first_imgGlassdoor has a new look, and a new brand compass guiding it forward to help everyone find a job that fits their life. With a renewed focus on users, Glassdoor is notably more modern, clean and purposeful.At the front of the redesign is a new logo, featuring a jewel-toned green door-shape. A new color palette, font, brand attributes, voice & tone definition and impactful product refresh round out the biggest redesign in Glassdoor’s nearly 9-year history. A rewiring of this magnitude required teams at all levels working in close collaboration, as the new look and feel touched every aspect of the business.Enter Marisa Lehnert, Glassdoor’s Creative Director, and Neil Campbell, Director of User Experience for Glassdoor Product, working side-by-side, charged with the brand and product refresh. The two led a cross-functional team creating a new brand identity while reimagining Glassdoor’s global digital products — shaping the way the world views jobs and recruiting.The three of us caught up during the final days before the refresh went live to talk about the design process and what they hope job seekers and employers will love about the new Glassdoor.Amy Elisa Jackson: You’ve spent the last 7 or 8 months reimagining one of the world’s largest and fast-growing jobs’ sites. And you did it. How does it feel?Marisa Lehnert: Exciting! This is why I came to Glassdoor. I wanted to come here to help tell a more beautiful brand story and we did. That was actually in my pitch during my interview with CMO Moody [Glasgow]. Amy Elisa: That was about a year and a half ago?Marisa: Yep. Moody wanted to show more of a human component to the job search and show more personality to the brand.Amy Elisa: Some people might say this looks like a whole new site. A rebrand, if you will. But you insist it’s a refresh. Why?Neil Campbell: It’s a fresh coat of paint on the house instead of full tear-down/rebuild. We have a pretty solid foundation and this is the first step in a renovation. New windows, and dare I say doors, are on order and the architectural plans are already being drafted for future improvements.Marisa: Refresh, yes. There are some sacred cows we just wouldn’t touch, like our connection to the color green…Amy Elisa: Sacred cow? What’s that?Marisa: It’s a Marisa-ism.Neil: After working with her all these months, I understand what it means.Amy Elisa: Ah okay.Neil: From the product side, and perhaps in CEO Robert Hohman’s mind, the pivotal moment was getting to see the brand attributes come to life in a way that we could start to visualize the impact a refresh could have on the product itself. It gave us a focal point to build a meaningful experience that really inspires people. Marisa: At the same time, Robert wanted to “take our homepage back,” which was his way of saying that when people come to Glassdoor they should know it’s Glassdoor and we should have a dynamic presence.Amy Elisa: Talk to me about the timeline of this process. When did you get the green light?Marisa: Exploring what a refresh could look like started in August. I stood in front of the executive team presenting three different looks and feels for what the brand could be in October. When they saw the very abstract concept of our app icon and what that can look like companywide, Robert and co-founder Tim Besse got really excited and saw the potential. That’s when I got the okay to just go for it. Product design got the go ahead then to start iterating on the homepage, and we were looking at fleshed out designs in December.Amy Elisa: Marisa, your creative design team is 4 people total. How did you all pull this off?Marisa: We had to be scrappy and fully transparent internally. It was great to build an in-house design team to help educate people and train people on how to work with designers. Plus, we have a fully equipped facilities team, finance team and HR that all understand design and collaborated to make this happen. We also brought in an amazing agency, Nelson Cash. They really approached the brand from a scientific perspective which was very fascinating creatively. Hundreds and hundreds of sketches of doors on Post-It notes — letter shapes and the round edges make it feel more human, plus we really looked at organic shapes and reflections through glass.Neil: In terms of the scale of this endeavor, the magnitude surprised and overwhelmed us at times. I think any large project like this does because of the vast number of stakeholders, inputs and the diversity of our customers. As designers we work hard to achieve excellence in the face of adversity. Our craft demands this and I’m proud of how well the team adapted to change and shifting requirements.Marisa: We had to hone in on the important stakeholders and refine that throughout the process. It’s super important to have a great environment for criticism so that required all of us to think outside the box and not have ego about our designs.Amy Elisa: I’m sure everyone had an opinion about the homepage redesign. Did the process ever feel like a game of ping-pong, just bouncing ideas back and forth?Marisa: We did all that competitive research too where we just looked at every search homepage imaginable. Anyone with a search bar on a homepage we print it out and look at it and dissected it. Then we went back to our brand attributes and what our users wanted. Focus groups helped us with that, and the feedback was loud and clear.Amy Elisa: Why change the green to a jewel-toned emerald?Marisa: That was a big discussion. We liked the fact that the color evoked a sense of “go”, as well as emerald tones in general, are just a sign of optimism and opportunity. It felt positive, on trend.Amy Elisa: From a product design perspective, were you excited about the new Glassdoor green? The old color wasn’t ADA compliant and looked different on various screens.Neil: What excited me, even more, was the brand identity that was wrapped up in the color. It wasn’t until we got deep into the weeds and started extracting elements of the work that Marisa and team had started. Seeing all of this juxtaposed, old vs new, we realized, “Wow, the old color is very different.” The opportunities became very clear seeing these two color systems side by side as they were doing the investigation work. The entire product organization saw that there was a lot of opportunities to modernize the entire color system across the product.Marisa: I remember that “a-ha moment” when we were all in a room and we showed a quick preview of the new logo and identity that I have made in the nav and it was like, “Whoa.” Everyone got excited.Amy Elisa: And that a-ha moment is what we hope job seekers and customers will have.Marisa: Globally, it’s going to be nuts. Rolling this out internationally is huge and we’re excited to see how people are going to respond. That is a huge risk to take, but change is good. Change is not scary. Change is a positive thing and it’s going to put us in a better place.Neil: One of the biggest wins for the product design piece of this is when we moved from just simply changing our physical logo to wanting to come up with product expressions of our updated value propositions. Once we started to move into that phase, there were a whole lot of opportunity to recreate our systems; colors, font, spacing, padding, margins, etc.. The vision for our execution was a complete up-tick in the usability, legibility, modernization and overall aesthetic of the site.Amy Elisa: You mentioned risk and how risky this endeavor was especially for you, Marisa, who led the charge even as a new hire. You’re like Mel Gibson in Braveheart.Marisa: I will wear war paint during our All Hands meeting.Amy Elisa: You should! You led the troops all across the org. All those sleepless nights, and I’m sure you had nightmares.Marisa: I have seen the door-shape logo decapitating me slowly.Neil: The momentum Marisa was able to create around getting people excited about the brand again and what it could be…We took that spirit and we injected that into the site redesign and said, “Okay we’re going to put a new face on this company and it’s gonna be sexy!”Marisa: We had long, extensive conversations about who we wanted to be and what our users wanted from us. Then we honed in on our core brand attributes that get to the heart of Glassdoor of helping and empowering people with authentic and trusted insights. Once we had those, they became the glasses through which we saw everything through. That’s the core of how we led the entire company towards this refresh.Amy Elisa: Lessons learned? What did this process teach you, professionally?Marisa: Patience. I came from a tech startup via POPSUGAR where everything was “go time.” I rebranded or refreshed the brand five times, almost once a year. Glassdoor is more calculated. I had to take the steps, prove myself and convince people of what I could do. I had to take baby steps. My team calls me DJ Baby Steps.Amy Elisa: That’s what they call you?Marisa: Yes, as a design team we all had to be patient and lay the groundwork. But the passion has always been there. Now we have a brand that has a renewed spirit behind it with a powerful meaning and a purpose that shows. We embody that purpose to help everyone find a job that they love.Neil: I was reminded about the importance of clarity in the design process around what we’re trying to do, why, and what we are actually trying to solve for our users. Keeping the user top-of-mind is key. Also, I learned to never underestimate the power and passion of our team to do excellent work when they’re drawn to the charge of doing so. We all worked incredibly hard in a short amount of time to bring this to life. Amy Elisa: Any plans on a vacation or getting some R&R after months of 14-hour days and little sleep?Marisa: I’m going to China and Cambodia for two weeks— I call it “The C&C”Neil: Is there a Music Factory component to the C&C?Amy Elisa: There must be for a little ‘90s nostalgia.Neil: My R&R will probably be more down the road because the refresh launches the day that we close on our new house and I’ll be mired in packing, moving. Once we’re settled in, we’ll get up to Tahoe.Marisa: Good. Neil: So much of what we did on the site was incredibly successful and hopefully the metrics continue to prove that, but there’s so much more we can do. From a product perspective, we made massive strides and really did change the way users perceive and engage with the site, but we didn’t update any of the core functionality. Amy Elisa: That can be the next iteration— 2.0.Neil: There’s so much untapped opportunity here. The possibilities are endless.last_img

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first_imgSpain’s Rafael Nadal (L) embraces Austria’s Dominic Thiem after victory at the end of their men’s singles final match on day fifteen of The Roland Garros 2018 French Open tennis tournament in Paris on June 10, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / Eric FEFERBERGBeaten French Open finalist Dominic Thiem hailed Rafael Nadal’s “exceptional” 11th Roland Garros triumph on Sunday, joking that it was easier to watch the great Spaniard on TV as a child.The 24-year-old Austrian was playing in his first Grand Slam final, and although he pushed Nadal at times, he fell to an ultimately one-sided 6-4, 6-3, 6-2 defeat.ADVERTISEMENT China population now over 1.4 billion as birthrate falls Rafael Nadal, master of the impossible MOST READ Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding DepEd’s Taal challenge: 30K students displaced LATEST STORIES Winfrey details her decision to withdraw from Simmons film Dave Chappelle donates P1 million to Taal relief operations Thiem is the only player to have beaten Nadal on clay in the last two years after wins in Madrid this year and Rome in 2017.The world number eight is also one of just three men to have defeated the 17-time Grand Slam champion three times on his favoured surface in total, but he had no answer to the 32-year-old’s relentless pressure on Sunday.“He was playing very well, I think, and there is a reason why he won 11 times here,” Thiem added.“It’s definitely one of the best things somebody ever achieved in sport. For sure, me, I’m confident that this was not my last Grand Slam final, and that’s my biggest goal, to get into the next one and then to do it better than today.“But if you win a Grand Slam tournament 11 times, one single one, then this is just very exceptional and amazing.ADVERTISEMENT Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Weinstein rape trial Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ “You need to have, I think, many extraordinary skills and talents and work ethic to achieve that.”After winning just one point in the first two games, Thiem dragged himself back into the contest, only to throw away the opening set with an erratic 10th game as he was broken to love.Nadal has never lost a best-of-five-set match on clay when he has won the first set, and every time Thiem has faced the world number one the winner of the first set has gone on to take the match.But the seventh seed insisted that his hopes weren’t automatically ended before set two.“It was a bad game, but I did the right plays always, and I just missed some close balls.“And in general… game-wise it was a good game. It was just terrible misses. And it was, for sure, not the turning point.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award “Physically I enjoyed more watching him on the couch,” smiled Thiem, who was 11 years old when Nadal won his first French Open in 2005.“When he won here the first four or five times, I was always watching it. Of course it’s really a great thing that I made my way and that I was competing in a final against him.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown“It’s a really great thing, honestly, but still I’m disappointed, of course. It was a final. I really wanted to win.“I gave everything I had, and I’m the loser of today. So at the end, it’s not the best day.” View commentslast_img

first_imgGIVEN the way Los Angeles City Council President Eric Garcetti has made himself a shill for an LAX-area hotel workers’ union – even to the point of driving business way from the city – we can only assume he’s angling for some prestigious job in Big Labor. And that’s just as well, because Garcetti has damaged his ability to serve as council president beyond repair. It’s unconscionable to think that Los Angeles’ second-most powerful leader would actively try to steer business away from the city. But that’s exactly what Garcetti has done. At the request of UNITE Here, the union that’s trying to organize workers at various hotels around Los Angeles International Airport, Garcetti wrote a letter last week to groups looking to come to L.A. for conventions. In the letter, he urged potential customers to boycott the LAX Hilton in particular and cast doubt on LAX-area hotels in general, citing potential labor unrest, including protests that could shut down nearby streets. These are all taxpaying companies that hire a lot of people and provide valuable services. But singling out Hilton – one of a major companies that still maintains global headquarters in this anti-business city – is beyond belief. Hilton owns 10 hotels here. The LAX Hilton alone pays $5.6 million a year in taxes. Compare that to the massive tax giveaway that Garcetti and his colleagues engineered for a new luxury hotel near the convention center – itself the worst white elephant in city history, gobbling up tens of millions of taxpayer dollars to cover its losses. For an elected official to deliberately try to harm an employer and taxpayer is outrageous, especially when city leaders regularly complain that they lack the funds to pave roads or adequately staff the police department. Worse yet, though, is the ripple effect of Garcetti’s letter. With his note, Garcetti has sent out word that Los Angeles officially sides with labor disruption and opposes the interests of those who provide jobs and invest in the community. He might just as well have told convention planners to take their business to Anaheim or Las Vegas, which is probably what they’ll do. What makes Garcetti’s conduct especially galling is that he was instrumental in agreeing to give $300 million in public subsidies for to the luxury hotel near the Convention Center. Why should taxpayers subsidize the convention business when the City Council president undermines it? Tourism is vital to the Southland economy, bringing in $13 billion a year. It is our golden goose, yet Garcetti is trying to kill it. This is unacceptable from an elected leader who should be working to strengthen our economy, not undermine it. It’s more than just an error in judgment. It’s a reflection of backward priorities. Garcetti should resign as president of the council, and if he doesn’t, the council should remove him. But don’t count it. This is a council that has not shown any more concern for the people of Los Angeles and the well-being of the community than has the man it elected as its leader. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

first_img0Shares0000Manchester City’s Fabian Delph and David Silva show the strain of their shock defeat to Lyon © AFP / Oli SCARFFMANCHESTER, United Kingdom, Sep 20 – Manchester City assistant coach Mikel Arteta admitted his side had only themselves to blame for their shock 2-1 defeat against Lyon on Wednesday.With City manager Pep Guardiola serving a touchline ban, it was Arteta in charge as the Premier League champions suffered a dismal start to their Champions League campaign. Tipped as favourites for the European title, error-prone City were well below their best.First-half goals from Maxwel Cornet and Nabil Fekir punished mistakes from City duo Fabian Delph and Fernandinho.“We saw two very different halves. We conceded many counter-attacks and at this level you get punished,” Arteta said.“If you give cheap goals away it is difficult.”Despite their sloppy performance, Arteta was adamant City would have been worthy of a draw if they had snatched an equaliser.“In the second half we dominated and played in the opponents’ half and created many chances,” he said.“I still believed we could do it. We reacted really well. On another day we could have come back.“The subs affected the game but sometimes it is too late.“It is disappointing. We are usually strong at home. Now you have to go and win away from home.”City are the first English team to lose four successive Champions League matches, a run that includes last season’s three knockout-stage defeats against Basel and Liverpool.Bernardo Silva’s second-half strike gave City hope of a fightback, but their inconsistent efforts spluttered out.Silva admitted City had lacked their usual high tempo and desire.“The first half we were not at our best. We didn’t press with the same intensity we usually do,” he said.“They scored two goals, then in the second half we tried to go after the result.“We were not good enough. And unfortunately we did not want to start this way in the competition but it is what it is and we have to look to the next games.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img

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