Raiders’ Gruden promises changes on defense

first_imgALAMEDA — In absence of specifics, Jon Gruden offered a promise regarding his struggling defense.“We’ve got to play better, and we’re going to play better, and there will be changes,” Gruden said Monday at his weekly press conference. “There will be changes. What happened yesterday will not happen again. I can’t allow it to happen.”Sounds reasonable the day after the Raiders gave up 552 yards and 9.4 yards per play in a 42-21 loss to the Tennessee Titans. Tennessee came in as a middle of …last_img read more

Ardi Party Is Over

first_imgThe hubbub over Ardipithecus (10/02/2009) may have been premature.  Despite 600 pages of material submitted to Science in October, many doubts and questions remain about the status of this hominin, or hominid, or whatever it was (the nomenclature is confusing and inconsistent even among paleoanthropologists).  In an article by Katherine Harmon in the pro-evolutionary magazine Scientific American, so many doubts are evident that laymen should seriously question whether this fossil suggests anything about human origins.   In brief, here are some key issues:Debate:  Ardi has “sharpened more differences than it has smoothed over.”Manipulation:  William Jungers (Stony Brook U) criticized Tim White’s team for overstating interpretations.  “I think some of the things they said might have been for effect,” he claimed.Negative evidence:  Even White himself does not claim that Ardi demonstrates linkage to humans.  Harmon wrote, “White and his fellow authors do not propose to have a definitive answer, but through painstaking analysis of the fossil data and surroundings, they conclude in the overview paper that, ‘There are no apparent features sufficiently unique to warrant the exclusion of Ar. ramidus as being ancestral to Australopithecus,’ thus proposing she might indeed be an early hominin (the ever-changing nomenclatural group that usually includes living humans and our close extinct relatives, also referred to by White et al. as hominids—although the latter title now often includes the great apes, as well).”Rotation:  Key to the claim that Ardi walked upright is the position of the ilium.  Rotating the ilium can lead to mistaken interpretations.  Jungers said, “It’s very difficult not to make them look like something you have in your mind if there’s any chance of play.” Harmon mentioned that “Despite the numerous images and descriptions put forth by the researchers, others are reluctant to take the reconstructions without a grain of salt.”Faculty:  Humans are obligate bipeds, but facultative tree climbers.  If Ardi was a facultative biped and obligate tree climber, as her divergent big toe indicates, she may have been no different in her transport habits than chimpanzees.  No knee joint was found in the Ardipithecus specimens.  This also confuses the interpretation.Social studies:  White and the supporters of Ardi argue that the teeth show little sexual dimorphism.  What does this mean?  They take it to mean that males were not larger and more aggressive, which means that they might have helped care for the young, which seems kind of human-like.  This reasoning is very subjective.Face book:  So what if Ardi’s face was not as protruding as that of apes?  Harmon explained, “outside researchers focus on the similarity in size to other nonhuman primates, such as extinct Miocene epoch apes.”Combination plate:  Tim White prefers to look at the combination of features that make Ardi unique, instead of focusing on piecemeal analysis of each part.  This raises questions, however, about the value of his own painstaking descriptions of those parts.  David Begun (U of Toronto) also opined that it could mean Ar. ramidus had nothing to do with human evolutionary history.  In Ardi he finds “very little in the anatomy of this specimen that leads directly to Australopithecus, then to Homo sapiens.  This could very easily be a side branch.”About the only thing they agree on is the amount of detail White’s team put into the description of the fossil is commendable.  Jungers considers the work a “new standard” that is “truly extraordinary.”  That aspect, however, affirms nothing about the interpretation of its place in human evolution.  It might only serve to elucidate the sophistication of their subjectivity.*Sigh.*  The Darwin Party song and dance is getting so tiring.  Lots of old apes and monkeys went extinct.  Who cares about another?  Considering the rivalries and ambitions among the paleoanthropologists, and the ever-changing stories, and the leeway for fudging that exists, why do we even pay these guys any attention?  Here at CEH we have to, in order to forestall the misguidance of the public that results from one-party rule in Science.    In support of that criticism, let us remind you of Tim White’s own cautions about how distorted bones can mislead even the experts (see 03/28/2003).  Let us remind you that Nature accused Tim White’s storytelling proclivities as “more philosophy than fossils” (04/27/2006).  Let us remind you that variability within humans can swamp interpretations of putative ancestral traits (07/22/2007).  And to reinforce the subjectivity of their art, let us remind you of Leslie Hlusko’s debunking of three common presumptions anthropologists use when interpreting alleged hominid bones (02/19/2004).  If you follow this stuff, consider it sport or entertainment – not science.(Visited 24 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

LaVar Ball on why son Lonzo is perfect for Lakers: ‘They really don’t have a leader’

first_imgRobredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games “Team-wise, the Lakers are a better fit,” the outspoken patriarch said during CSN’s “Celtics Talk” podcast, as relayed by Bleacher Report.“They really don’t have a leader. Boston already went to the playoffs. They have a leader,” he said, pertaining to the Celtics who holds the first selection.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutDuring an exclusive workout with the Lakers earlier this week, Lonzo said the same thing and described himself as “a leader and a point guard”  that would fill the team’s needs moving forward.READ: Lonzo Ball works out for Lakers, would love to be no. 2 pick 1 dead in Cavite blast, fire Cavs, Warriors will get physical as NBA Finals tension boils MOST READ WATCH: Firefighters rescue baby seal found in parking garage LATEST STORIES Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ What ‘missteps’? NBA prospect Lonzo Ball speaks with the media after a workout with the Los Angeles Lakers at Toyota Sports Center on June 7, 2017 in El Segundo, California. Image: Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images/AFPFollowing several conflicting reports regarding the Los Angeles Lakers’ interest with blue chip prospect Lonzo Ball, his father LaVar once again chimed in on why his son would be better off in Purple and Gold.With the Lakers picking second in the 2017 NBA Draft next week, June 22, LaVar described the former UCLA Bruin as the leader that the team desperately needs.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img The father and son duo, meanwhile, hasn’t been shy at all on airing their preference to stay close to their home in California.“All I said was that my boy is going to play for the Lakers, and I’m going to speak it into existence,” LaVar told ESPN last February. “I want him to be a Laker, but I wasn’t saying he’s only going to play for the Lakers.”It remains unclear whether Lonzo will indeed be a Laker or not, but all eyes will certainly be on him come next Thursday. Khristian Ibarrola/JBRELATED STORY:Nike wants Lonzo Ball, but not for father’s asking price of $1BADVERTISEMENT Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ World’s 50 Best Restaurants launches new drinking and dining guide View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

Here’s The Best Explanation We’ve Seen For Louisville Coach Bobby Petrino’s Timeout

first_imgBobby Petrino calls an inexplicable timeout vs. Florida State.YouTubeIf you’re like us, you’re still absolutely baffled regarding what happened at the end of the Louisville vs. Auburn game in Atlanta. For those who missed it, Cardinals head coach Bobby Petrino called his team’s final timeout with 52 seconds to play, despite Auburn having just been charged with a holding penalty that negated a first down. Here’s video:Well, Fox Sports’ Joel Klatt has the best explanation we’ve seen. Basically, because the run went for a first down, Louisville was forced to accept the holding penalty. Because the penalty was a live-ball foul, the play clock, by rule, was set to 25 seconds, and was to be started on the referee’s signal. By that logic, Petrino made a mistake calling timeout, as only 25 seconds, not 40, would have run off of the clock. Instead, because of the timeout, Auburn ran its third down play, and the play clock then reset at 40 seconds. As Klatt notes, it’s not as huge a mistake as originally thought. But Louisville would have gotten the ball back.To clarify the end of Louisville game…run play went for first down, but holding was called and Louisville had to accept the penalty….— Joel Klatt (@joelklatt) September 5, 2015clock was going to start on the ready for play with 25 second play clock…would have taken the game clock down to around 24 seconds….— Joel Klatt (@joelklatt) September 5, 2015Auburn would have had to punt with 24 seconds left and Louisville would have had their timeout left…thats why Petrino said “I screwed up”— Joel Klatt (@joelklatt) September 5, 2015by taking the timeout before the third down then the play clock after the play was 40 seconds leaving inside of 5 seconds for 4th down— Joel Klatt (@joelklatt) September 5, 2015confusion was surrounding officials announcement that their wasn’t 10 second runoff which applies only to penalties that prevent the snap…— Joel Klatt (@joelklatt) September 5, 2015or intentional grounding and illegal forward passes…holding does not create a 10 second runoff situation…SO, it was ill-advised to take— Joel Klatt (@joelklatt) September 5, 2015the TO but it was not egregious— Joel Klatt (@joelklatt) September 5, 2015It’s certainly a confusing rule, and perhaps one that should be looked at. Either way, the confusion cost Louisville this afternoon.last_img read more

Jerry Garcia Foundation Promotes Butterfly And Bee Preservation

first_imgThe Jerry Garcia Foundation will once again take part in Dead & Company’s Charity Outreach Initiative at the Participation Row Charity Village as part of this summer’s concert tour.Butterfly Study: Watercolor by Jerry GarciaThis year, the nonprofit organization hopes to inspire butterfly garden plantings and interactive art in partnership with the Save Our Monarchs Foundation.The Jerry Garcia Foundation will distribute free butterfly garden seeds and pollinator seeds to the first 300 people at each concert who visit their tent at the Participation Row Charity Village on the concert tour. The audience is invited to participate in a new interactive art project by posting photos of their gardens and nature on the Jerry Garcia Foundation Facebook Page. The photos will be added to a visual art collage and shared on social media with the tags: #SaveOurMonarchs #SaveOurBees #RippleEffect.“Save Our Monarchs has generously donated thousands of Non-GMO milkweed seed packets and pollinator garden seeds to the Jerry Garcia Foundation. We are sharing these seeds in hopes that gardens will be planted to nourish butterfly and bee populations across the US,” said Keelin Garcia, Jerry’s youngest daughter and Co-Founder of the Jerry Garcia Foundation.The Save Our Monarchs Foundation is a grassroots organization devoted to the preservation of the Monarch butterflies, primarily by planting milkweed plants, which are the Monarch caterpillar’s only source of sustenance.Participation Row is a charity outreach program initiated by the nonprofits REVERB and HeadCount. The program invites environmentally and socially responsible organizations to highlight their charitable activities in a tent village at each concert on the tour.“We are grateful to Dead and Company, Reverb and HeadCount for their continued support and the invitation to participate in this charity outreach program. Jerry was an environmentalist who advocated for the preservation of the rainforests and the coral reefs. It is a blessing to continue this work in his honor,” said Manasha Garcia, Jerry’s wife and Co-founder of the Jerry Garcia Foundation.The Jerry Garcia Foundation has invited the following nonprofit partners to attend Participation Row as charity guests: Alive Inside Foundation, Bread and Roses Presents, Fender Music Foundation, Friends of the Uptown, Hard Rock Heals Foundation, HoneyLove Urban Beekeepers, One Percent for the Planet, Playing for Change Foundation, Psylodelic Gallery, Save Our Monarchs Foundation, Shimer College Great Books, WildCare and WhyHunger.The Dead & Company Band features the Grateful Dead musicianship of Bob Weir, Mickey Hart, and Bill Kreutzmann along with guitarist/vocalist John Mayer, bassist Oteil Burbridge, and keyboardist Jeff Chimenti.Bob Weir, Grateful Dead Co-Founder, is an advisory board member of the Jerry Garcia Foundation.last_img read more

Where Cheerleading Ranks in Safety Among High School Sports

Cheerleading falls in the middle of the pack. The total concussion rate across all girls sports is 41 concussions per 100,000 competition athlete exposures; cheerleading has a rate that’s about three-tenths of that.But when we factor in concussions accumulated in practice, we see something interesting. In every sport except cheerleading, the rate drops steeply — concussions in practice happen about one-sixth as often as concussions in competition. Cheerleading was the only sport of the 20 surveyed that had a higher risk of concussion in practice (14 per 100,000) than in competition (12 per 100,000).“When we delve into the data more closely, we can actually find out where practice-related concussions are occurring,” Comstock said. “With cheerleading, they’re occurring all over the place. They’re occurring on asphalt, on grass, on tile. And if you think about it, if cheerleading isn’t considered a sport, [it] may not be afforded the same resources — even for practice — as other sports.”Here’s Comstock’s theory on why the injury rate is higher during practice: If cheerleading isn’t officially designated as a sport at a school, there are better odds that the team isn’t practicing on athletic mats and instead setting up in, say, a parking lot or school cafeteria. In competition, however, the students are likely to be on proper mats and therefore less likely to be at risk for getting a concussion. The reports from the 2011 catastrophic injury study at UNC seem to back this up; a high number of the injuries seem to occur both during practice and also as a result of contact with a hard surface.What does that mean? “Recognizing cheerleading as a sport may actually make the sport safer because they should then be given a designated space to practice,” Comstock said. Official sport status means that money, equipment and resources come from schools, not necessarily from the cheerleaders themselves or alternative sources.Is there a difference in concussion and injury rates between the 35 states that have made cheerleading a sport and the 15 that haven’t? We don’t know, because the data doesn’t exist for that kind of determination yet. But Comstock’s team is working on it.Although the raw-injury count in cheerleading may tell a headline-grabbing story, it’s important to look at those numbers in context. Yes, catastrophic injuries happen, as do concussions. But keeping in mind that a lot of kids are cheerleading — and that every day we may take risks that have even grimmer statistics — we can get a better picture of the actual risks involved. Think of a dangerous high school sport, and football is probably the first that comes to mind. You might not think of those students in uniform on the sidelines, cheering for the players.And yet cheerleading isn’t as safe as you might think, which was one of the reasons New York State — following 34 other states and Washington, D.C. — reclassified it as an official school sport last month.Media coverage of the New York decision largely focused on athlete safety — in some cases referring to cheerleading as one of the most dangerous sports. The raw statistic that cheerleading accounts for two-thirds of all catastrophic injuries among female high school athletes was repeated by news outlets across New York.1Consider: New York’s CBS Local, The Buffalo News, the New York State Sportswriters Association, The Wall Street Journal, MyFoxNY, The Suffolk Times, The Daily Gazette, the Times Union, etc. Some, like The Wall Street Journal here, showed an iteration of a chart similar to this:The data for this chart was pulled from the 29th annual report from the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research, an independent research body at the University of North Carolina.2This 2011 report, written by Frederick O. Muller of UNC and Robert C. Cantu of Emerson Hospital in Massachusetts, contains a section on cheerleading. The center classifies catastrophic injuries as either “serious,” “nonfatal” or “fatal.” An injury is considered serious when it’s severe but has no ongoing functional disability. For example, a 17-year-old cheerleader in 1998 attempted a back flip, slipped on wet artificial turf and landed on her head, shocking her spinal cord and causing temporary paralysis. Nonfatal injuries lead to permanent disabilities. Fatal injuries need no explanation.But it’s not the raw numbers that should scare people. (These numbers are misleading, as I’ll explain in a bit.) Rather, it’s how these cheerleaders are getting injured that should warrant concern.Cheerleading is different from every other high school sport (for which there is injury-tracking data) in one critical way: More cheerleaders are getting injured during practice than in competition. And that’s why cheerleading’s official designation as a sport could go a long way toward reducing the number of injuries that make it risky.The earliest incarnation of high school cheerleading — think girls in school-letter sweaters and thick skirts encouraging a football team — has morphed into a hypercompetitive and acrobatic institution. And all the flips, throws, jumps and human pyramids have resulted in more injuries. A lot more injuries. That’s why it has been seductive for media organizations to report raw numbers.But it’s the rate of injury that matters.3To determine the rate, we can divide the number of injuries in a given period by the number of participants in that given period, and multiply by 100,000 to determine the injury rate per 100,000 participants.A rate makes a world of difference in how people interpret dangers and risks. For example, if I told you there were 179 unprovoked shark attacks in the U.S. from 2006 to 2010, you might get frightened. But when I turn that into a rate — by factoring in that 200 million people visit beaches every year, and they visit multiple times — it shows that the probability of being attacked by a shark is one in 11.5 million. That’s much less frightening.Similarly, when we factor in how many high-schoolers are participating in cheerleading, we get a different perspective on “the most dangerous sport” narrative.4Finding participation numbers for cheerleading isn’t easy, especially because for decades, it wasn’t considered a sport (and still isn’t in many states) and thus keeping a tally on athletes wasn’t necessarily required. The authors of the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research report admitted difficulty in finding an accurate number of competitive cheerleaders, which is crucial for determining a rate.The authors of the report I referred to earlier cited two participation numbers in cheerleading. A 2009 news release by the National Federation of State High School Associations said there were 400,000 high school cheerleaders in the U.S. (The number, however, didn’t distinguish between competitive and noncompetitive cheerleaders.) A 2010-11 high school participation survey showed significantly lower participation: 96,718 girls and 2,846 boys for a total of nearly 100,000 participants in competitive cheerleading squads.The authors decided to go with the 100,000 count in estimating the rate of injury. Because there was one catastrophic injury that school year, they said the effective rate was one catastrophic injury per 100,000 participants. Had they gone with the more inclusive estimate, they would get 0.25 catastrophic injuries per 100,000 participants. A couple of years earlier, study co-author Frederick Mueller told The Washington Post that he estimated the rate from 1982 to 2007 to be 2.68 catastrophic injuries per 100,000 high school participants, a figure derived by dividing the 67 known catastrophic injuries by an estimate of 2.5 million high school cheerleaders over the 25 years. Compare those rates with these other high school sports:It’s crucial to get perspective on these numbers. Let’s assume that Mueller’s estimate — 2.68 catastrophic injuries for every 100,000 high school cheerleaders — is accurate. In comparison, each year 17.9 of every 100,000 New York state residents are hospitalized for traffic-related pedestrian injuries — nearly seven times higher than the upper-bound catastrophic-injury rate for high school cheerleaders. So, even if cheerleading is the most dangerous high school sport, it might be less dangerous than walking to work.But what about more common, non-catastrophic injuries, like concussions?Dawn Comstock, a professor at the Colorado School of Public Health in Denver, runs High School RIO, a national database that has monitored 20 high school sports since 2005. She referred me to a 2012 paper published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine. The paper, based on High School RIO data, looked at concussions among high school athletes — where they occurred (in practice or competition) and in what sport — as well as participation rates during the 2008-10 school years. The finding?“Cheerleading is not nearly as dangerous a sport as some of the previous research painted it to be,” Comstock said. “It has the 10th-highest concussion rate of the 20.”Concussions are a compelling data set for tracking the dangers of a sport because they’re relatively common, and yet they’re severe enough to be reported (as opposed to, say, sprains and strains). But they often don’t have long-term impact. Here are the competition concussion rates per 100,000 athlete exposures:5An athlete exposure is defined as one athlete participating in one game or practice. Boys Volleyball was not included in the chart because no concussions were reported. read more

Tennis Is Growing Old With Federer Nadal And The Williams Sisters

Today’s tennis fans are spoiled. They have watched Serena Williams, Venus Williams, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, four of the best tennis players of all time, dominate the sport for a decade, winning a combined total of 60 majors in their careers. Now the four are old by the sport’s historical standards — all are at least 30, and only Nadal is under 35 — but instead of fading away like their predecessors, they’ve dragged the sport along with them. This weekend’s Australian Open finals are Grand Slam showcases of their longevity: Williams vs. Williams IX on Saturday and Federer vs. Nadal IX on Sunday. The mid-30s is past closing time for most tennis greats, and all four have declined. Combined they’ve won just one title at the last five majors. But they’ve remained remarkably competitive, regularly beating their younger peers and threatening to go all the way once more. Two of them will do so this weekend. Federer and Nadal benefited from early exits by No. 1 Andy Murray and No. 2 Novak Djokovic but also knocked out five of the top 10 seeds themselves. The Williams sisters had easier paths to the final, after many of their inconsistent younger rivals lost early. All four have looked like their best selves for long stretches at this tournament, outplaying and outlasting younger opponents.Now Serena Williams will go for an Open-era record 23rd major title, while Venus will seek her eighth, and her first since 2008. Federer will try to extend his lead over Nadal in the career major title count to four; Nadal will try to narrow it to two.By historical standards, what Nadal is doing is remarkable; what the other three are doing is almost unheard of. Federer is the oldest men’s Grand Slam finalist since Ken Rosewall more than 40 years ago. Whichever Williams sister wins will be the oldest woman to do so in the Open era, surpassing Serena’s record, first set at Wimbledon in 2015 and extended in last year’s Wimbledon.How are they defying the laws of aging? Partly, the sport has aged around them. Veterans have gotten smarter about diet, conditioning, practice and scheduling. Their biggest rivals (Angelique Kerber, Maria Sharapova, Murray and Djokovic) are themselves 29. None of them made the semifinals in Australia (Sharapova is serving a doping suspension that ends in April), but two of the other four players who did are in their 30s; the other two are 25. The next generation of players hasn’t broken through.But in large part, the four greats are the reason tennis has aged. When they were young, they dominated, and tennis seemed young. Now they’re old — and tennis is, too. All-time greats, even after they’ve been diminished by age, often remain great, as did Peyton Manning, Wilt Chamberlain and Hank Aaron. Tennis’s oldsters remain four of the main faces of the sport. Federer by himself has accomplished about as much at majors since turning 32 as has every man 27 and younger combined. By contrast, the average age of men’s major semifinalists was under 27 each year from 1987 to 2011.Andy Roddick provides an instructive contrast. He’s a year younger than Federer and has 16 fewer Grand Slams, yet he retired more than four years ago, unable to continue competing at the very top of the sport. At a press conference in Australia this week about his induction into the sport’s hall of fame, Roddick marveled that his peers were still going. “What Roger’s doing and maintaining at 35 years old, what Venus and Serena are still doing …,” Roddick said. “Everyone here is going to talk about it in every story they write for the rest of this tournament, and I still don’t know if that’s enough. It’s pretty amazing.”There’s no guarantee that this will last. No one can spot the last hurrah in advance. Rod Laver won all four majors in 1969, the year he turned 31 — and then never reached another major semifinal. Andre Agassi, at age 35, led Federer in the 2005 U.S. Open final and then never reached another major fourth round and retired a year later. Martina Navratilova reached the 1994 Wimbledon final at age 37 and then played just two more majors in a brief comeback bid a decade later. But there isn’t much sense in writing off any of this weekend’s finalists. Others have done so before and turned out to be way premature.After clinching her spot in the final, Venus Williams said aging has been good for the sport, which gets to keep its headliners headlining finals for longer. “I think people realize this is an amazing job, so it’s best to keep it,” she said at a press conference. “I think this generation is going to inspire the rest of the generations to, obviously, play a schedule that’s achievable, sustainable, and that you can play Grand Slam tennis for a long time. This is beautiful for the game because it will be able to retain its stars for a long time, which is a great business model.” After all, no matchups are easier to market than Williams vs. Williams and Federer vs. Nadal. read more

Healthy Buckeyes seek revenge

Injuries are never beneficial to any team. At times, however, they can have a funny effect.In the case of the Ohio State men’s basketball team, injuries, both this season and last, have allowed the Buckeyes to come together in times of despair. It has also allowed players who usually wouldn’t get playing opportunities to gain experience.With a highly anticipated matchup against No. 11 West Virginia on Saturday, the Buckeyes remember the beat down they received from the Mountaineers last season.One difference, however, is that OSU faced injuries shortly before last year’s matchup with West Virginia. This season, it appears they have successfully come back from one.The Buckeyes started 9-0 last season before losing forward David Lighty to a foot injury against Jacksonville.Reeling from his injury, and trying to find players to replace him, OSU staggered into the matchup with WVU and was pounded, 76-48.For this season’s matchup, OSU is finally healthy, and these injuries might have given the Buckeyes their best chance at revenge against their boarding opponent.When Lighty went down with a broken foot, the Buckeyes were in desperate need of a leader.Insert Evan Turner.The guard quickly became the team’s most prolific player and hasn’t stopped since. Having to lead the Buckeyes made Turner grow up fast under fire. As for the void in playing time, that was filled by freshman guard William Buford.Buford used his extended playing time to have a promising first season.Coach Thad Matta seems to share the sentiment that even in traumatic situations, a team can get better and grow.“I use William [Buford] as a good example,” Matta said. “When David [Lighty] went down, it was the situation of, ‘Hey Will, you just went from playing 20 minutes to 35 minutes whether you like it or not,’ and I thought he had a great freshman year. Really across the board I thought we’ve done a really good job.”After three consecutive wins in conference, it looks as if the Buckeyes have hit their stride as they prepare for a rematch with the Mountaineers.Matta said OSU is clearly deeper, and guys such as seniors P.J. Hill and Jeremie Simmons add depth and experience this season, since they started last year.“Obviously we would have loved having Evan [Turner] all the games this year,” junior guard Jon Diebler said. “It forces guys to elevate their game especially in aspects that maybe they aren’t used to doing.“But now that he’s back, to keep playing at the level we’re at and adding a guy who is one of the best players in the country … you know it’s just a good feeling.”Getting Turner back and having him play at such a high level again is a bonus for an Ohio State team that has quickly positioned itself back in the thick of the Big Ten.Things seem to finally be falling back into place for the Buckeyes. Luckily, their most important games are still ahead of them.“I think we obviously had to step up our game,” junior center Dallas Lauderdale said. “I don’t think we wanted to fall back and be complacent. We wanted to keep our game at a high level.” read more

Mascherano equals Zanetti as Argentinas mostcapped player

first_imgJavier Mascherano made his 143rd international appearance for Argentina in Tuesday’s 4-0 win against Haiti and equalled Javier Zanetti as the nation’s most-capped playerThe former Barcelona defender was honoured before the start of the match at Buenos Aires and was one of only five players in the line-up that was also part of the 6-1 humiliation against Spain in March with Gonzalo Higuain, Nicolas Otamendi, Nicolas Tagliafico and Giovani Lo Celso also being retained by head coach Jorge Sampaoli.?????? @Mascherano recognized for making his 143rd @Argentina cap tonigh, tying him for most all-time in the country’s illustrious history. pic.twitter.com/CP2YU4Gr5R— beIN SPORTS USA (@beINSPORTSUSA) May 29, 2018Raheem Sterling, EnglandTop 5 best players from the international break weekend Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 11, 2019 After a fresh international break just came to an end, we need to talk about the Top 5 best players during this whole weekend.We…Mascherano made his debut at international level for Argentina in 2003 in a friendly against Uruguay and is set to take part in his fourth World Cup this summer in Russia.The 33-year-old left Barcelona for Chinese club Hebei China Fortune back in January and scored his first goal for the club in a Chinese FA Cup game against Shandong Luneng Taishan on May 2.Argentina now fly to Barcelona to prepare for World Cup matches against Iceland on June 16, Croatia on June 21 and Nigeria on June 26.last_img read more

Ballon dOr round 2 between Luka Modric and Antoine Griezmann

first_imgThis Wednesday we get the second round in the Ballon d’Or race between Real Madrid midfielder Luka Modric, and Atletico Madrid forward Antoine Griezmann. We got a great match this Wednesday for all of you, the European Supercup between Real Madrid and Atletico will take place, and we are excited for the second round of the Ballon d’Or race between Luka Modric and Antoine Griezmann. Yes, you read correctly. We are convinced that this season will be the first one that doesn’t have Leo Messi or Cristiano Ronaldo as the Ballon d’Or winner and we think that Luka and Antoine will take their place as the first player to win it ten years after a long reign from both giants. Neither Cristiano not Lio were able to win the World Cup with their national teams this summer, plus France won the competition and the Ballon d’Or is delivered by French magazine ‘France Football’. It really is a no-brainer.? ¡Nuestros 29 convocados para la Supercopa de Europa! #RMSuperCup pic.twitter.com/7LFy5IUaoL— Real Madrid C.F. (@realmadrid) August 13, 2018In fact, we actually think that there is even a small chance of Leo Messi not even getting into the podium of this year’s award and Cristiano Ronaldo finishing third in the voting. If this happens it would really be a huge change in the football landscape, we could very well be on the brink a new era in which other players are considered to win the coveted award instead of that duopoly dominated by M10 and CR7. But in order to get that result by the end of the season and see a different player being recognized with the Ballon d’Or, first we need either Luka Modric or Antoine Griezmann to deliver more consistent performances apart from the World Cup they had where the French forward won the collective accolade and Modric got the individual recognition as the best player in the competition.? Tallin. ? Un derbi. ? La #Supercopa en juego.¡VAMOS, ATLETI! ?⚪??#AúpaAtleti #RealMadridAtleti pic.twitter.com/3JDL9ZGigL— Atlético de Madrid (@Atleti) August 14, 2018Sergio Ramos, Real MadridZidane reveals Sergio Ramos injury concern for Real Madrid Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Zinedine Zidane has put Sergio Ramos’ availability for Real Madrid’s trip to Sevilla next weekend in doubt after withdrawing him against Levante.Modric and Griezmann’s best aspects to win the Ballon d’Or.Now, to have a better understanding of how great of a chance each of these players have to actually win the individual award by the end of the season, first we have to take a look at what each of them accomplished with their club and country. Antoine Griezmann has the better shot at the prize because of the two group trophies he got with Atletico Madrid and France, he won the World Cup with his national team and the UEFA Europa League with the Colchoneros by scoring goals in each of the two finals. That alone could be the deciding factor for Antoine to win the award, but Modric also completed an outstanding season with both Real Madrid and the Croatia National Team.Ne lâchez rien !! ???? pic.twitter.com/096kRlZDrJ— Antoine Griezmann (@AntoGriezmann) July 21, 2018The Croatian midfielder was not only the best player in the World Cup, he also made the case to be considered the best midfielder of 2018 given the various accomplishments he had with Real Madrid and also leading his country to a World Cup final as a true underdog of the competition. With Los Blancos this season, Luka Modric wasn’t able to take his team to win La Liga or the Copa del Rey, but he had a fantastic Champions League season where he won the third consecutive playing for Los Blancos after they defeated Liverpool in the final. Modric played fantastic football alongside German midfielder Toni Kroos with Real Madrid, this leaves today’s European Supercup performance with everything still in play and it gives both players a chance to make a case for themselves in from of all the Ballon d’Or voters.Back to work! ⚽️? pic.twitter.com/c3mAvc93VO— Luka Modrić (@lukamodric10) August 10, 2018Who do you think has a better chance at winning the Ballon d’Or, Luka Modric or Antoine Griezmann? Please share your opinion in the comment section down below.last_img read more