Gear Hacks: Make Your Own DIY LED Bar Light

first_imgLooking for more DIY action? We’ve got you covered!Got any DIY lighting tips/techniques/tricks you’d like to share? Do so in the comments below! Make your very own DIY LED bar light! It’s surprisingly simple and cheap thanks to this quick in-depth video tutorial.Production guru David Mudre recently shined a light on an affordable DIY LED bar light setup that he’s put to use in several of his projects. At just over ten minutes, the video tutorial is well worth your time for its solid lighting advice and excellent procedural walkthrough. If you’re interested in lighting interviews and narratives without cleaning out your bank account, give this video a watch.The four-foot long LED light he utilizes is also available in a two-foot long version for a fraction of the price. Pick the one that’s right for your location and environment. At 4000 Kelvin, this light can be used as an edge light or a key light. With no power cable directly attached to the device, Mudre teaches you how to wire a cable directly into the light.To do this, you just need to pop the actual light off from the plastic base, run the cable through the hole in the bottom, and connect the power. You’ll need to pop the side connector off to run the cable out of the side so it doesn’t stick out on the bottom.Once you have the light hooked up to power, you can mount it in the appropriate manner off the ground. To hold the light up parallel to the ground, you’ll need two light stands and two clamps. The clamps can be screwed to the top of the light poles.For attaching the light to a C-stand, you’ll need to purchase a a 4″ bolt with two nuts and two washers. Once you’ve fashioned the bolt together, you can pop it through the bottom of the light using a screwdriver and hammer or “anything heavy to hit it with.”After you’ve made the hole, just slide the bolt through, tighten the nuts up, and fasten the bolt in a secure way. Once the bolt is firmly in the light, pop the actual LED back into the frame and mount it to your C-stand.Supplies Needed:4 ft. Utilitech Pro Strip Shop Light – Price: $34.981/2” x 4″ Hex Bolt – Price: $1.841/2 x 1 1/2 Fender Washers (25 Pack) – Price: $6.58We did it!last_img read more

Two orphaned tiger cubs die of viral infection

first_imgTwo orphaned tiger cubs died of a viral infection at Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve in Madhya Pradesh, a forest official said today.One of the cubs died at around midnight yesterday and the other succumbed this morning, Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve’s field director Mridul Pathak said.Both the cubs were four months’ old.They were among the three cubs found on January 22 this year at Sarwahi village on the periphery of the Sanjay Gandhi Tiger Reserve in the state.The poachers had killed the mother of the cubs.Later, the three cubs were shifted to Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve to be put in foster care, he said.“We tried our best to save the cubs who were infected with parvovirus. This virus generally infects dogs, but it infected the cubs here. The doctors from Panna and Jabalpur were called and proper medicines were also administered to the felines but they could not be saved,” Pathak said.The third cub also has the infection and a team of doctors is trying to save the feline, he added.last_img read more

A school too far

first_imgPune: When Bapusaheb Jangam visits his grandsons, he clambers down from the clifftop Raireshwar fort in Pune’s Bhor tehsil, where the family lives, to Aasra, a village at the base. The boys moved there for their Class VIII studies because the school in the fort has classes only up to Class VII, and it would be a tough daily walk. Though Jangam is remarkably fit, and has been making this trek since he was a child, it takes him 50 minutes downslope. This makes him sad about the younger kids in Raireshwar.The Maharashtra government’s education department has decided to close down zilla parishad schools with less than 10 students; this will affect approximately 1,300 schools, including the tiny one in the fort. According to the department — and Education minister Vinod Tawde has stated this too — low student numbers means that quality of education is poor. The students will be accommodated in ‘nearby’ schools.RTE ground rulesThe Right to Education Act says that the distance between a primary school and the house of a student must be less than one km till Class V, and less than 3 km from Class VI to VIII. But the Raireshwar children will now have to go to Rairi school, 35 km away. “It will take them at least two hours,” says Jangam. “Why are they doing this? Have those officers come for inspection at least once before taking this decision? Can these poor kids leave their homes and relocate closer to the school?”Raireshwar fort — where in 1645, the then-16-year-old Shivaji took an oath to found a Maratha empire —houses a hamlet of around 150 residents, mainly farming families.“I park my bike at the base of the fort and climb up the iron stairs,” says Arvind Shinde, the only teacher at the Raireshwar school “The kids will have to walk five kilometres down the mountain, then another 35 km to their school. It will be impossible in the monsoon.” Mr. Shinde fears that his 10 students will be forced to stop their education because of the arduous walk.The Hindu encountered two other primary schools on the plateau, in similar isolated hamlets: Malwadi (Raireshwar) with one student and Keshavnagar (Dhanvali) with three students. As with the fort school, these too will soon close, and the students will have to walk to Rairi village.Keshavnagar sits on a cliff, three kilometres further across the plateau. Its ‘basti-school’ was set up in 2001 to serve the 20 to 25 Mahadev-Koli (a Scheduled Tribe) families there. It too has a single teacher, Tulshiram Wagmare, who parks his motorcycle at Kankwadi village at the base of the cliff and walks for an hour up the path, which passes through a forest. He once lived here, but he moved his family to Bhor; he comes here to teach because he feels a commitment to the community. “Their parents are not educated,” he says. “Forget Rairi, they will not even allow these kids to come down to the closest school, at Khalchi Dhanivali. Who would want a Class I girl to walk through the forest for one or two hours daily?” Mr. Wagmare’s students include Sonal and Pratiksha Dhanavale, who are in Class I and III. On the day this reporter visited, heavy rain, the after-effect of Cyclone Ockhi, had made Keshavnagar unapproachable. “In the monsoon, even I stay on top because it is impossible to climb down. How can you expect little kids to do this?”Arduous trekFormer students from these schools say that while they had to walk down from the plateau to secondary school, at least their primary school was close by, which won’t be the case for the young ones now. “It takes at least two hours through a dense forest,” says Sonali Kank, who now studies in a college at Bhor. “Even we never walk that path alone. How will their parents send them down? It will end their education.” Rahul Dhanvale, from Khalchi Dhanivali, mid-way between Kankwadi and Keshavnagar, now a Class XI student in a school in Bhor, says. “I am an expert on walking these roads. But mud, rocks and steep slopes drain your energy. Why should those kids suffer?”The teachers and parents with whom The Hindu spoke requested not to be named, out of fear of the government, but bitterly criticised the education department’s decision, calling it absurd, unjustified and disastrous for the children.“It does not matter whether the school has even one student,” a teacher said. “Education is not about making profit. The school should run if it is close to the student’s home.” He is sure that no girl will be sent even to primary school if the decision is implemented. “What you are seeing is just 0.001% of the total problem. This decision has created havoc in the state.” A parent wondered if the government had done any physical survey before deciding on closing down the schools. “Why do they want my son to drop his education? This is inhuman,” he said.last_img read more