first_img For the third consecutive Test match France have fallen just short. Beaten 25-23 by Australia in November, 24-19 by the All Blacks a week later and now edged out 19-16 by England on Saturday. Hence the plaintive cry on the front page of Monday’s Midi Olympique lamented ‘When is the happiness?’ Coach Guy Noves will hope it arrives on Sunday afternoon, when France host Scotland at the Stade de France, but while he ponders his team selection, here are five things we learnt from France’s defeat to England…King Louis: Man of the Match Picamoles gets away an offload. Photo: Getty Images1. Peerless PicamolesSince making his Test debut in 2008, Louis Picamoles has struggled for consistency. His best rugby has tended to come on a summer tour or at a World Cup when he’s in a hothouse environment, advantageous for his physical and mental wellbeing. Moving to Northampton was a bold and brave move on the part of the 31-year-old, a cultural as well as a rugby challenge, and it’s one that has paid off. Fitter than he’s ever been, Picamoles made 131 metres against England with 16 carries, a tireless performance that so nearly inspired France to victory.Selection box: Is coach Guy Noves too reliant on Toulouse players? Photo: Getty Images2. Too much ToulouseGuy Noves coached Toulouse for 20 years but it’s time he cut the umbilical cord with the club he turned for a time into Europe’s finest. In recent seasons they’ve become a ‘comfort-zone club’, idols in the city but idle on the training park. The message may finally be getting through to Noves – Maxime Medard and Sebastien Bezy have been dropped this season – but the one-dimensional Yann David should never have been called up last month, and Jean-Marc Doussain should be nowhere near the French squad. Yoann Maestri and Cyril Baille’s places in the starting XV should also come under scrutiny this week.Break man: Winger Noa Nakaitaci stood out at Twickenham. Photo: Getty Images3. Red zone errors From the red zone to replacements, Gavin Mortimer looks at five key findings from France’s loss to England in round one of the Six Nations The one player who made a positive difference for France from the bench was Rabah Slimani, scoring a try and winning a penalty for his side at the scrum. The 27-year-old tighthead endured a torrid 2015-16, his form affected by personal problems off the field and accusations of illegal scrummaging on it. Clermont forwards coach Didier Bes was the first to go public with the accusations, in the wake of Stade Francais’ destruction of his pack in November 2015. The allegations concerned Slimani’s habit of binding under an opponent’s armpit and then swinging him down. Referees began to penalise Slimani and his loss in confidence coincided with Stade Francais’ collapse in form. Now his self-belief is back, he’s scrummaging well (and wisely), and his inclusion ahead of Uini Atonio would worry the Scots.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img France made 17 line breaks to New Zealand’s six in November’s Test, and against England they made 13 to their hosts’ eight. And yet for all that, les Bleus managed just two tries – both scored by forwards. What’s letting France down is their execution in the red zone. They’re creating opportunities but as Remi Lamerat demonstrated in the first half against England their dodgy decision-making is costing them dear. If the Clermont centre had slipped the ball inside to the unmarked Noa Nakaitaci, France would have scored on the stroke of half-time. But Lamerat went for glory himself and was bundled into touch by the English defence.Two tens: Jean Marc Doussain and Camille Lopez at France training. Photo: Getty Images4. A barren benchThe force was with the French as the match entered the final quarter. Rabah Slimani had scored the first try of the match and the visitors sensed victory was within their grasp. Then the benches came into play. While England introduced Jamie George, James Haskell, Danny Care, Jack Nowell and Ben Te’o, the French had nowhere near that strength to call upon. The decision to replace fly-half Camille Lopez with Doussain was bizarre and, as it turned out, costly. The truth is France are desperately thin in some areas, and one wonders how they would cope if Lopez, Picamoles or hooker Guilhem Guirado hobbled off early against Scotland.Prop star: Rabah Slimani breaks to score France’s only try against England. Photo: Getty Images5. Rabah’s roar Flying the flag: France fans enjoy their day out at Twickenham. Photo: Getty Images last_img

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first_imgAs the FTSE 100 surges over 5%, what do I think are the best UK shares to buy now? See all posts by Matthew Dumigan Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Enter Your Email Address I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Image source: Getty Images center_img Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Matthew Dumigan owns shares of boohoo group. The Motley Fool UK has recommended ASOS, boohoo group, GlaxoSmithKline, Just Eat Takeaway.com N.V., and Unilever. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Despite the FTSE 100‘s recent surge on the back of the Pfizer vaccine announcement, I think investors should still be concerned about the impact that widespread pandemic restrictions could have on UK shares. After all, we’re only near the start of the latest English lockdown. As such, it’s highly likely that we’ll continue to see companies struggle for the foreseeable future.With that in mind, I’m going to take a look at the types of stocks I think make for wise investments for the remainder of 2020 and beyond.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…UK companies that don’t fear Lockdown 2.0In my view, there’s no better place to start than with companies that look poised to continue performing strongly despite the lockdown restrictions. While such businesses are few and far between, they offer investors the prospect of superior returns, I feel. That’s even in the midst of an uncertain and shaky macroeconomic climate.For example, consider online food order and delivery service Just Eat Takeaway. After all, people still have to eat during a pandemic. Additionally, having the food delivered straight to your door is a huge bonus. What’s more, the company reported an increase in first-half earnings and revenue as it benefited from the first lockdown. Overall, Just Eat has performed outstandingly over recent months, and I reckon that trend looks set to continue.With many e-commerce stocks thriving throughout 2020, I think it also makes sense to consider their appeal. While more than 11,000 shops closed for good in the UK in the first half of the year, online retailers such as ASOS and Boohoo reported a surge in profits. Both companies have watched their sales boom and look well-positioned to navigate the second round of restrictions with ease. In my eyes, that’s largely thanks to their popular and affordable products.I’d play it safe with defensive sharesWhile there’s certainly a possibility that some companies will continue to thrive throughout the rest of the year, I think investors like me looking to play it safe would do well to focus on hoovering up a handful of UK shares with defensive characteristics. Since some companies’ dividends and valuations are less affected by the overall state of the economy, their shares tend to be more resilient and less volatile.For instance, companies in the healthcare sector often possess attractive defensive qualities. Considering the products and services provided, healthcare stocks are also often less cyclical in nature. Companies such as GlaxoSmithKline and AstraZeneca immediately spring to my mind. Both manufacture various essential pharmaceuticals, medicines and healthcare products, which are in demand no matter the economic circumstances.Finally, I rank well-established consumer goods giants among the best defensive stocks to invest in during a pandemic. Think of the many much-loved brands of Unilever that line the shelves of supermarkets. Similarly, Reckitt Benckiser’s health, hygiene and home products are perpetually in demand among consumers. Matthew Dumigan | Tuesday, 10th November, 2020 last_img

first_img Royston Wild | Friday, 12th March, 2021 | More on: TSCO I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Tesco’s (LSE: TSCO) share price has been on a wild ride in recent weeks.The robustness of the British grocery sector in 2020 allowed the FTSE 100 firm to avoid some of the stock price washouts that countless other UK shares endured. It basically finished the year at the same level as it began it. But Tesco’s share price has fallen sharply after deciding to pay a special dividend and embark on a share consolidation last month.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Tesco’s now trading at its cheapest since June 2017, around 220p per share. Is now the time to buy?Bright spotsThere are a number of reasons why I think Tesco’s share price could rocket higher. These include:#1: The growth of online shopping. Covid-19 lockdowns over the past 12 months have seen a legion of new customers do their grocery shopping on the internet. And as a consequence, predicted online growth rates for food retail have been given a boost. This bodes particularly well for Tesco, which is the leading operator for online delivery with a market share of around 35%. The FTSE 100 firm has ramped up capacity to make the most of this opportunity too.#2: Doubling down on Britain. Tesco’s crown at the top of British retail first began to slip when it embarked on hasty foreign expansion at the start of the millennium. Doomed forays into territories like the US and Japan were costly in their own right and sucked up a lot of time and money that could have been best dedicated to the company’s core UK market. The retailer seems to have learned its lessons though, and the sale of its remaining Asian assets in December means that Tesco has moved even further in the right direction.Threats to Tesco’s share priceDespite these bright spots, however, there are reasons why the FTSE 100 company might struggle to rise again.Rampant competition is one. My main concern is that the British grocery sector is becoming more and more competitive. The aggressive expansion of Aldi and Lidl has pulled shoppers out of Tesco’s clutches in huge numbers over the past decade. The threat is intensifying online too, with the German discounters taking tentative steps in the realm of internet shopping. US e-tail giant Amazon is gradually ramping up the attack as well.Huge Covid-19 costs are another issue. Tesco also faces the prospect of more heavy charges related to Covid. The firm announced in January that it was hiking its full-year cost estimates to £810m, up a whopping £85m from its previous estimates. A prolonged battle to curb the coronavirus could see the FTSE 100 firm continuing to rack up eye-popping costs.The verdictIt could be argued that Tesco’s cheap share price reflects these problems. The retailer currently trades on a sub-1 forward price-to-earnings growth (PEG) ratio of 0.3 times, suggesting it’s undervalued. But I won’t be buying the grocery giant as those rising competitive pressures create too much risk for me. I’d rather buy other UK shares today.  Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Image source: Getty Images I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee.center_img Enter Your Email Address FTSE 100: this is what I’d do about the cheap Tesco share price! Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Royston Wild has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of and has recommended Amazon. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Tesco and recommends the following options: long January 2022 $1920 calls on Amazon and short January 2022 $1940 calls on Amazon. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. See all posts by Royston Wild Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shareslast_img

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Evangelism, Food and Faith Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Environment & Climate Change, Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Releasecenter_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Farm ministry distributes seedlings in lower Michigan amid churchwide call to plant, pray, proclaim Rector Martinsville, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Katie Forsyth, left, and the Rev. Nurya Parish prepare seedlings for delivery May 27 at Plainsong Farm in Rockford, Michigan. Photo: Plainsong Farm[Episcopal News Service] The Holy Spirit works in mysterious ways and in all kinds of vehicles – even Katie Forsyth’s rented Dodge Grand Caravan. With its back seats folded down for expanded cargo space, the minivan was enlisted this week for a two-day, thousand-mile delivery run as Forsyth ferried seedlings and garden kits across the dioceses of Eastern and Western Michigan.About 20 congregations, including three ecumenical partners, have committed to planting vegetables as part of Good News Gardens, a new initiative of Plainsong Farm in Rockford, Michigan. The farming ministry, about 15 miles northeast of Grand Rapids, also received a grant from Heart of West Michigan United Way to offer Good News Gardens’ seedlings and kits to up to 25 individuals in Kent County.Seedlings from Plainsong Farm were taken this week by minivan to participants in Good News Gardens around Lower Michigan. Photo: Plainsong FarmThe farm and the two Episcopal dioceses organized the gardening initiative this spring on short notice, partly in response to economic disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic, which has resulted in 40 million unemployment claims nationwide and exacerbated existing inequalities.“My sense is that we are headed to economically uncertain times, and it would be wise for us to be mindful to ensure as much equitable access to healthy food as we can,” the Rev. Nurya Parish, an Episcopal priest and executive director of the farm, told Episcopal News Service.Parish also is advising churchwide officials as they grow a broader gardening movement that follows The Episcopal Church’s call to creation care and evangelism. This week, the church launched a Good News Gardens website that encourages all Episcopalians to take up gardening as a spiritual discipline and a form of discipleship.“It’s not just about the dirt,” the Rev. Melanie Mullen told ENS. “It’s about this relational, prayerful act.” Mullen serves as the church’s director of reconciliation, justice and creation care. “There’s a connection between caring for Earth and the way you care for people.”Mullen’s office teamed up with Jerusalem Greer, the church’s staff officer for evangelism, to develop the churchwide Good News Gardens movement. It invites participants to commit to planting, praying and proclaiming, including on a new Agrarian Ministries group on Facebook. Those who sign up on the website also receive newsletters intended to help deepen their engagement with the spirituality of gardening.“People are looking for ways to help,” Greer said in an interview with ENS. “They are looking for ways to bring hope about in their own life and to share.”Even a window box with flowers is a way of sharing, by adding beauty to the neighborhood, Greer said. Gardeners also can use the herbs they grow in their baking and then share what they’ve baked with neighbors. And they can donate fresh produce to local food pantries and food banks, where demand has surged since the United States was hit in March with escalating outbreaks of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.Food inequity was a problem before the pandemic, Mullen said, but “this COVID crisis has just unmasked and unearthed how intense and severe it is.”The increased severity was clear to church leaders in the dioceses of Eastern and Western Michigan, which have been led together by Bishop Whayne Hougland Jr. since 2019. Hougland began discussing food access and security issues with Forsyth, who serves the dioceses as canon for evangelism and networking. Forsyth was aware of several congregations already involved in gardening ministries, and others had land that could be put to similar use.“Using our properties, knowing that we have these assets that are just sitting there that could be used to further the kingdom of God … it clicked,” Forsyth said by phone May 27 when ENS caught up with her as she was finishing her seedling delivery rounds.Putting church properties to fuller use has been an ongoing focus of Parish’s ministry at Plainsong Farm. She founded the farm with farmers Mike and Bethany Edwardson, and while Plainsong’s outdoor worship services in the summer are ecumenical, it has received financial support from The Episcopal Church, including through its church planting grants.This year, with a Roanridge Trust grant, the farm launched a pilot program called ChurchLands aimed at helping congregations become better stewards of their properties. Fifteen congregations in 12 states signed up for the yearlong program, which kicked off with a two-day in-person session at Plainsong Farm in January. Participants are keeping in touch throughout the year as they receive guidance in land conservation, sustainable agriculture and Gospel-inspired development of church properties.Parish also previously served on The Episcopal Church’s Advisory Council for the Stewardship of Creation. As a deputy to the 79th General Convention in 2018, she proposed a resolution that was adopted calling for an inventory of church-owned properties to identify opportunities for expanding creation care ministries.“When we as a church don’t even know what land we have, we don’t know if we can make a difference,” she told ENS.Mapping church-owned properties is a gradual, ongoing process, whereas Good News Gardens came together quickly this spring as congregations signed up to participate. Plainsong Farm grew the seedlings and has been coordinating distribution, with help from the farm’s summer program manager, Emily Ulmer, a seminarian at Western Theological Seminary in Holland, Michigan.Each allotment of 16 seedlings and additional seed packets are intended to fill about 75 square feet of garden space. Participating congregations and individuals also receive fertilizer, Good News Gardens yard signs and spiritual formation materials. The Edwardsons, Plainsong’s resident farmers, are offering gardening tips online. Participants have the option of joining a season-long discipleship program led by Parish, who also serves as a part-time parish priest at Holy Spirit Episcopal Church in Belmont, just north of Grand Rapids.Plainsong Farm is in Kent County, which includes Grand Rapids, Michigan’s second-largest city at about 200,000 people. Farm volunteers are distributing seedlings this week to participants within the county. As they do, they are wearing masks and taking other precautions to reduce transmission of the coronavirus.Some congregations and individuals have elected to pick up their seedlings at the farm. Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, in the southern Grand Rapids suburb of Wyoming, was already in planting mode by May 27, when it posted a video to Facebook showing parishioners tending to the congregation’s raised garden beds.For the participants outside of Kent County, they waited for Forsyth and her rented minivan.On May 26, she pulled in at Plainsong Farm, and she and Parish loaded up the back with seedlings. Forsyth’s first day mainly covered deliveries to churches in Western Michigan. Representatives from each participating congregation met Forsyth at prearranged drop-off locations that were convenient for her travels. She, too, wore a mask and never handed the seedlings directly to recipients, so that distancing guidelines could be followed.On May 27, she filled up at the farm again and drove around Eastern Michigan before finally turning west for her final drop-off location, in the parking lot of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Paw Paw, west of Kalamazoo.Peppers, cucumbers, zucchini, summer squash, kale, lettuce, basil, tomatoes, onions.“I can tell you, this van smells pretty good,” Forsyth said.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest By David PaulsenPosted May 28, 2020 Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH COVID-19, Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN last_img

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