first_imgAug 11, 2009Flu picks up in Asia with monsoon seasonNovel H1N1 influenza is spreading in India, Thailand, and Vietnam with the onset of Asia’s monsoon season, the World Health Organization (WHO) said today, according to Reuters. The regular flu season has started in those countries, and both H1N1 and seasonal flu are being detected, said WHO spokeswoman Aphaluck Bhatiasevi. But the spread of pandemic H1N1 appears to have peaked in parts of the southern hemisphere, including Argentina, Chile, Australia, and New Zealand.http://in.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idINIndia-41686620090811Aug 11 Reuters article Disease expert notes fever-free flu casesIn his clinical observation of novel flu cases in the United States and South America, Richard P. Wenzel, MD, former president of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, has noted that some patients are afebrile, even some with serious infections, and lack of fever might underestimate case totals, the New York Times reported yesterday. He said diarrhea seen in a portion of patients suggests a need for stool testing to assess transmission and the role of better hand hygiene.http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/11/health/11docs.htmlAug 10 New York Times article School nurse shortage could slow ID of sick kidsSchool nurses are expected to be at the frontlines of detecting and fighting novel flu when schools resume this fall, but the ratio of nurses to students in many states falls well below the levels suggested by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), USA Today reported yesterday. The CDC recommends a workload of 1 nurse per 750 students, but the newspaper’s analysis of census data puts the national average at 1 per 971 students.http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2009-08-10-school-nurses_N.htmAug 10 USA Today story IOM holds meeting on protective equipment for novel fluThe Institutes of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Board on Health Sciences Policy is convening a meeting today through Aug 13 on pandemic influenza and personal protective equipment (PPE) for healthcare workers. Today’s agenda includes a call to the committee, with panel discussions starting tomorrow. Topics include the science and clinical experience with novel H1N1, infection control guidelines, risk assessment in health workers, and data on the effectiveness of PPE.http://nationalacademies.org/hmd/activities/workforce/respproth1n1/2009-…IOM meeting home pagelast_img

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first_img Solange Knowles is Harvard Foundation Artist of Year Radcliffe has panelists, comedians, and an author explore how we talk about language and gender Janet Mock, the acclaimed transgender activist, writer, producer, advocate, and director, has been named the 2019 Harvard University Artist of the Year.  She will receive the Harvard Foundation’s arts medal on March 9 during the annual Cultural Rhythms festival in Memorial Hall’s Sanders Theatre.Mock’s two memoirs, “Redefining Realness” (2014) and “Surpassing Certainty” (2017), were New York Times best-sellers. She is a sought-after speaker, an advocate for transgender rights, and the founder of #GirlsLikeUs, a social media project that empowers transgender women.Mock made television history last year as the first transgender woman of color to write, direct, and produce a television series, Ryan Murphy’s FX drama “POSE,” which assembled the largest-ever cast of transgender actors in regular roles for a scripted series. The show was hailed  by critics and renewed for a second season, which is currently in production. Mock has a number of other TV projects in the works. Mock was named one of Time magazine’s “100 Most Influential People of 2018,” calling her one of “12 new faces of black leadership” and one of “the most influential people on the internet.” In 2017, she was one of Variety’s “Power of Women” and Fast Company named her one of 2015’s “most creative people in business.” She was featured on Ebony magazine’s Power 100 list, and the PEN Center USA gave her an Award of Honor during its 27th annual Literary Awards Festival.The Ms. Foundation, Planned Parenthood, Feminist Press, GLSEN, Shorty Awards, and the Sylvia Rivera Law Project have all honored Mock for her work.Born in Hawaii, Mock earned a B.A. in fashion merchandisingfrom the University of Hawaii, Manoa, and an M.A. in journalism from New York University. She began her career as an editor at People.com and has written for The New Yorker, The New York Times, Marie Claire, Interview, and Allure. She has also worked as a correspondent for “Entertainment Tonight” and a host for MSNBC, where she helmed the groundbreaking series “So POPular!,” interviewing Lena Dunham, Salma Hayek, and Issa Rae.Mock also produced and conducted all interviews for the HBO documentary “The Trans List,” and hosted and produced the podcast “Never Before,” which featured in-depth interviews with people such as Rep. Maxine Waters, Tina Knowles, Kris Jenner, and Oscar winner Tarell Alvin McCraney.The award will be presented to Mock at the Cultural Rhythms Festival during a program on March 9. Tickets will be available to Harvard ID holders beginning Friday at noon (two-ticket limit per ID. Price $10), and to the general public beginning Saturday at noon, at the Harvard Box Office in the Smith Campus Center at 1350 Massachusetts Ave., by phone at 617-496-2222, or online at www.boxoffice.harvard.edu. (Handling fees may apply. Two-ticket limit. Price $20.)Media note: The Artist of the Year award will be presented to Mock during the Harvard Cultural Rhythms Festival. The official program begins at 4:30 p.m. on March 9. Press credentials will be issued between 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. on that day in the Sanders Theatre lobby. Please email [email protected]  for credential applications, which will be approved on March 8. Singer, songwriter, visual artist will receive award at March 3 ceremony center_img Related ‘Ways with Words’ conference will spark conversationlast_img

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