first_img Enter Your Email Address “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Investors in DS Smith (LSE:SMDS) would be reaping their rewards if they bought the stock six months ago. The share price has been boosted more than 50% during that time as it has weathered the Covid 19 storm better than most from the FTSE 100.Just this week, the share price was boosted by the news that the firm was the subject of interest from fellow FTSE 100 blue-chip Mondi.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…The shares rose more as much as 14% on Thursday as news of the potential merger was reported. With the news of the potential merger, would I add the shares to my portfolio or Stocks and Shares ISA today? Mondi madnessLet’s have a look at what details have emerged about the Mondi deal. According to data from Bloomberg, it would be one of the biggest UK M&A deals this year at around £5bn. It must be noted that the deal is still in its early stages according to the report, so is far from being signed off.I think the deal would make a lot of sense for both parties however. Both Mondi and DS Smith offer similar paper and packaging services. Demand for these has increased due to the pandemic, and such a merger would allow for quick growth and scalability.DS Smith has benefited from the pandemic as both its core business of supplying supermarket packaging has boomed. In addition to this, ecommerce has clearly been one of the big winners from Covid 19, and our increasing amount of deliveries need to be packaged. Profits returned to growth in DS Smith’s most recent earnings report, after suffering an initial drop in its first quarter following the onset of the coronavirus.Risk potentialIt hasn’t been all plain sailing for DS Smith throughout the pandemic, however. The shares still carry a certain amount of risk. The cost of paper for recycling has almost doubled from 2020, with the price rising more so in Europe than anywhere else. Europe happens to be one of DS Smith’s largest markets.Analysts at Bank of America reckon it could take up to a year for DS Smith to increase prices to protect margins, potentially stifling profits during that time.There is also the potential of increased competition in the industry. As a fellow Fool noted, if Amazon or another large ecommerce retailer were to enter the packaging market, it could harm the DS Smith share price performance in the long run.As for whether I would invest in DS Smith shares today, I think I would hold off for the time being. Much will depend on if and how the Mondi merger deal goes through, and there isn’t anything official from either company regarding the acquisition. I may well revisit DS Smith shares if anything official is announced by either company, however. See all posts by Conor Coyle I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. The DS Smith share price is rising! Here’s what I’d do now Image source: Getty Images. John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. conorcoyle has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended DS Smith. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Conor Coyle | Saturday, 27th February, 2021 | More on: SMDS I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. 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first_imgKenya Commercial Bank (KCB.rw) listed on the Rwanda Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2004 annual report.For more information about Kenya Commercial Bank (KCB.rw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Kenya Commercial Bank (KCB.rw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Kenya Commercial Bank (KCB.rw)  2004 annual report.Company ProfileKenya Commercial Bank (KCB) Rwanda Limited is a commercial bank offering financial solutions to private individuals and the corporate banking segment in Rwanda. KCB Bank Rwanda is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the KCB Group which is East Africa’s largest commercial bank by asset base. The Bank was established in 2008 after it was licensed by Rwanda’s banking regulator, the National Bank of Rwanda. It has 14 branches located in the main towns and cities of Rwanda as well as an extensive network of KCB Iwacu agents. Kenya Commercial Bank is listed on the Rwanda Stock Exchangelast_img

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first_imgChiwetel Ejiofor, Lupita Nyong’o and Steve McQueenAfricans were enslaved by Britain and the United States in continental North America for nearly 250 years (1619-1865). The profits accrued from the Atlantic slave trade led to the rise of industrial capitalism and the worldwide exploitative system of imperialism. (See “Capitalism and Slavery” by Eric Williams, 1944)A new film directed by Steve McQueen, a Caribbean-British filmmaker of Grenadian descent, captures the horrors of U.S. slavery in his depiction of an autobiography, “12 Years a Slave,” written by Solomon Northup in 1853. Northup was legally a free African living in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., who was lured to Washington, D.C., and then kidnapped into slavery in Louisiana.Northup’s life in New York was portrayed as a successful one with a loving spouse and two children.A skilled carpenter and violinist, he was invited by two white men in 1841 to come to Washington to negotiate the terms of a performance tour. He was then drugged, chained to the floor of a ship and transported to Louisiana, where he became a slave.It would take 12 years for Northup to escape the slave masters. He was subjected to enslavement by three plantation owners, the final one of whom tormented and tortured him along with other Africans.The plight of Solomon Northup portrayed in this film was by no means an isolated incident. There were many Africans who were considered “free” who later wound up on plantations.Africans are portrayed in the film not only as victims of the racist and exploitative system but also as resisters who defied their captors through slowing down work production, running away and fighting against brutality by the overseers and owners.Brilliant actingNorthup was played by Chiwetel Ejiofor, an acclaimed actor who was born in London to Nigerian parents in 1977. He began acting during his school years at the age of 11.Ejiofor has received numerous acting awards and nominations, including the 2006 British Academy of Film and Television Arts Rising Star, three Golden Globe Awards nominations and the 2008 Laurence Olivier Award for Best Actor for his performance in Othello. He appeared in such films as “Dirty Pretty Things,” “The Operative in Serenity,” “Kinky Boots” and “Children of Men.”One of the most compelling performances in the film was the depiction of “Patsey,” an African slave woman who was subjected to horrendous abuse by the plantation owner Edwin Epps, played by actor Michael Fassbender. The owner attempts to rationalize his abusive behavior through a false interpretation of the Bible that supposedly justifies the torture and rape of the enslaved.Patsey was brilliantly portrayed by Kenyan actress Lupita Nyong’o. This film represented her debut in films in the U.S.Nyong’o is the daughter of Kenyan politician Peter Anyang Nyong’o, who had previously served as the minister of Medical Services and was elected to the national parliament in the recent 2013 elections to represent Kisumu County in the country’s Senate. Lupita’s cousin, Isis Nyong’o, was named by Forbes magazine in 2012 as one of the most powerful women in Africa.Lupita Nyong’o graduated from Hampshire College after studying film production and theater. She has worked on various films and would later attend Yale Drama School, from which she graduated in 2012.  Lupita Nyong’o is considered by many film critics as the frontrunner in the best supporting actress category for the 2014 Academy Awards.Reparations — a demand for justice  The narratives and autobiographies of enslaved Africans have made a tremendous contribution to the exposure of the exigencies of the slave system. These accounts are taken directly from those impacted by the exploitative and oppressive system.Slavery was not only a moral issue but its existence was indispensable to the development of the U.S. ruling class as the dominant force in world imperialism.The impact of slavery is still very much in evidence in the U.S. today. The U.S. government has consistently refused to recognize the contributions of slavery to the political and intellectual culture of the country.Moreover, the U.S. government and capitalist corporations have refused to pay reparations to the descendants of enslaved Africans. Even current President Barack Obama, whose father was born in Kenya, stated during his initial presidential race in 2008 that he opposed the payment of reparations to African descendants in the U.S.This film makes a monumental contribution to the popularization of consciousness about the political, social and economic origins of the U.S. capitalist system.  It makes a powerful statement as to why African Americans are continuing to demand reparations for slavery and remain in the forefront of the struggle against racism and national oppression.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img

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