first_imgEnsuring a robust last-minute impression on voters prior to the start of the first polling phase of Lok Sabha elections this week, BJP unveiled its manifesto. Building on its ‘New India’ narrative, the manifesto depicts India’s progress in the last five years followed by a cluster of promises that envisage ambitious strides towards development. The manifesto runs along the similar lines of its 2014 version, carrying forward the work (schemes and policies) initiated in the previous term. With renewed deadlines, strong take on national security and categorical promises to maximise outreach ensuring inclusiveness, the release of BJP’s 2019 manifesto will facilitate robust voter discussions across the nation during election silence. The decisive leadership of Modi is the key theme of BJP’s manifesto apart from their ’75 milestones for India @75′ where the party claims to fulfil 75 goals by the 75th anniversary of India’s Independence in 2022. The manifesto comprises a trove of government schemes sprawling across sectors alongside crucial promises in key areas such as agriculture, national & internal security, women empowerment, infrastructure, youth and education. Previously unkept promises – double income for farmers and clean Ganga – get a new lease of life with the deadline of 2022 while huge infrastructural promises appear to be banking on achievements of the last five years. Also Read – A compounding difficulty Few novel promises provide the special touch to the manifesto which is aimed at the dreams of 130 crore Indians. In spirit, BJP’s manifesto, like its previous one, aims to garner hope, stressing a lot on the achievements of Modi’s first innings. Ram Mandir and Sabarimala, the two cultural disputes which prevailed during the Modi years have been included with the party promising expeditious construction of Ram Mandir in Ayodhya. This may draw criticism since the matter was referred to mediation by SC. Nevertheless, BJP reiterated its strong stance on the issue. It promises pension schemes for small & marginal farmers as well as all small shopkeepers, a massive Rs 25 lakh crore on rural productivity, and several PM-yojnas to ensure demands of rural India are met. After all, three major Kisan March under Modi demanded urgent revisioning in the agriculture sector. Much needed Rs 1 lakh crore investment in higher education, a conventional promise of increasing seats in premier institutions of the country, and a special entrepreneurial Northeast scheme. A little more clarity in Ayushman Bharat with the promise of establishing 1.5 lakh health & wellness centres apart from ensuring a robust doctor-population ratio of 1:1400. First of its kind university of foreign policy to be set up and a uniform civil code to be drafted. Empowering transgenders, enacting triple talaq and Citizenship Amendment Bill, abrogation of Article 370 as well as annulling Article 35A, NRC for other states, drafting a model police act and modernisation of police forces, setting up national institutes of teachers’ training, a national policy for reskilling & upskilling outline BJP’s novel promises. Reducing the poverty rate in India below 10 per cent by 2024, making India a $5 trillion economy by 2025, providing piped water connection to every household by 2024, ensure banking services within 5 kms of everyone, ODF status for all villages and cities, mark the party’s zeal towards progress and good governance. BJP aims to curb air pollution by eliminating crop residue burning and converting NCAP into a mission like Swachh Bharat to ensure widespread compliance and workforce in meeting the envisioned target. BJP envisages 100 lakh crore investment in infrastructure which comprises doubling the length of national highways, increasing port capacity to 2,500 MTPA, ensuring 150 operational airports, et al, citing a strong developmental trajectory as evident in the culminated term. Also Read – An askew democracyBJP’s manifesto bridges Modi’s first innings with his bid for a consecutive second, strongly advocating Modi’s achievements as a decisive leader. While that sounds like a masterstroke, it may also backfire since the party’s footprint is now reduced to chants of Modi and new India. It is worth noting that back in 2014, Modi-led BJP garnered massive majority owing to huge disappointment from UPA-II. Corruption made up a huge chunk of BJP’s campaigning and a wide fiscal deficit bolstered BJP’s rise to power. In Modi, India saw the possibility of a much-needed change and hence, voted accordingly. Now while Modi ensured a cleaner term with respect to corruption, a number of issues in unemployment, agrarian distress, institutional subterfuge, failed promises and anti-incumbency plagued it. National interest was piqued with a forward and solid stance during instances of national security and gross progress highlighted to balance the failures. Manifestos will seldom be less ambitious and that is why judging the scale of ambition should not really be a critique’s take. Rather, the intent serves as a more practical indicator for forming an opinion which shall influence the vote. Both Congress and BJP have put up their promises and the nation has to now decide how relevant their promises are with our thoughts and expectations.last_img

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first_imgFormer Reggae Boyz striker and captain Luton Shelton is trying to get his career back on track, but is being stalled by a series of injuries.After spending a decade as a professional player overseas, Shelton returned to Harbour View FC in an effort to recover from injuries after his contract with Volga Nizhny Nougorod in Russia ended last year.Shelton is registered with local club Harbour View, where he started as a youth player, and made the transition to the senior team. He left Harbour View in 2006 and joined Helsingborg in Sweden on contract.Harbour View’s general manager Clyde Jureidini confirmed the move in a recent chat with The Gleaner.”He (Shelton) is registered to play for Harbour View, but is not playing due to injuries,” Jureidini said. “He is out of contract. That is why he is here to play in the Red Stripe Premier League.””Luton has been trying to recover from injuries. We are trying to get his career back on track,” Jureidini further stated.Shelton is Jamaica’s all-time record goalscorer, with 35 strikes in 75 games. He also played at international clubs such as Sheffield United, Valerenga and Karabukspor.last_img

first_imgCORONA – The chorus of voices grew, the sound bouncing from wall to wall in Corona Santiago’s gym like a pingpong game. Photo Gallery: Norco defeats Diamond Ranch One side had the momentum. Then the other side grabbed it. Finally, the voices on one side of the gym exploded in one massive cheer; the other side fell silent. The Norco girls basketball team won a heartstopping 69-68 overtime thriller against Diamond Ranch on Tuesday night, advancing to the CIF-SS Division II-AA championship game at the Pyramid in Long Beach. “In order to be a coach, you have to have CPR (training),” Norco coach Rick Thompson said. “I just never thought I’d have to use it on myself.” With 6.6 seconds remaining in overtime, Diamond Ranch inbounded the ball at the far end of the court, down one point. The No. 2 seed Panthers (27-2) put the ball in the hands of their most reliable ballhandler, senior Eliza Dy, who streaked down the court and tried to toss up an off-balance layup. But the shot wasn’t close, and the buzzer sounded to end Diamond Ranch’s CIF title defense as No. 3 seed Norco (27-2) celebrated. center_img The game was highlighted by two exceptional performances. Norco won in large part because spunky sharpshooter Tyler Howard hit nine 3-pointers and scored a total of 30 points. That helped the Cougars survive a phenomenal performance from UCLA-bound star Nina Earl, who poured in 39 points on 16-of-24 shooting to go along with 12 rebounds, three blocks and three steals. She hit all eight of her shots in the second half. Dy tied the game at 65 on a pair of free throws with 50.5 seconds remaining in regulation. Neither team scored the rest of the way, and the Panthers tried an inbounds play with one second left, but Dy missed a tough layup. In overtime, Norco’s Cierra Windham (26 points) scored the first four points, but Earl cut the lead to 69-67 with a pair of free throws. The Cougars committed an offensive foul on their next possession to give Earl a one-and-one with 39 seconds left, but she missed the second shot. Dy got her last-chance run following a Norco turnover, but the Cougars survived. “One point doesn’t make us the better team,” Thompson said. “It just lets us play next week.” Diamond Ranch could still make the CIF-State tournament, but coach Vince Spirlin wasn’t sure. “It just didn’t fall our way,” he said. “In a game that close, funny things are gonna happen. We put ourselves in that predicament.” Said Howard: “We came here with one goal and that was to get to the Pyramid. We were determined to win and we wanted it more.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre “This is not the Navy. He doesn’t get people to automatically salute.” While Brewer said he’ll continue to work with the union, he called it time to step away from business as usual if the district wants real reform. “We have a legal and moral imperative here. … Previous initiatives have failed because of a lack of commitment to sustain it and a lack of political will. Right now, if you want change, you have to be bold. You can’t half-step it.” But Brewer has been under attack by members of a key task force on the plan over concepts such as carving out a separate district of 44 low-performing schools. Under pressure, Brewer reduced the number of schools by 10 and scrapped the idea of putting the schools under separate governance. One San Fernando Valley school, Sylmar High, remains on the list. Brewer also emphasized that the plan is “evolving and fluid,” and he expects changes before its 2008-09 implementation. The plan includes a curriculum aligned with state standards, focused professional development, safe schools and performance accountability and incentives. Reassignment fight From December to January, the local district superintendent will examine each school’s staff and determine whether there needs to be a change in principals or teachers. But Duffy decried that plan. “Somebody needs to whisper into the superintendent’s ear that he can’t just reassign teachers. There’s a contract, and he better follow the rules,” he said. Still, Brewer said the state gives more latitude in reassigning teachers because the schools need corrective actions to improve student achievement. “Some of these schools are failing for a reason, based on the leadership going on,” Brewer said. “The bottom line is we reserve the right to go in and make the changes necessary.” Duffy said bringing scripted-program teaching to secondary schools will have a “devastating effect on comprehension and problem-solving for elementary schools kids who then go to middle school … and can read but don’t know what they’re reading.” And he said studies show merit pay does little to boost student achievement and creates unhealthy competition among teachers. Board member Julie Korenstein agreed, saying a better plan would give a bonus reward to an entire school if it improves. Brewer argues that performance pay will provide incentives to retain highly qualified teachers in areas of need. Korenstein said she’s also frustrated that Brewer has not created the plan with board input. “He tends to come up with a grandiose plan, then backs down because it doesn’t make sense,” Korenstein said, referring to Brewer’s original proposal to create a separate mini-district of low-performing schools. “You usually have seven board members and a superintendent who work together to develop policy. You don’t have a superintendent developing policy and shoving it down people’s throats. That’s how you get into trouble.” Board member Richard Vladovic said he hopes both sides come to an agreement. “There should be a dialogue and if he hasn’t reached out to the union, I’m concerned. If I feel there hasn’t been sufficient dialogue, I’m going to make sure that at least all sides are heard,” he said. Raphael Sonenshein, a political science professor at California State University, Fullerton, said Brewer faces a key political test. “The union isn’t unbeatable, but I don’t know if you can do it on your own. It takes political strategy, some coalition building, consulting as much as you can and knowing where to draw the line,” he said. “This re-emphasizes the need of the superintendent to have a true political strategy that can give him the leverage he needs to get the reforms he wants.” Transforming schools Janelle Erickson, a spokeswoman for Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, who has tried to take a more active role in running the district, said the mayor will continue to work with everyone. “Only through partnership and collaboration will we truly transform our public schools,” Erickson said. And after a challenging year of dealing with the powerful teachers union, Sonenshein said the superintendent may be overreaching. “He has a lot of ground to make up, and the problem is you can’t make it up all at once, and it may be that what he’ll like to do is make a big, bold step that makes up a lot of ground,” he said. “But in reality, it’s a series of small steps he’s going to need to reground his superintendentship that is sustainable over a long period of time. “This may be a little bit of a long pass to recoup a lot of ground. If it can’t be backed up with political strength, it actually ends up being costly than helpful.” For the latest school news, go to www.insidesocal.com/education. naush.boghossian@dailynews.com 818-713-3722160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Defying opposition from the teachers union, Los Angeles Unified Superintendent David Brewer III on Wednesday released a final plan to reform nearly three dozen schools that includes key elements vehemently decried by the union. Despite union-leadership opposition to proposals including reassignment of teachers, merit pay and scripted teaching at middle and high schools, Brewer kept all of the concepts in his final plan. The move sets up a critical showdown with the union, which now will target Los Angeles Unified School District board members, expected to vote on Brewer’s plan later this month. “He’s … declaring war. He’s got to get this by the board of education and we’re going to weigh into it very heavily,” A.J. Duffy, president of United Teachers Los Angeles, said. last_img

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