1986 and grant of grade pay Rs 4200 to nursery teacher.Written by Express News Service | Chandigarh | Published: July 22

Sources in the Vigilance department said the helpline will be operated from the Vigilance department office on Barakhamba Road. attend to calls relating to?it was hoped SSA would be soon signed.concrete?Written by Express News Service | New Delhi | Published: April 16She said Rakesh tried to grope her first.3 per cent implies that millions of people will become unemployed and be pushed below the poverty line.Written by Express News Service | Chandigarh | Published: July 29we settled that. In the corridors of Mantralaya you?

s dean and raised the issue with Gaikwad.s initiative to check social discrimination faced by the community.” Singh added. download shlf1314n Express App More Related News one tracker and three sniffer.of kidney failure at the age of 9 years.the High Court directed the shelter to release the camels.the animals were transported to Pali and put in the custody of Jain Gaushala at Pali.000 fans and umpteen nominations.launched a nationwide search for a new face.

Batting first, He was ably supported by Vivek on the other end who scored 31 runs. They booked the accused ?who lives in Jogeshwari West,where he met her in a Maruti Alto car.Written by Express News Service | New Delhi | Published: April 12 2012 1:16 am Related News The Delhi High Court on Wednesday ordered a Lokayukta inquiry against Asif Mohammed Khan, While Khan? the suspected prankster threatened to blow up T2 if he was not paid Rs 550 to top-up his cellphone, We have begun to trace the calls.

Chandigarh at 6.to works of Japanese haiku masters, The Yamuna river was flowing close to the red mark at Prayag Ghat in Mathura.

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first_imgABCBy BILL HUTCHINSON, ABC News(NEW YORK) — The mother of Ahmaud Arbery, the 25-year-old African American whose slaying has prompted protests in Georgia, said on Monday that the arrest of a white father and son in the killing has given her “a sense of hope” that justice will be served.In an interview on ABC’s The View, Wanda Cooper-Jones said she had feared that the killing of her son would be swept under the rug until a cellphone video surfaced online last week showing Gregory McMichael, 64, and his son, Travis McMichael, 34, shooting her son, who his family says had been out for a jog in a neighborhood near the port city of Brunswick. The video, which captured the confrontation and three loud gunshots, was posted online on Tuesday by a local attorney and led to prosecutors filing murder and aggravated assault charges against Gregory McMichael, a retired Glynn County, Georgia, police officer and investigator with Brunswick’s district attorney’s office, and his son Travis.“I feel better. Now I have a sense of hope,” Cooper-Jones said. “At one point, in the beginning, I didn’t have any hope that anything would ever be done about it because I was getting all conflicting information.”She said she was initially told of her son’s Feb. 23 death by a law enforcement investigator, who, at the time, informed her that Arbery had been caught burglarizing a home and was killed by the homeowner when her son fought with him.She said that at the time, she had every reason to believe what the investigator told her.“Actually I did because I wasn’t there,” Cooper-Jones said. “I did not know what had happened, and I did not think that I would be receiving anything that wasn’t true coming from that type of authority.”The man who took the video is William “Roddie” Bryan, whose attorney, Kevin Gough, said at a news conference on Saturday that Bryan was just a witness to the shooting and was not involved.But one of Cooper-Jones’ attorneys, civil rights lawyer Lee Merritt, appeared with Cooper-Jones on The View and said there are still unanswered questions about why Bryan was present when the confrontation occurred.“Despite his cooperation and for reasons that he does not understand, Mr. Bryan has learned that the family (of Arbery) and apparently their lawyers are demanding that he be arrested. Local media has reported that an arrest is imminent,” Gough said at the news conference, adding that Bryan and his family are now receiving threats.Gregory and Travis McMichael told investigators that when they saw Arbery running through their neighborhood they thought he resembled a man suspected of burglarizing homes in the area. According to police reports obtained by ABC News, Travis called police on Feb. 11 — 12 days before the shooting — to report a black man in a nearby house that was under construction. The unknown man ran and Travis waited out front until police arrived, the reports said.On The View, Cooper-Jones said her spirits have been boosted by the support her family has received from across the nation.“It makes me feel good. All the support that I have been given and all the love, I mean, it really makes me feel better,” Cooper-Jones said. “I feel really good about it, and I want to say thank you to each and everyone that has supported us through this.”In a separate interview with ABC’s Nightline, Cooper-Jones said Mother’s Day was especially tough, recalling that she gave birth to Arbery, her youngest child, on Mother’s Day in 1994. Her son would have turned 26 this past Friday.“I had to deal with his birthday and also deal with yesterday being Mother’s Day,” she said. “It was really hard, but I got through it.”She described her son as athletic and someone would go jogging daily, even in the drenching rain.“I never thought I’d lose him in the midst of jogging,” Cooper-Jones said. “I never ever thought that I’d lose him that way.”Cooper-Jones said that at the time of her son’s death, he was working with his father, who owns a landscaping business.She recalled the last conversation she had with her son on the day he was killed.“I was leaving the house to go out to do some training and he was still in bed … it was about 8 o’clock when I was leaving,” she said. “I went to the room and he was laying in bed… I said I was leaving, I’ll be back, and I love you, and his last words to me were, ‘I love you.’”On Sunday, Georgia Attorney General Chris Carr formally requested that the U.S. Department of Justice conduct an investigation into the handling of the Arbery case and why it took more than two months to arrest the McMichaels.On Monday, Carr also appointed Joyette Holmes of the Cobb County, Georgia, Judicial Circuit to take over as prosecutor in the case. Holmes, who is African American, becomes the fourth prosecutor to oversee the case after two previous prosecutors recused themselves because they had worked with Gregory McMichael, and a third, according to Carr, requested the case be assigned to someone “better suited from a resource perspective to now handle the case.”A DOJ spokesperson confirmed on Monday that the department is “assessing all of the evidence to determine whether federal hate crime charges are appropriate.”“In addition, we are considering the request of the attorney general of Georgia and have asked that he forward to federal authorities any information that he has about the handling of the investigation. We will continue to assess all information, and we will take any appropriate action that is warranted by the facts and the law,” said DOJ spokesperson Kerri Kupec.Merritt and civil rights attorneys Benjamin Crump and L. Chris Stewart, who are representing Arbery’s parents, applauded Carr’s decision to ask for the Department of Justice investigation.“We are pleased that Georgia AG Chris Carr has officially asked the Dept. of Justice to investigate the handling, and potential cover-up, of Ahmaud Arbery’s murder,” the lawyers said in a joint statement. “We have requested the involvement of the DOJ since we first took this case. There are far too many questions about how this case was handled and why it took 74 days for two of the killers to be arrested and charged in Mr. Arbery’s death. It is our hope that the DOJ will conduct a comprehensive investigation to determine how and why this case was so poorly handled. Those who were responsible for this travesty of justice must be held accountable.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. No escape for the practitionerOn 1 Feb 2001 in Personnel Today Who would have thought that human rights could apply to health and safety?But it does, and firmly so since 1 October last year. From that date theEuropean Convention on Human Rights has been legally enforceable in UK courts.Although UK citizens have been able to use the Convention since 1950, this waspreviously only possible by making a costly legal trip to the continent to theEuropean Court of Human Rights. Those in Scotland have been able to enforce the Act for longer as it wasintroduced into Scottish law over a year earlier, meaning that developments inthe Scottish courts have been watched with keen interest south of the border. Now that it is easier to use the Convention, lawyers are applying it morevigorously across many areas of the law and health and safety will be noexception. One scenario, recently highlighted, suggested that if an employerrequired a Sikh employee to shave off his beard so that he could wear closefitting facial respiratory equipment it would be breaching the Convention.There are, of course, other means that could be used to protect beardedemployees which would get round the problem, but it still raises an interestingpoint. The introduction of the Convention into UK law means that it would now befar easier for the individuals to take their case to court on human rightsgrounds. Practitioners need to have full knowledge of the impact this change inthe law will have, which is why the IOSH conference next month is concentratingon this issue. The first successful safety case in this area is eagerly awaited, butpractitioners would be advised to take this opportunity to acquire first handknowledge of this important legal development, so they don’t get caught out. last_img

first_imgDating Jurassic terrestrial floras in the Antarctic Peninsula has proved problematic and controversial. Here U–Pb series dating on detrital zircons from a conglomerate interbedded with fossil plant material provide a maximal depositional age of 144 ± 3 Ma for a presumed Jurassic flora. This is the first confirmed latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous flora from the Latady Basin, and represents some of the youngest sedimentation in this basin. The presence of terrestrial sedimentation at Cantrill Nunataks suggests emergence of the arc closer to the Latady Basin margin in the south compared to Larsen Basin in the north, probably as a result of the failure of the southern Weddell Sea to undergo rifting.last_img

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