnered massive majority owing to huge disappointment from UPA-II. Corruption made up a huge chunk of BJP’s campaigning and a wide fiscal deficit bolstered BJP’s rise to power. In Modi, India saw the possibility of a much-needed change and hence, voted accordingly. Now while Modi ensured a cleaner term with respect to corruption, a number of issues in unemployment, agrarian distress, institutional subterfuge, failed promises and anti-incumbency plagued it. National interest was piqued with a forward and solid stance during instances of national security and gross progress highlighted to balance the failures. Manifestos will seldom be less ambitious and that is why judging the scale of ambition should not really be a critique’s take. Rather, the intent serves as a more practical indicator for forming an opinion which shall influence the vote. Both Congress and BJP have put up their promises and the nation has to now decide how relevant their promises are with our thoughts and expectations.last_img

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. A quarter of British parents do not help their children with homework, a survey has found, as experts say they are put off for fear of embarrassment.A poll of over 27,000 parents in 29 different countries found that just over one in 10 UK mothers and fathers spend the equivalent of at least an hour a day assisting their children with their school work.Meanwhile, parents from India, Vietnam, Colombia and Malaysia were the most likely to spend seven hours a week helping their children with homework, according to a survey published by the Varkey Foundation, a global education charity.On average, British parents spend 3.6 hours a week helping their youngsters, the poll calculates.Chris McGovern, chairman of Campaign for Real Education, said that while middle class parents might hire private tutors to guide their children through the homework, deprived families may lack the wherewithal to do the same. “It is a tragic situation where children are not getting the right support,” he said. “Children who suffer the most are ones whose parents can’t help them. We need an adult literacy and numeracy programme.“Some parents are not able to help their children even if they want to, they are ashamed and embarrassed that they can’t read.” A quarter of British parents do not help their children with homework, a survey has foundcenter_img A quarter of British parents do not help their children with homework, a survey has found A 2013 study by the publisher Pearson found that more than half lacked the confidence to help children with simple sums in the home.Just one in 20 respondents could correctly answer a full list of questions suitable for pupils aged 11 and under. The study found that 30 per cent of parents “don’t feel confident enough in their own maths skills to help their children with their primary school maths homework”.Meanwhile, some 53 per cent insisted they struggled to understand the new maths teaching methods used in modern classrooms.last_img

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