No escape for the practitioner

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. No escape for the practitionerOn 1 Feb 2001 in Personnel Today Who would have thought that human rights could apply to health and safety?But it does, and firmly so since 1 October last year. From that date theEuropean Convention on Human Rights has been legally enforceable in UK courts.Although UK citizens have been able to use the Convention since 1950, this waspreviously only possible by making a costly legal trip to the continent to theEuropean Court of Human Rights. Those in Scotland have been able to enforce the Act for longer as it wasintroduced into Scottish law over a year earlier, meaning that developments inthe Scottish courts have been watched with keen interest south of the border. Now that it is easier to use the Convention, lawyers are applying it morevigorously across many areas of the law and health and safety will be noexception. One scenario, recently highlighted, suggested that if an employerrequired a Sikh employee to shave off his beard so that he could wear closefitting facial respiratory equipment it would be breaching the Convention.There are, of course, other means that could be used to protect beardedemployees which would get round the problem, but it still raises an interestingpoint. The introduction of the Convention into UK law means that it would now befar easier for the individuals to take their case to court on human rightsgrounds. Practitioners need to have full knowledge of the impact this change inthe law will have, which is why the IOSH conference next month is concentratingon this issue. The first successful safety case in this area is eagerly awaited, butpractitioners would be advised to take this opportunity to acquire first handknowledge of this important legal development, so they don’t get caught out. last_img read more

HR holds the power in modernisation plans

first_img Comments are closed. HR holds the power in modernisation plansOn 6 Nov 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. HR will need to play a central role if the modernisation of public servicesis to be a success. This was the message from Sir Richard Wilson, Cabinet Secretary and head ofthe Home Civil Service, during a seminar on modernisation and change in publicservices. “It is important for HR managers to realise they are the most powerfulpeople in terms of the success of their organisation. You have the keyresponsibility for bringing about change,” he said. The Civil Service is two years into a five-year process of reform. Wilsonstressed that developing effective leadership had been an essential part of managingchange. “We need teams of people at the top who have the skills to run a moderndepartment,” he said. Wilson said the Civil Service is committed to recruiting and promoting staffon merit to ensure the best people are in the right jobs. Performance management including annual bonuses linked to departmentaltargets have also played an important part in changing the service’s culture. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Delivering on your promises

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Buildinga brand is not enough, says Shaun Smith, you need to build teams thatunderstand the brand, understand the customer and can act as ambassadors forthe product Fancyflying a MIG 21 at twice the speed of sound? No problem, pick up a voucher onyour local high street. How about undertaking a James Bond mission and, in theprocess, getting the weapons training and gadgets? Buy a gift certificate.Theseadventures and more were available to consumers to purchase for themselves orothers at Christmas. This is not just a retailing phenomenon. Consumers arelooking for experiences that enable them to realise their dreams and achievetheir desired lifestyle. From hotels to retailing to airlines, consumers arelooking for suppliers who go beyond mere service to offer experiences that meettheir unique needs. They are looking for a ‘branded customer experience’ – aservice that is intentional, consistent, different and valuable. Disneystarted the trend. First Direct started a new concept in banking using it.Howard Schultz of Starbucks applied it to selling coffee, and Richer Sounds issaid to have the highest sales per square foot of any retailer in the world bydoing it. All these companies are retaining customers by delivering serviceexperiences that create value beyond the products or services the companies areselling. And through it they are enhancing loyalty, generating higher marginsand gaining market share.Butwhat’s the difference between simple good customer service and a brandedcustomer experience? How do you get your people to buy into it and what actionsmake a difference? Abrand is a promise and you have to deliver your promises. Take a look at mostadvertisements or promotions and the claims they make or imply. How often dothe companies making them actually deliver? Experiencing the brand is aboutcreating promises that have direct appeal to your target customers and theninvesting in education and training, effective teamwork, performance managementand communication. It is about creating systems that provide the skills andinformation everyone needs to deliver on them – consistently. All too often,the firm stops at defining high-level brand values – such as responsiveness,trustworthiness, and friendliness – without ever defining how these values willbe brought alive through the customer experience and without articulating howemployees need to behave to keep customers interested.Tomake a difference, it is crucial to unleash the power of the organisation – itspeople. All employees need to ‘get it’. They need to understand their role asbrand ambassadors and need a leader who can convince them it’s the rightdirection. Some years ago, Allen Chichester, then CEO of Leo Burnett’s HongKong operation set his strategy for the future in the midst of disappointingbusiness results.  Themessage to staff was: “Here’s what we’ll face if we don’t do this –dissatisfied clients, eroding market share, and declining earnings. But here iswhat it could be like if we work together – delighted clients, expandingbusiness, and record profits.” Shortly after that Leo Burnett increasedclient retention by 25 per cent and new account profitability by 63 per cent,reducing employee turnover by more than 40 per cent. Inthese companies, top management energises its people and never relinquishesresponsibility as the ultimate guardian of the brand. This is about people whowork in an environment where, through determined leadership and good training,everyone knows the customer is important. Customer-focused values matter andleaders set the direction and create the climate by giving their employees theessential tools to do the job.Becomingmarket leader and staying there are two different issues. Sustaining a leadingposition can only be done by constantly paying attention to your targetcustomers and what they value – ensuring that your organisation continues todeliver that value and brand promise every day. Thegreatest brands of the future will be those that, through a ‘branded customerexperience’, create meaning for customers and employees and create valuethrough differentiation. Thislevel of differentiation cannot be achieved through advertising alone, orthrough products that can be easily copied, nor through prices or ‘loyaltycards’ that stimulate short-term affection. Only ‘branded customer experiences’can create an indelible impression on customers that is so powerful and sopositive that they become the strongest type of advocates for the brand. Comments are closed. Delivering on your promisesOn 1 Feb 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

I want to move to employee relations

first_imgI want to move to employee relationsOn 7 May 2002 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. I have worked as an HR generalist for six years. I find I am increasinglyinterested in employee relations. What are the prospects for careers withinthis area? Is there a demand for this specialism and where do you think such acareer path could lead? And would there be any disadvantages to such a careermove? Caroline Battson, head of interim, Macmillan Davies Hodes Employee relations is one of the most popular areas of a generalist role inHR. In addition to solid generalist knowledge, the attributes needed fordealing with employee relations issues successfully within an organisation aregood communication skills, and the ability to influence and consult. It is a specialism within a generalist’s remit in the same way ascompensation and benefits, and training. If employee relations is the area youfind most interesting, you should have little trouble finding a role that hasan employee relations focus. You may want to concentrate on companies with large HR departments, as theywill often have dedicated employee relations’ positions within the HR team. Youwill find that an in-depth knowledge of this area will ensure you are in a goodposition to secure employment as it is the base for all HR roles. Cliff Dixon, consultant, Chiumento This field is specialist, and you will need to be sure you have sufficientinterest and aptitude to handle the necessary detail. Traditionally, this work has been found in large corporations and sectorssuch as manufacturing and engineering, but is now also being outsourced. Thisis creating a demand for writers of clear formatted guides and deliverers whocan enable managers to get to the core of an issue as fast as possible. You should thoroughly research the market for jobs, networking with bothspecialists and relevant generalists. CIPD magazines will give you anindication and HR recruitment agencies can help with unadvertised contacts. Test your own suitability and temperament for this type of work with allyour contacts. You will also need to carefully assess your long-term careerplan. Moving from generalist to specialist not only means less variety ofcontent, but can be a disadvantage in the future should you wish to revert. Inany event, you will need to stay in touch with the entire HR sector to maintainyour credibility. Peter Sell, joint managing director, DMSConsultancy You say you are interested in employee relations but it depends on how youdefine employee relations. A number of academics have put forward the view thatit is more than just procedures, staff negotiation and consultation. It isabout creating a climate that enhances the contribution of the employee. Anemployee relations professional should therefore be looking at performancemanagement programmes, training and development to improve business performanceand employee involvement. If this is the view you subscribe to then this couldbe a good career move where you can be seen to make an impact. If you take a narrower view, namely that employee relations is aboutemployment legislation, conflict and policy, then there are roles in theprivate and public sector. This will give you a specific expertise, but willnot necessarily restrict your future career options. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

BA launches e-learning project to improve training

first_imgBritish Airways is to launch an ambitious e-learning project to centraliseand improve the quality of training for its worldwide workforce. The company’s 50,000 staff, ranging from baggage handlers to pilots, will beable to use the intranet to access over 500 courses, including coaching,project management and leadership skills as well a new course on how torecognise and handle dangerous goods. Traditional classroom-based learning willalso be used alongside e-learning to deliver training to BA employees. The company has incorporated e-learning in its 30 open learning centres toensure that the 70 per cent of staff who do not have regular access to acomputer are able to benefit from the initiative. Elaine Wilson, British Airways e-learning manager, believes that moreaccessible training will help to improve career development within the companyand the quality of customer service. “As a leading airline, training anddevelopment is a critical part of our business strategy to ensure that ourstaff can provide the highest level of customer service. “However, with a global workforce who work irregular hours, are oftenon the move and differ greatly in culture and ways of working, providingconsistent and successful training is a continuous challenge. “E-learning presents the perfect solution offering our staff afantastic range of courses to chose from, including IT, business andprofessional development skills, and more importantly access whenever theychoose.” Related posts:No related photos. BA launches e-learning project to improve trainingOn 14 May 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. last_img read more

Knotel CEO says flex-office provider has new funding: report

first_imgShare via Shortlink Photo illustration of Knotel CEO Amol Sarva (Sarva by Sasha Maslov; iStock)As Knotel battles lawsuits from landlords, evictions and accusations of unpaid rent, its CEO says the flex-office provider has secured new funding.Knotel CEO Amol Sarva reportedly told staff on Monday that the company has gotten a fresh influx of cash, according to Business Insider, citing a source with knowledge of the all-hands meeting.Sarva did not disclose the amount of money raised or details about who was involved, although a source told the publication that it is a restructuring type of deal that includes equity and debt.Earlier this summer, Sarva said he had raised $10 million and wanted to raise $100 million by the end of August. Forbes reported that the new funding could cut the company’s valuation in half.In August 2019 the company said it raised $400 million through a Series C raise, which gave Knotel a valuation of at least $1.3 billion. Investors included Mori Trust, Itochu Corp, and Mercuria Investment Co, along with Newmark Knight Frank, Norwest Venture Partners, and the Sapir Organization, which is led by Alex Sapir.This year, Knotel has suffered along with other co-working companies as demand for office space has lagged during the pandemic. The company has been hit with a dozens of lawsuits over the past few months from landlords who claim they have not been paid, as well as eviction notices at two of its spaces.Knotel has also been scaling back its once-ambitious expansion plans and in November said it was looking to trim 60 percent of its 4.8 million-square-foot global portfolio. It has also cut staff several times over the course of the pandemic.[Business Insider] — Keith Larsen Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinkcenter_img TagsCommercial Real EstateKnoteloffice marketReal Estate Lawsuitslast_img read more

Victoria’s Secret may close 50 stores this year

first_img“Over the next six months, we will continue to work toward the separation of the two businesses, proceeding down a dual track to prepare for either a spin-off or a sale,” L Brands said in a statement to CNN.Although Bath & Body Works is closing as many as 40 of its stores within malls, it will also open about 50 locations in North America this year, many of which will be standalone or off-mall locations.Mall retailers have struggled in recent years — even before the pandemic — as mall foot traffic has diminished. Gap and Macy’s have both announced plans to fully or partially exit malls.[CNN] — Sasha JonesContact Sasha Jones Share via Shortlink Email Address* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink (Getty, iStock)Victoria’s Secret’s plans for its future are, well, not so secret.The lingerie retailer will close 30 to 50 stores in the United States and Canada this year, CNN reported. The move comes after the brand closed 241 stores in 2020.The closures will leave Victoria’s Secret with 848 stores across the two countries, down from more than 1,100 just a year ago.Its parent company, L Brands, previously made a deal with private equity firm Sycamore Partners to sell a majority stake in Victoria’s Secret and take the company private, but those plans fell through. The company, which also owns Bath & Body Works, is still exploring a sale of the lingerie brand.Read moreGap Inc. will close 350 stores and exit malls entirelyMacy’s to open smaller stores, bigger fulfillment centersPE firm to take Victoria’s Secret private as Leslie Wexner steps down Full Name* Message*last_img read more

WATCH: How the eviction ban is affecting landlords, renters

first_img Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Tags New York’s eviction moratorium has saved some from ruin, but threatens to cause it for others.The moratorium, which has stretched on for 13 months, isn’t the only of its kind: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced its own national eviction moratorium last September which, like New York’s, has been repeatedly extended. And the state moratorium’s most recent expiration date was May 1, but this week lawmakers voted to extend it to Aug. 31.The moratoriums have been a point of contention. Some tenant advocates say that while the ban on evictions is needed, rental aid doesn’t go far enough. Meanwhile, some landlords have been vocal in their opposition to the state and federal moratoriums. Some say their tenants have taken advantage of the system, while smaller landlords say nonpayment from tenants has made it difficult to meet mortgage payments.In a recent video series, The Real Deal looked at what the moratorium has meant for both sides.While property owners dispute it and even question its constitutionality, tenant advocates and researchers said that CDC’s moratorium is necessary during a pandemic. From the risk of coronavirus spread among unhoused people to the impossibility of navigating the housing court system during a lockdown, lawyers, epidemiologists and advocates found that the moratoriums were not only helpful but life-saving.The CDC’s moratorium is set to expire June 30. While states with their own eviction moratoriums in place may have differing deadlines, landlords and tenants alike are wondering what’s next. CoronavirusEvictionslandlordsPoliticsVideo Share via Shortlinklast_img read more

A 800 year record of nitrate from the Lomonosovfonna ice core, Svalbard

first_imgDetailed chemical analysis of the 122 m, relatively high-altitude and lowmelt Lomonosovfonna ice core provides the best-dated record of nitrate from Svalbard. A very significant non-linear trend present in the record shows: (a) a rise in concentrations from the 12th to the mid-16th century, (b) reasonably stable concentrations until the mid19th century, (c) a rise in concentrations into the 20th century, with (d) a rapid rise in the 1950s and (e) a decrease after the mid-1980s. Nitrate is well correlated with ammonium before 1920 and after 1960 but not in the intervening period. The correlation between ammonium and nitrate concentrations indicates that ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) has been common at Lomonosovfonna. There are also places in the core where nitrate is very closely associated with calcium.last_img read more

Latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous age for a fossil flora from the Latady Basin, Antarctic Peninsula

first_imgDating Jurassic terrestrial floras in the Antarctic Peninsula has proved problematic and controversial. Here U–Pb series dating on detrital zircons from a conglomerate interbedded with fossil plant material provide a maximal depositional age of 144 ± 3 Ma for a presumed Jurassic flora. This is the first confirmed latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous flora from the Latady Basin, and represents some of the youngest sedimentation in this basin. The presence of terrestrial sedimentation at Cantrill Nunataks suggests emergence of the arc closer to the Latady Basin margin in the south compared to Larsen Basin in the north, probably as a result of the failure of the southern Weddell Sea to undergo rifting.last_img read more