first_imgTo help keep the makers of high-quality chocolate from being duped with inferior ingredients, researchers have developed a genetic test that can tell a premium cacao bean from a mediocre impostor. Beans of the cacao plant, the source of cocoa butter and cocoa powder used to make chocolate, can differ widely in appearance, even within the same seed pod (beans within pod, image). So, visually discriminating beans from an exceptional variety from average-tasting beans can be difficult. That poses problems for people in charge of quality control, because unscrupulous bean merchants have ample opportunity to mix in cheaper beans among their premium products. Enter genetics. By analyzing DNA extracted from 30-milligram samples of the seed coat of a cacao bean (which is genetically identical to the tree it comes from), it’s possible to verify whether the bean belongs to a specific variety of cacao. Using the newly developed test, which looked at 48 different genetic markers, researchers were able to discriminate 30 authentic samples of a high-priced cacao variety called Fortunato No. 4 from five other varieties grown in and near Peru and 18 others grown worldwide, they report today in  the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Although DNA analyses can be performed relatively quickly, separating a seed coat from its bean is now rather time-consuming, the researchers say. Future research will focus on streamlining the tests and on developing a technique that can be used to analyze bulk cocoa powder.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img

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first_img MIRACLE There’s a lot that’s been said about the triumph of the human spirit over adversity, and Oshane Murray is living proof of what a person can overcome when the mind kicks into gear. The 23-year-old was on a clear path to achievement as a former Calabar High School student, attending the University of Technology (UTech) pursuing a degree in electrical engineering and representing Jamaica at international and local events in tae kwon do. His life changed on January 30, 2013, when, during a cheerleading routine at UTech, he slipped and fell. “It’s when I was trying to get up I realised that I couldn’t. I didn’t feel a thing. I was very calm and laughing. When I was trying to move, I couldn’t, and everyone was saying ‘Oshane, Oshane, get up now nuh’ and I said ‘I can’t move’ and they were like, ‘Oshane stop joking around’. Then the girls started screaming and there was chaos,” he recalled of that day. He was taken to the hospital, where he learned he had a broken vertebrae in his spine. “The doctors were saying I should be dead based on the X-Ray ;that it’s a miracle I’m a alive and conscious,” he told The Gleaner. After almost a year in hospital, Murray was released. He got an infection a few days before his release, but was deemed well enough to go home just before Christmas 2013. “When I first came home, it was problematic because nobody really knew how to react or how to address me being in this situation. Even though they were trying their best, sometimes them just trying just makes it worse,” Murray said. It was during this period Murray, who turns 24 in May, learned who his real friends were. They turned out to be his teammates, his classmates and some family members. He returned to classes at UTech in September 2015 through the assistance of his coach Jason McKay, who provided him with a driver as well as an assistant, who writes his notes during classes. Exams have proven a little challenging, but he is coping. “I do exams in a room by myself. I draw and I talk, but that’s a next headache in itself. Especially when I have to draw, it’s hard to describe how to draw stuff, especially when you’re doing a lot of calculation courses. Sometimes in the middle of the exams, I get dizzy spells (too).” The thing he said he misses most is the fact that he can no longer train as a martial artist. However, he has found a way to contribute and has returned to training, even if in a different capacity. “I just want to finish what I started … My goal is that I just want to be independent. I don’t know how long it will take, but I will. “I don’t know what’s pushing me but I just don’t want to give up. I don’t know what’s going to happen and that fear of not knowing is what’s pushing me forward,” he said.last_img

first_imgView comments IT happens: Facebook sorry for Xi Jinping’s name mistranslation OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Missile-capable frigate BRP Jose Rizal inches closer to entering PH Navy’s fleet MOST READ Malacañang open to creating Taal Commission 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano Muguruza, however, beat Serena to win the French Open title in 2016. And she’s expecting the same kind of atmosphere despite the unfamiliar opponent.“I don’t think it’s going to be different. A final is a final,” Muguruza said. “Only one’s going to win. … The racket has to talk.”Besides her experience on the court, Muguruza will also have some experience behind her off it. She has been working with 1994 Wimbledon champion Conchita Martinez recently.“I think she’s helping me to deal with the stress of the tournament, because it’s a long tournament,” Muguruza said. “So she just knows how to prepare, how to train, what to do.“Not that I’m doing something different, honestly. But to have her by my side gives me also this little confidence on having someone that has won before.”Williams and Muguruza have played each other four times before, and the American has won three of them. They have never before played on grass, though.“It’s good that she’s played her before, and that she’s beaten her. So she knows what’s to come,” Martinez said of Saturday’s match. “She just has to play tennis, and not worry about who’s favored or who isn’t favored. She needs to think about the next point and nothing else.”When Martinez won at Wimbledon for her only major, she beat 37-year-old Martina Navratilova in the final. Williams is the oldest Wimbledon finalist since then.Age, however, seems to be an advantage for Williams.“I think it’s wonderful to have the opportunity to play well and to be strong and have experience,” Williams said. “So I think experience can either work against you or for you. I like to think it’s working for me.” Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ Venus Williams of the United States returns to Britain’s Johanna Konta during their Women’s Singles semifinal match on day nine at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London Thursday, July 13, 2017. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)LONDON — Even at 37 and with five Wimbledon titles to her name, Venus Williams still has that overwhelming desire to win.And she’s showing it again this year at the All England Club, where she will face Garbine Muguruza on Saturday in her ninth Wimbledon final.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextcenter_img Duterte’s ‘soft heart’ could save ABS-CBN, says election lawyer Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend LATEST STORIES “I’m definitely in the position I want to be in,” Williams said. “It’s a long two weeks. Now, knocking on the door for a title. This is where I want to be.”Williams has quite a history at the grass-court major, winning her first Grand Slam title in London in 2000. The last of her seven majors came at the same place in 2008.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’Shortly after that, in 2011, Williams announced she had Sjogren’s disease, an energy-sapping illness that also can cause joint pain. She missed some big tournaments, and made several early exits at the majors.But she has bounced back, playing some of her best tennis over the last 12 months. She reached the Wimbledon semifinals last year, and the Australian Open final this year. Dy: We don’t think of ourselves as reserves On Saturday, she’ll be playing for the Venus Rosewater Dish for the ninth time in her 20th Wimbledon appearance.“There’s still a lot to be done. I have one more match that I’d like to be the winner of,” Williams said. “I have to go out there and take it and play well.”The person on the other side of the net also has experience playing in the last weekend on Centre Court. The 23-year-old Muguruza played for the title in 2015, losing to Venus’ little sister, Serena Williams.Serena isn’t at Wimbledon this year because she is pregnant and taking the rest of the season off. But Venus will likely be checking in with her for some advice ahead of Saturday’s match.“Serena did play her in a final,” Venus said. “I definitely will ask her. I’m sure she’s going to give me hopefully some things that will make a difference for me in the match.”ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LIVE: Sinulog 2020 Grand Paradelast_img

first_imgA man who previously spent 56 months in prison after being convicted for larceny on Monday appeared before the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts, this time for allegedly stealing a motorcycle.Randy Joseph, 34, of Lot 24 Country Road, Buxton, East Coast Demerara, denied that on January 8, 2018 at Waterloo Street, Georgetown, he stole one motorcycle valued $245,000, property of Godfrey Abel.Police Prosecutor Dellon Sullivan objected to bail being granted to the accused based on the seriousness of the offence. He revealed that the Virtual Complainant (VC) went to Waterloo Street where he parked his motorcycle and went into a hotel.However, when he returned, his motorcycle was nowhere to be found. As such, the matter was reported to the Police.A number of days later, the defendant was stopped on the said motorcycle with registration number CJ 664 and he failed to provide the Police with the relevant documents.As such, he was taken to the Vigilance Police Station where he was charged with the offence.Magistrate Judy Latchman remanded the defendant to prison until January 29, 2018 when he would next appear in court.last_img

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