Johnson and Marler to make England debut against the Boks

first_img TAGS: Exeter ChiefsHarlequins “We have made no secret of how tough this series will be but it is an opportunity we are looking forward to and I am confident that we can perform.”England v South AfricaSaturday, 9 June 2012 at Kings Park, DurbanKick:off – 16:00 BST The Exeter Chiefs flanker will make his debut on SaturdayTOM JOHNSON and Joe Marler will make their England debuts in the 1st Test of the Castle series in Durban on Saturday.The Exeter Chiefs flanker and Harlequins prop will win their first caps at Mr Price Kings Park in a team showing four personnel and one positional change from the starting line-up against Ireland in the final RBS 6 Nations outing.Marler replaces Alex Corbisiero, Johnson comes in for Tom Croft, while there are also changes at scrum half, where Ben Youngs starts in place of Lee Dickson and in the back three, where Ben Foden moves to the left wing for David Strettle and Mike Brown starts at full back.England Head Coach Stuart Lancaster said: “Tom and Joe have had great seasons at their clubs and have worked really hard to get this chance, both are in great form and have really  impressed in training. Equally, Mike Brown has been outstanding for Harlequins. By moving Ben to the wing we retain his strike power and aerial skills and can utilise not only Mike’s attacking and defensive assets we can also call on his left-footed kicking game.“Selection is competitive in lots of positions, particularly at scrum half. We are really pleased with Ben’s form and he knows our systems well. Lee, if he gets his chance from the bench I am sure will make an impact and Danny will get his opportunity to press his case, as will the others, in the first midweek game on Wednesday. It’s also great to see another young player get Test match experience in Jonathan Joseph and he is delighted to get this opportunity in the match 22 – we are confident he is ready for the step up to this level. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA – JUNE 02: Tom Johnson looks on during the England training session held at Northwood Crusaders Rugby Club on June 2, 2012 in Durban,South Africa. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Starting XV:Mike Brown (Harlequins), Chris Ashton (Northampton Saints), Manu Tuilagi (Leicester Tigers), Brad Barritt (Saracens), Ben Foden (Northampton Saints), Owen Farrell (Saracens), Ben Youngs (Leicester Tigers), Joe Marler (Harlequins), Dylan Hartley (Northampton Saints), Dan Cole (Leicester Tigers), Mouritz Botha (Saracens), Geoff Parling (Leicester Tigers), Tom Johnson (Exeter Chiefs), Chris Robshaw (capt, Harlequins), Ben Morgan (Scarlets),Replacements:Lee Mears (Bath Rugby), Paul Doran Jones (Northampton Saints), Tom Palmer (Stade Francais), Phil Dowson (Northampton Saints), Lee Dickson (Northampton Saints), Toby Flood (Leicester Tigers), Jonathan Joseph (London Irish)last_img read more

The toll of rugby on Johnny Sexton

first_imgRacing-Metro’s Irish fly-half Jonathan Sexton is about to kick the ball and to score during the Top 14 rugby union match Paris Stade Français vs Racing Metro, on October 26, 2013 at the Stade de France stadium in Saint Denis, near Paris. AFP PHOTO LIONEL BONAVENTURE (Photo credit should read LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images) Up until the autumn international break Sexton had played 666 minutes of Top 14 rugby, not to mention 180 minutes of Heineken Cup action against Clermont and the Scarlets. But let’s just concentrate on the Top 14 today and those devilish 666 minutes of league action.For Leinster last season, Sexton played a total of 668 minutes of Rabo12 rugby. That’s right, just two minutes more than he’s already totted up for Racing in the Top 14. Considering that Sexton is not even halfway through the Top 14 season and that, should Racing reach the final, potentially he has another 18 matches to play, then the ‘wear and tear’ Schmidt moans about is going to get far worse.Sexton has played in nine of Racing’s eleven league fixtures, one game fewer than he played for Leinster last season in the Rabo12. In the 2011-12 season the Ireland fly-half featured eight times for his province (seven starts and one as a substitute) and in the 2010-2011 campaign he appeared in ten matches. Waiting for some news: Johnny Sexton will have to wait and see what the extent of his hamstring injury isBy Gavin MortimerJONATHAN SEXTON is looking unlikely to play against the All Blacks at the weekend. The Ireland fly-half limped out of Saturday’s dispiriting 32-15 loss to Australia with a hamstring injury and the extent of his condition will be known once medics have consulted his scans.Speaking on Sunday, Ireland coach Joe Schmidt said in all probability the 28-year-old Sexton will have to undergo a fitness test later this week before any decision is made on the All Blacks game. “My expectation would be that he would have to train on Friday,” said Schmidt, adding: “He hasn’t really spent that much time with us training, he had a little hip-flexor issue plus we left him to rest against Samoa just because of the attritional game time he had already accumulated…I think the wear and tear of that game time has consequences, and unfortunately those consequences have fallen in our lap.”Palpable fury?: Josef Schmidt takes Ireland’s trainingSchmidt’s frustration – perhaps anger would be a more accurate description – is palpable, and it’s clear who he holds responsible for Sexton’s plight. Racing Metro.Sexton signed for the French club last season, leaving behind Leinster for an alleged monthly salary of €52,000 (according to the French press, only Toulon star Jonny Wilkinson’s monthly wage of €56,000 trumps Sexton in the Top 14). Big bucks, but in return the Parisian club wanted their pound of flesh. And boy have they got it. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS No longer lovingly managed: Sexton has played a lot of rugbyThe days of Sexton being lovingly managed through the season by Leinster and the IRFU are long gone. As has been well documented, the Top 14 clubs have little sympathy with the international game, and who can blame them given the pay packets they dole out. Sexton – along with Dan Lydiate, Jamie Roberts and a host of other world stars – was hired by Racing owner Jacky Lorenzetti over the summer to transform the club’s fortunes after several disappointing seasons .So far they haven’t been able to turn things around, and Racing lie ninth in the table behind the likes of the far less wealthy Grenoble and Brive. So Sexton’s fitness won’t just be causing concern in Ireland this week; there’ll be more than the odd Parisian hoping it’s nothing too serious. After all, Racing have a busy Christmas schedule coming up with three games in 14 days. Johnny is needed, dodgy hamstring and all.last_img read more

Top 14: Why Jake White’s approach was his downfall at Montpellier

first_img The saddest thing about Jake White’s departure is that no one much cares in Montpellier. As this column reported in May, the former Springbok coach has never courted the affection of the locals. Big mistake. White isn’t the first Anglophone coach to fail in France, and he won’t be the last, but that a man of his experience should have so utterly misread the French psyche suggests stubbornness or vanity got the better of him.It went wrong from just about the first moment White arrived at the club in January 2015 and made an ill-judged joke about Montauban. Then he fired a lot of French players, hired a lot of South African players and got them playing a style of rugby that bored Montpellerians to tears.I know Montpellier well. I lived there for five years. Played rugby, bought a house, raised a child. I was one of them. In as much as a Brit ever could be. They’re a hot-blooded lot in the Languedoc.Unlike other cities on the Mediterranean coast – Narbonne, Beziers, Perpignan and Toulon – Montpellier isn’t steeped in rugby history. It’s more of a football city by nature, and rugby only really began to take hold a decade ago when the club moved to a new stadium and fielded four talented local lads in Louis Picamoles, Julien Thomas, Fulgence Ouedraogo and Francois Trinh-Duc.Hands off! Montpellier flanker Fulgence Ouedraogo takes on Pau. Photo: Getty ImagesThe appointment of Fabien Galthié as coach in 2010 only made the club sexier in the eyes of the fans. A native of Cahors, a couple of hundred miles north of Montpellier, Galthié had the same volatile temperament as them.Attendances rose. In the first four matches of the 2013-14 season the average gate was 13,276 and president Mohed Altrad began to dream of building a club to rival Mourad Boudjellal’s Toulon. But then he and Galthié fell out. Word has it that the former France captain is a brilliant technician but a hopeless people person. As he started to lose the dressing room Galthié swanned off to Brazil for a birthday party when he should have been preparing his team to play Oyonnax.Altrad showed Galthié the door and brought in as his successor a man as gruff as Galthié was garrulous. White doesn’t use two words where one will do, but however many he used none were French. According to the French press, White’s failure to learn the language to any significant degree was a contributory factor in Altrad’s decision not to extend his contact.Moving on: Scotland coach Vern Cotter is expected to take over at Montpellier in June. Photo: Getty ImagesWhite wanted to stay on, says L’Equipe, but his president wants him out when his contract expires in June. Tuesday’s paper states that Altrad has been searching for a successor since the summer, allegedly offering Bernard Laporte a monthly salary of €100,000 if he took the job. The former Toulon coach turned it down; his focus remains on the FFR presidency. In the end Altrad has hired Vern Cotter on a three-year deal, with the Kiwi taking up his position next June. South African Jake White is set to be replaced as Montpellier coach by Vern Cotter next summer – here’s a look at where he went wrong These are a passionate people. Proud and emotional. And sentimental, though it’s unlikely much of that will be wasted on White when he leaves.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Watchful eye: Montpellier head coach Jake White oversees training. Photo: Getty Images center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS White was doomed, claims L’Equipe, from the day last November when he allegedly sounded out the RFU about the vacant England job. Montpellier were in London to play Harlequins in the European Challenge Cup and apparently the South African let it be known he was interested. Altrad wasn’t impressed.But is there more to it than that? After all, White is an ambitious international coach, and it’s only natural that he’d express a mild interest in one of the top coaching jobs in world rugby.Euro winners: Montpellier celebrate beating Harlequins to lift the Challenge Cup last season. Photo: Getty ImagesMight not the fact that crowd numbers are on the wane have also alarmed Altrad? The average gate this season is 10,431, nearly 3,000 fewer than three years ago. Yet this is a club that last season won the Challenge Cup and reached the semi-finals of the Top 14. Fans should be flocking to cheer on their boys. But the locals don’t want to cheer for a team of South Africans, the ‘Langueboks’, as they’ve been dubbed. Of the 39 players listed on the Montpellier website, 18 are French.Only Ouedraogo remains of that youthful quartet from a decade ago. In the summer Trinh-Duc departed to Toulon after 13 years of loyal service. There was no fond farewell for Trinh-Duc from his adoring public. White wouldn’t allow him that honour. Instead, in a spiteful gesture he dropped Trinh-Duc from the squad for the final home match of the season. Asked why by a baffled French press, a scornful White explained that professional rugby was no place for sentiment.In a sense he’s right but sentiment matters to the French. Anachronistic, maybe, in 21st century sport, but that’s the way the French are. Trouble is, White never bothered to learn much about the French. He was too busy getting his team to play a style of rugby that was clinical and cold-blooded. Everything the city of Montpellier is not.last_img read more

Wales 8-32 Australia: Five talking points

first_imgThe skipper: Sam Warburton was a miss for his breakdown workWithout Sam Warburton and Taulupe Faletau Wales were unable to secure little meaningful possession or, worse still, slow the Wallaby’s ball. Gethin Jenkins was effective as ever at the breakdown but you can’t expect a prop who will regularly be the last player to leave a scrum, lineout and maul to be the first or second player to get to the breakdown and especially not for 80 minutes. Wales need Faletau and more specifically Warburton back immediately.No offload gameThe majority of the Southern Hemisphere teams, especially the All Blacks, Argentina and the Wallabies, are playing a modern offload game based on skills – Wales are not. The Wallaby backline made twelve offloads, Wales half that. During the first half Israel Folau appeared to be playing a different sport such was his ability to step and offload. It’s a major problem for Wales. Currently the Welsh squad is set up for big direct carries, high balls between the 10 metre lines and goal kicking from any ensuing penalties.Space to offload: Israel Folau was one of many Wallaby backs able to offloadAs was apparent on Saturday, and has been for over 2 years, tries are now winning games, not goal kicks. Despite losing at the weekend to a tremendous performance from Ireland (in which they scored five tries), the All Blacks have slaughtered all before them with Beauden Barrett placing the kicking tee (and despite being a magnificent player, goal kicking is not exactly Barrett’s strength). To beat the top four sides in the world, Wales need to start scoring three to four tries a game. This simply isn’t happening. A dark day: Wales endured a punishing 80 minutes against the Wallabies In a desperately disappointing first Autumn outing, Wales were outthought, outfought and outplayed by the Wallabies. Expect the post-mortem to be long and arduous The slowest of slow startsWales have become notoriously sluggish starters in the autumn internationals. However, Wales’ 32 – 8 loss to Australia was beyond sluggish. This was like watching a hungover sloth using a slow cooker. Wales were mastered by an Australian team which largely struggled during The Rugby Championship yet dominated Wales in every department. It took Wales until the 17th minute to register their first forward carry which is truly remarkable in a game in which the core principle is to carry the ball forward. Barring some solid work from Gethin Jenkins, the Wallaby back row owned the breakdown for 80 minutes.Out of the blocks: Reece Hodge scores early on as Wales failed to get startedOn second viewing, some of the Australian ruck ball was so fast that it looked as though my TV was replaying the game on +3. The speed of the Wallaby ball regularly caught Wales’ defensive line out of place and allowed their backline to pour through the Welsh defence. Some of the line breaks were so clean that many Welsh defenders didn’t even have the chance to attempt a tackle. During the first half Wales had just 20% of the territory and 30% of the ball which led to as unbalanced a first half of test rugby as you will ever see. It was a sorry day for all of the Welsh team with the exception of Ross Moriarty, he can hold his head up high – the others may be looking down for the majority of this week.Dummy runners perplexed WalesThe word ‘dummy’ in rugby refers to the player who is made to look as though he is the intended recipient of a pass. On Saturday ‘Dummy’ was a more accurate reflection of the Welsh defenders as they turned 180 degrees to see another Wallaby pour through the middle. Admittedly, the last minute change of Scott Williams for Jon Davies will have affected the Welsh defence, but not to a huge degree – Williams is a very good test centre and a very solid defender.Finding the gaps: The Wallaby strike runners perplexed the Welsh defenceThe speed of the Wallaby’s ruck ball meant that a simple dummy, or screen, left even warrior-like defenders like Jamie Roberts baffled. Every Wallaby line break and try left the Welsh backline looking at each other with blank expressions as though they had been zapped by that memory loss gun from ‘Men in Black’. Except on this occasion it was men in gold who caused the blank expressions.Wales missed Sam WarburtonI have a new smart phone which actually allows me to change the TV channel on any TV in my house. It’s amazing. But it’s not its primary function and it isn’t the reason that it was selected. And it’s the same for open-side flankers. Many forget that for outside backs or other back row forwards to make flashy 30 yards breaks in the wider channels somebody has had to take 30 shoulders to the face in order to win that ball in the first place. TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Moriarty is here to stayWhen the dark stares and even darker words are delivered in the Welsh camp this week, they will not be aimed at Ross Moriarty. He was, by some distance, Wales’ best performer. This will come as no surprise to any Gloucester supporters who will have seen the eight/ blindside deliver test performances for his club this season.All action: Ross Moriarty was one of the few standouts for WalesHe was the pack’s leading ball carrier, with metres gained not merely number of carries, joint top in the entire squad for defenders beaten and the top tackler with 18. It was a determined performance amongst what was largely dreck. In a squad of test veterans it was the relative newcomer who didn’t panic in the face of overwhelming possession and territorial numbers. The status quo of the Welsh back row can no longer remain – even when all are fit, Moriarty must start.last_img read more

Six Nations: Five things we learnt about France v England

first_img For the third consecutive Test match France have fallen just short. Beaten 25-23 by Australia in November, 24-19 by the All Blacks a week later and now edged out 19-16 by England on Saturday. Hence the plaintive cry on the front page of Monday’s Midi Olympique lamented ‘When is the happiness?’ Coach Guy Noves will hope it arrives on Sunday afternoon, when France host Scotland at the Stade de France, but while he ponders his team selection, here are five things we learnt from France’s defeat to England…King Louis: Man of the Match Picamoles gets away an offload. Photo: Getty Images1. Peerless PicamolesSince making his Test debut in 2008, Louis Picamoles has struggled for consistency. His best rugby has tended to come on a summer tour or at a World Cup when he’s in a hothouse environment, advantageous for his physical and mental wellbeing. Moving to Northampton was a bold and brave move on the part of the 31-year-old, a cultural as well as a rugby challenge, and it’s one that has paid off. Fitter than he’s ever been, Picamoles made 131 metres against England with 16 carries, a tireless performance that so nearly inspired France to victory.Selection box: Is coach Guy Noves too reliant on Toulouse players? Photo: Getty Images2. Too much ToulouseGuy Noves coached Toulouse for 20 years but it’s time he cut the umbilical cord with the club he turned for a time into Europe’s finest. In recent seasons they’ve become a ‘comfort-zone club’, idols in the city but idle on the training park. The message may finally be getting through to Noves – Maxime Medard and Sebastien Bezy have been dropped this season – but the one-dimensional Yann David should never have been called up last month, and Jean-Marc Doussain should be nowhere near the French squad. Yoann Maestri and Cyril Baille’s places in the starting XV should also come under scrutiny this week.Break man: Winger Noa Nakaitaci stood out at Twickenham. Photo: Getty Images3. Red zone errors From the red zone to replacements, Gavin Mortimer looks at five key findings from France’s loss to England in round one of the Six Nations The one player who made a positive difference for France from the bench was Rabah Slimani, scoring a try and winning a penalty for his side at the scrum. The 27-year-old tighthead endured a torrid 2015-16, his form affected by personal problems off the field and accusations of illegal scrummaging on it. Clermont forwards coach Didier Bes was the first to go public with the accusations, in the wake of Stade Francais’ destruction of his pack in November 2015. The allegations concerned Slimani’s habit of binding under an opponent’s armpit and then swinging him down. Referees began to penalise Slimani and his loss in confidence coincided with Stade Francais’ collapse in form. Now his self-belief is back, he’s scrummaging well (and wisely), and his inclusion ahead of Uini Atonio would worry the Scots.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img France made 17 line breaks to New Zealand’s six in November’s Test, and against England they made 13 to their hosts’ eight. And yet for all that, les Bleus managed just two tries – both scored by forwards. What’s letting France down is their execution in the red zone. They’re creating opportunities but as Remi Lamerat demonstrated in the first half against England their dodgy decision-making is costing them dear. If the Clermont centre had slipped the ball inside to the unmarked Noa Nakaitaci, France would have scored on the stroke of half-time. But Lamerat went for glory himself and was bundled into touch by the English defence.Two tens: Jean Marc Doussain and Camille Lopez at France training. Photo: Getty Images4. A barren benchThe force was with the French as the match entered the final quarter. Rabah Slimani had scored the first try of the match and the visitors sensed victory was within their grasp. Then the benches came into play. While England introduced Jamie George, James Haskell, Danny Care, Jack Nowell and Ben Te’o, the French had nowhere near that strength to call upon. The decision to replace fly-half Camille Lopez with Doussain was bizarre and, as it turned out, costly. The truth is France are desperately thin in some areas, and one wonders how they would cope if Lopez, Picamoles or hooker Guilhem Guirado hobbled off early against Scotland.Prop star: Rabah Slimani breaks to score France’s only try against England. Photo: Getty Images5. Rabah’s roar Flying the flag: France fans enjoy their day out at Twickenham. Photo: Getty Images last_img read more

2019 Rugby World Cup: Japan 30-10 Russia

first_imgAll you need to know about the opening match of the 2019 Rugby World Cup Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features.Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Japan will need to improve ahead of their next match against Ireland. When the slick handling comes off they look dangerous, particularly given their speed, but there were too many errors in this game and they lacked composure under high balls and restarts – something Ireland will surely have noted.Related: Rugby World Cup TV CoverageStar manFor Russia, Tagir Gadzhiev was a real menace in attack and defence, while Vladimir Ostroushko showed decent touches in midfield. The Japan back row – Michael Leitch, Pieter Labuschagne and Kazuki Himeno – got through a lot of work but in a performance littered with errors, it has to be Kotaro Matsushima. The winger was clinical when given opportunities, used his pace to good effect and became the first Japan player to score a hat-trick at a Rugby World Cup. Job done!Full house: Most of the crowd in Tokyo were bedecked in Japan’s red and white (Getty Images)The reactionJapan wing Kotaro Matsushima: “It is my first three tries as a Japanese player. We were able to connect with each other and the roar of the fans became our driving force.”Russia captain Vasily Artemyev: “Everyone could see we were playing at the same intensity as Japan. We were pushing them to the edges and we were getting some dividends. Maybe we could have scored a couple more penalties if we went for it but we chose to apply the pressure through our set-piece, but unfortunately, we didn’t get the result we wanted.”The TeamsJapan: William Tupou (Ryohei Yamanaka 70); Kotaro Matsushima, Timothy Lafaele, Ryoto Nakamura, Lomano Lava Lemeki; Yu Tamura (Rikiya Matsuda 67), Yutaka Nagare (Fumiaki Tanaka 61); Keita Inagaki (Isileli Nakajima 55), Shota Horie (Atsushi Sakate 75), Asaeli Ai Valu (Jiwon Koo 55), Wimpie van der Walt (Luke Thompson 61), James Moore, Michael Leitch (captain, Hendrik Tui 70), Pieter Labuschagne, Kazuki Himeno.Tries: Matsushima 12, 39, 69, Labuschagne 47. Cons: Tamura, Matsuda. Pens: Tamura 2.Russia: Vasily Artemyev (captain); German Davydov, Vladimir Ostroushko, Dmitry Gerasimov (Vladislav Sozonov 67), Kirill Golosnitskiy; Yuri Kushnarev (Ramil Gaisin 66), Vasily Dorofeev (Dmitry Perov 33-40); Valery Morozov (Andrei Polivalov 66), Stanislav Selskii (Evgeny Matveev 66), Kirill Gotovtsev (Azamat Bitiev 67), Andrey Ostrikov, Bogdan Fedotko (Andrey Garbuzov 61), Vitaly Zhivatov (Anton Sychev 66), Tagir Gadzhiev, Nikita Vavilin.Try: Golosnitskiy 5. Con: Kushnarev. Pen: Kushnarev. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Japan Stage set: The Japan and Russia teams line up in Tokyo before kick-off (Getty Images) 2019 Rugby World Cup: Japan 30-10 RussiaHead-to-headPlayed – 7Japan wins – 6Russia wins – 1Did You Know?Kirill Golosnitskiy’s fifth-minute try is the fastest ever in an opening Rugby World Cup match. It’s also only the second time – after 1987 – that a try has delivered the first points rather than a penalty goal.Quick off the mark: Kirill Golosnitskiy scores the opening try of RWC 2019 (Getty Images)Related: Rugby World Cup FixturesIn a nutshellIt was hardly a cracker to kick off Japan 2019 – long stoppages, numerous errors, little flow – but the hosts will be pleased to have got the win, 30-10, and the try bonus point.Related: World Cup bonus points explainedThe nerves were evident in the first few minutes for Japan, so much so that they gifted Russia a try. William Tupou failed to take a high ball in the 22 and it bounced into the grateful arms of Kirill Golosnitskiy, who ran over for a simple early score.The tournament hosts led 12-7 by half-time; Kotaro Matsushima was the beneficiary of impressive offloading from his centres to cross twice (well, three times actually but one was rightly ruled out by the TMO for a knock-on).Dive time: Japan wing Kotaro Matsushima goes over for a try against Russia (Getty Images)Back-row Pieter Labuschagne gave his side some breathing room early in the second half as he ripped the ball in the tackle and broke clear for a try.Russia captain Vasily Artemyev then played a part in Japan’s bonus-point try in the 69th minute. Collecting a kick near his touchline in the 22, he kicked it infield where Japan had numbers and were able to spread the ball wide, with Matsushima on hand to get his hat-trick.You can watch Japan’s first try here…last_img read more

Russia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide

first_img A lot was expected of Ireland, but they… Having to rely on a play-off win against… Japan Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Ireland Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Russia Rugby World Cup GroupRussia are in Group A alongside Ireland, Scotland, Japan and Samoa.Related: 2019 Rugby World Cup GroupsRussia Rugby World Cup FixturesFri 20 Sep Japan 30-10 Russia (Tokyo). Match reportTue 24 Sep Russia 9-34 Samoa (Kumagaya). Match reportThu 3 Oct Ireland 35-0 Russia (Kobe) Match ReportWed 9 Oct Scotland 61-0 Russia (Shizuoka) Match Report Scotland failed to reach the quarter-finals for only… Samoa Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Hosting their first World Cup, Japan made history… Japan Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Scotland Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Expandcenter_img Ireland Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Collapse Expand Russia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, GuideRussia making it into Pool A of the 2019 Rugby World Cup was a shock. Their spot originally went to Romania but the Oaks dropped out after a farrago that saw them, Belgium and Spain docked Rugby Europe Championship points for fielding ineligible players.They may have lost all their pool matches but they troubled opponents more than expected and showed decent resilience.How They QualifiedRussia were the highest ranked team from the Rugby Europe Championship (excluding Georgia who qualified automatically).Key PlayersTalking about his Enisei side in 2016, Yuri Kushnarev told RW: “Everyone should be scared, we are Russian soldiers with big rockets!” The fly-half and former Northampton wing Vasily Artemyev are important figures. Openside Tagir Gadzhiev is one to watch.Utility: Artemyev played 33 times for Northampton (Getty Images)The Coach – Lyn JonesJones took up the reins in early August 2018. The former Dragons, Ospreys and London Welsh coach didn’t have much time to make any major changes…Sleeping bear: Lyn Jones has said he wants to awake the full potential of Russia (Getty Images)Major Work-onsDiscipline, fitness and mentality under pressure are the three areas Jones has focused on improving. Plus, they have little experience of playing top-tier nations.Russia Rugby World Cup Warm-upsSaturday 17 August 2019: Italy 85-15 RussiaTuesday 27 August: Russia 22-35 Jersey RedsSaturday 7 September: Russia 14-42 ConnachtRelated: 2019 Rugby World Cup Warm-ups Samoa Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Russia’s qualification for the tournament was a shock and it was only their second World Cup Expand Scotland Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Outclassed: Ireland last played Russia in the World Cup in 2011. Final score was 62-12. (Getty Images)Russia Rugby World Cup SquadRussia have just announced their Rugby World Cup squad below’Forwards (18):Sergey ChernyshevEvgeny MatveevStanislav Sel’skiyAzamat BitievKirill GotovtsevValery MorozovVladimir PodrezovAndrey PolivalovEvgeny ElginBogdan FedotkoAndrey GarbuzovAndrei OstrikovTagir GadzhievVictor GresevRoman KhodinAnton SychevNikita VavilinVitaly Zhivatov.Backs (13):Vasily DorofeevDmitry PerovRamil GaisinYuri KushnarevSergey YanyushkinGerman DavydovDmitry GerasimovKirill GolosnitskyVladimir OstroushkoIgor GalinovskiyDenis SimplikevichVladislav SozonovVasily ArtemyevRelated: 2019 Rugby World Cup FixturesPrevious World Cup Results and RecordRussia’s Rugby World Cup Record: P8 W0 D0 L82011 Pool stages2019 Pool stagesFollow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Who is Elliot Daly: Ten things you should know about the England back

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Who is Elliot Daly: Ten things you should know about the England backThe utility back with a siege-gun in his shoes, Elliot Daly has been an ever-present in the England team since first breaking into the team in 2016.Now playing for Saracens after a long stint at Wasps, he has been selected for the British & Irish Lions 2021 tour having also been part of the 2017 squad.Ten things you should know about Elliot Daly1. Elliot Daly was born on 8 October 1992 in Croydon. He attended Whitgift School, a local sporting powerhouse.2. He is nicknamed ‘Briefcase’ because he arrived at his first Wasps training session in his school uniform and carrying the offending item. Featuring briefcases and an enormous boot, here are some things about the Saracens star you might not know 7. Now known mostly as a full-back who can also play outside-centre, Daly played all three Test matches in New Zealand for the Lions on the left wing.8. Daly became only the second-ever England player to be sent off at Twickenham when shown a straight red card for tackling Argentina No 8 Leonardo Senatore in the air.9. He kicked a massive 63m penalty for England in Johannesburg back in 2018.10. The England squad are reliant on coffee – and Daly is the chief barista alongside Jamie George. The two are close friends, with Daly best man at George’s wedding.center_img Elliot Daly clears in England training during the 2020 Autumn Nations Cup (Getty Images) 6. His international debut came against Ireland in the 2016 Six Nations when he came on at inside-centre for now-clubmate Owen Farrell. England won 21-10 in an eventual Grand Slam campaign. 3. His long-range kicking skills were honed at school. He used to borrow his coach’s keys to get balls for practice – and sometimes hide them!4. Wasps first selected Daly when he was still a schoolboy, picking him to face Exeter in the Anglo-Welsh Cup in 2010. He was the club’s then-second youngest representative.Elliot Daly scoring for England U18 against France in 2010 (Getty Images)5. Daly played cricket for Surrey and England U15 as a fast-bowling all-rounder. He eventually stopped to focus on rugby.last_img read more

NZ: Christchurch Cathedral dean quits post for city council seat

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET [Ecumenical News International, Wellington, New Zealand] After nine years, the Rev. Peter Beck, dean of the Anglican Christchurch Cathedral, is quitting “the best job the church” to run for a seat on the Christchurch City Council.He wants to play a greater role in rebuilding New Zealand’s second biggest city following the devastating 6.3 magnitude earthquake on Feb. 22.“The best way I can represent many communities, including the church, is to campaign for a seat around the council table,” Beck said. “A new dean will lead the next phase in the project to build a new and wonderful cathedral, which must honor our heritage and build for the future.”Beck reportedly clashed with Christchurch Bishop Victoria Matthews over fundraising tactics to rebuild the deconsecrated Cathedral. He had hoped the cathedral would be rebuilt by the first anniversary of the earthquake, while Matthews believed money should be raised for all Anglican churches damaged in the quake, rather than just the cathedral.Haydn Rawstron of the cathedral’s Canons Almoner group says the Bishop is flying in the face of public opinion on the question of Christchurch Cathedral’s future and “seems now to have made untenable the position of the brilliantly competent cathedral dean, Peter Beck,” he wrote in a letter to The Press newspaper.Matthews, who is in South Korea on church-related business, did not respond to the criticism, but in a letter to her diocese she thanked Beck for his “outstanding ministry at the cathedral and in the wider community.”The Christchurch City Council will decide Dec. 16 whether to give money or public land to a proposal to build a temporary, cardboard cathedral. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Anglican Communion Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY By David CramptonPosted Dec 12, 2011 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID center_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK NZ: Christchurch Cathedral dean quits post for city council seat Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

Archbishop of Canterbury’s address to the Synod of Bishops in…

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Archbishop of Canterbury, Tags Ecumenical & Interreligious Featured Events Your Holiness, Reverend Fathers,brothers and sisters in Christ – dear FriendsI am deeply honoured by the Holy Father’s invitation to speak in this gathering:  as the Psalmist says, ‘Ecce quam bonum et quam jucundum habitare fratres in unum’.  The gathering of bishops in Synod for the good of all Christ’s people is one of those disciplines that sustain the health of Christ’s Church.  And today especially we cannot forget that great gathering of ‘fratres in unum’ that was the Second Vatican Council, which did so much for the health of the Church and helped the Church to recover so much of the energy needed to proclaim the Good News of Jesus Christ effectively in our age.  For so many of my own generation, even beyond the boundaries of the Roman Catholic Church, that Council was a sign of great promise, a sign that the Church was strong enough to ask itself some demanding questions about whether its culture and structures were adequate to the task of sharing the Gospel with the complex, often rebellious, always restless mind of the modern world.The Council was, in so many ways, a rediscovery of evangelistic concern and passion, focused not only on the renewal of the Church’s own life but on its credibility in the world.  Texts such as Lumen gentium and Gaudium et spes laid out a fresh and joyful vision of how the unchanging reality of Christ living in his Body on earth through the gift of the Holy Spirit might speak in new words to the society of our age and even to those of other faiths.  It is not surprising that we are still, fifty years later, struggling with many of the same questions and with the implications of the Council; and I take it that this Synod’s concern with the new evangelization is part of that continuing exploration of the Council’s legacy.But one of the most important aspects of the theology of the second Vaticanum was a renewal of Christian anthropology.  In place of an often strained and artificial neo-scholastic account of how grace and nature were related in the constitution of human beings, the Council built on the greatest insights of a theology that had returned to earlier and richer sources – the theology of spiritual geniuses like Henri de Lubac, who reminded us of what it meant for early and mediaeval Christianity to speak of humanity as made in God’s image and of grace as perfecting and transfiguring that image so long overlaid by our habitual ‘inhumanity’.  In such a light, to proclaim the Gospel is to proclaim that it is at last possible to be properly human:  the Catholic and Christian faith is a ‘true humanism’, to borrow a phrase from another genius of the last century, Jacques Maritain.Yet de Lubac is clear what this does not mean.  We do not replace the evangelistic task by a campaign of ‘humanization’.  ‘Humanize before Christianizing?’ he asks – ‘If the enterprise succeeds, Christianity will come too late: its place will be taken.  And who thinks that Christianity has no humanizing value?’  So de Lubac writes in his wonderful collection of aphorisms, Paradoxes of Faith.  It is the faith itself that shapes the work of humanizing and the humanizing enterprise will be empty without the definition of humanity given in the Second Adam.  Evangelization, old or new, must be rooted in a profound confidence that we have a distinctive human destiny to show and share with the world.  There are many ways of spelling this out, but in these brief remarks I want to concentrate on one aspect in particular.To be fully human is to be recreated in the image of Christ’s humanity;  and that humanity is the perfect human ‘translation’ of the relationship of the eternal Son to the eternal Father, a relationship of loving and adoring self-giving, a pouring out of life towards the Other.  Thus the humanity we are growing into in the Spirit, the humanity that we seek to share with the world as the fruit of Christ’s redeeming work, is a contemplative humanity.  St Edith Stein observed that we begin to understand theology when we see God as the ‘First Theologian’, the first to speak out the reality of divine life, because ‘all speaking about God presupposes God’s own speaking’; in an analogous way we could say that we begin to understand contemplation when we see God as the first contemplative, the eternal paradigm of that selfless attention to the Other that brings not death but life to the self.  All contemplating of God presupposes God’s own absorbed and joyful knowing of himself and gazing upon himself in the trinitarian life.To be contemplative as Christ is contemplative is to be open to all the fullness that the Father wishes to pour into our hearts.  With our minds made still and ready to receive, with our self-generated fantasies about God and ourselves reduced to silence, we are at last at the point where we may begin to grow.  And the face we need to show to our world is the face of a humanity in endless growth towards love, a humanity so delighted and engaged by the glory of what we look towards that we are prepared to embark on a journey without end to find our way more deeply into it, into the heart of the trinitarian life.  St Paul speaks (in II Cor 3.18) of how ‘with our unveiled faces reflecting the glory of the Lord’, we are transfigured with a greater and greater radiance.  That is the face we seek to show to our fellow-human beings.And we seek this not because we are in search of some private ‘religious experience’ that will make us feel secure or holy.  We seek it because in this self-forgetting gazing towards the light of God in Christ we learn how to look at one another and at the whole of God’s creation.  In the early Church, there was a clear understanding that we needed to advance from the self-understanding or self-contemplation that taught us to discipline our greedy instincts and cravings to the ‘natural contemplation’ that perceived and venerated the wisdom of God in the order of the world and allowed us to see created reality for what it truly was in the sight of God – rather than what it was in terms of how we might use it or dominate it.  And from there grace would lead us forward into true ‘theology’, the silent gazing upon God that is the goal of all our discipleship.In this perspective, contemplation is very far from being just one kind of thing that Christians do: it is the key to prayer, liturgy, art and ethics, the key to the essence of a renewed humanity that is capable of seeing the world and other subjects in the world with freedom – freedom from self-oriented, acquisitive habits and the distorted understanding that comes from them.  To put it boldly, contemplation is the only ultimate answer to the unreal and insane world that our financial systems and our advertising culture and our chaotic and unexamined emotions encourage us to inhabit.  To learn contemplative practice is to learn what we need so as to live truthfully and honestly and lovingly.  It is a deeply revolutionary matter.In his autobiography Thomas Merton describes an experience not long after he had entered the monastery where he was to spend the rest of his life (Elected Silence, p.303).  He had contracted flu, and was confined to the infirmary for a few days, and, he says, he felt a ‘secret joy’ at the opportunity this gave him for prayer – and ‘to do everything that I want to do, without having to run all over the place answering bells.’  He is forced to recognise that this attitude reveals that ‘All my bad habits…had sneaked into the monastery with me and had received the religious vesture along with me: spiritual gluttony, spiritual sensuality, spiritual pride.’  In other words, he is trying to live the Christian life with the emotional equipment of someone still deeply wedded to the search for individual satisfaction.  It is a powerful warning: we have to be every careful in our evangelisation not simply to persuade people to apply to God and the life of the spirit all the longings for drama, excitement and self-congratulation that we so often indulge in our daily lives.  It was expressed even more forcefully some decades ago by the American scholar of religion, Jacob Needleman, in a controversial and challenging book called Lost Christianity: the words of the Gospel, he says, are addressed to human beings who ‘do not yet exist’.  That is to say, responding in a life-giving way to what the Gospel requires of us means a transforming of our whole self, our feelings and thoughts and imaginings.  To be converted to the faith does not mean simply acquiring a new set of beliefs, but becoming a new person, a person in communion with God and others through Jesus Christ.Contemplation is an intrinsic element in this transforming process.  To learn to look to God without regard to my own instant satisfaction, to learn to scrutinise and to relativise the cravings and fantasies that arise in me – this is to allow God to be God, and thus to allow the prayer of Christ, God’s own relation to God, to come alive in me.  Invoking the Holy Spirit is a matter of asking the third person of the Trinity to enter my spirit and bring the clarity I need to see where I am in slavery to cravings and fantasies and to give me patience and stillness as God’s light and love penetrate my inner life.  Only as this begins to happen will I be delivered from treating the gifts of God as yet another set of things I may acquire to make me happy, or to dominate other people.  And as this process unfolds, I become more free—to borrow a phrase of St Augustine (Confessions IV.7)—to ‘love human beings in a human way’, to love them not for what they may promise me, to love them not as if they were there to provide me with lasting safety and comfort, but as fragile fellow-creatures held in the love of God.  I discover (as we noted earlier) how to see other persons and things for what they are in relation to God, not to me.  And it is here that true justice as well as true love has its roots.The human face that Christians want to show to the world is a face marked by such justice and love, and thus a face formed by contemplation, by the disciplines of silence and the detaching of the self from the objects that enslave it and the unexamined instincts that can deceive it. If evangelisation is a matter of showing the world the ‘unveiled’ human face that reflects the face of the Son turned towards the Father, it must carry with it a serious commitment to promoting and nurturing such prayer and practice.  It should not need saying that this is not at all to argue that ‘internal’ transformation is more important than action for justice; rather, it is to insist that the clarity and energy we need for doing justice requires us to make space for the truth, for God’s reality to come through.  Otherwise our search for justice or for peace becomes another exercise of human will, undermined by human self-deception.  The two callings are inseparable, the calling to ‘prayer and righteous action’, as the Protestant martyr Dietrich Bonhoeffer put it, writing from his prison cell in 1944.  True prayer purifies the motive, true justice is the necessary work of sharing and liberating in others the humanity we have discovered in our contemplative encounter.Those who know little and care less about the institutions and hierarchies of the Church these days are often attracted and challenged by lives that exhibit something of this.  It is the new and renewed religious communities that most effectively reach out to those who have never known belief or who have abandoned it as empty and stale.  When the Christian history of our age is written especially, though not only, as regards Europe and North America—we shall see how central and vital was the witness of places like Taizé or Bose, but also of more traditional communities that have become focal points for the exploration of a humanity broader and deeper than social habit encourages.  And the great spiritual networks, Sant’ Egidio, the Focolare, Communione e Liberazione, these too show the same phenomenon; they make space for a profounder human vision because in their various ways all of them offer a discipline of personal and common life that is about letting the reality of Jesus come alive in us.And, as these examples show, the attraction and challenge we are talking about can generate commitments and enthusiasms across historic confessional lines.  We have become used to talking about the imperative importance of ‘spiritual ecumenism’ these days; but this must not be a matter of somehow opposing the spiritual and the institutional, nor replacing specific commitments with a general sense of Christian fellow-feeling.  If we have a robust and rich account of what the word ‘spiritual’ itself means, grounded in scriptural insights like those in the passages from II Corinthians that we noted earlier, we shall understand spiritual ecumenism as the shared search to nourish and sustain disciplines of contemplation in the hope of unveiling the face of the new humanity.  And the more we keep apart from each other as Christians of different confessions, the less convincing that face will seem.  I mentioned the Focolare movement a moment ago: you will recall that the basic imperative in the spirituality of Chiara Lubich was ‘to make yourself one’ – one with the crucified and abandoned Christ, one through him with the Father, one with all those called to this unity and so one with the deepest needs of the world.  ‘Those who live unity … live by allowing themselves to penetrate always more into God.  They grow always closer to God … and the closer they get to him, the closer they get to the hearts of their brothers and sisters’ (Chiara Lubich: Essential Writings, p.37).  The contemplative habit strips away an unthinking superiority towards other baptised believers and the assumption that I have nothing to learn from them.  Insofar as the habit of contemplation helps us approach all experience as gift, we shall always be asking what it is that the brother or sister has to share with us – even the brother or sister who is in one way or another separated from us or from what we suppose to be the fullness of communion.  ‘Quam bonum et quam jucundum …’.In practice, this might suggest that wherever initiatives are being taken to reach out in new ways to a lapsed Christian or post-Christian public, there should be serious work done on how such outreach can be grounded in some ecumenically shared contemplative practice.  In addition to the striking way in which Taizé has developed an international liturgical ‘culture’ accessible to a great variety of people, a network like the World Community for Christian Meditation, with its strong Benedictine roots and affiliations, has opened up fresh possibilities here.  What is more, this community has worked hard at making contemplative practice accessible to children and young people, and this needs the strongest possible encouragement.  Having seen at first hand—in Anglican schools in Britain—how warmly young children can respond to the invitation offered by meditation in this tradition, I believe its potential for introducing young people to the depths of our faith to be very great indeed.  And for those who have drifted away from the regular practice of sacramental faith, the rhythms and practices of Taizé or the WCCM are often a way back to this sacramental heart and hearth.What people of all ages recognise in these practices is the possibility, quite simply, of living more humanly – living with less frantic acquisitiveness, living with space for stillness, living in the expectation of learning, and most of all, living with an awareness that there is a solid and durable joy to be discovered in the disciplines of self-forgetfulness that is quite different from the gratification of this or that impulse of the moment.  Unless our evangelisation can open the door to all this, it will run the risk of trying to sustain faith on the basis of an un-transformed set of human habits – with the all too familiar result that the Church comes to look unhappily like so many purely human institutions, anxious, busy, competitive and controlling.  In a very important sense, a true enterprise of evangelisation will always be a re-evangelisation of ourselves as Christians also, a rediscovery of why our faith is different, transfiguring – a recovery of our own new humanity.And of course it happens most effectively when we are not planning or struggling for it.  To turn to de Lubac once again, ‘He who will best answer the needs of his time will be someone who will not have first sought to answer them’ (op. cit. pp.111-2); and ‘The man who seeks sincerity, instead of seeking truth in self-forgetfulness, is like the man who seeks to be detached instead of laying himself open in love’ (p.114).  The enemy of all proclamation of the Gospel is self-consciousness, and, by definition, we cannot overcome this by being more self-conscious.  We have to return to St Paul and ask, ‘Where are we looking?’  Do we look anxiously to the problems of our day, the varieties of unfaithfulness or of threat to faith and morals, the weakness of the institution?  Or are we seeking to look to Jesus, to the unveiled face of God’s image in the light of which we see the image further reflected in ourselves and our neighbours?That simply reminds us that evangelisation is always an overflow of something else – the disciple’s journey to maturity in Christ, a journey not organised by the ambitious ego but the result of the prompting and drawing of the Spirit in us.  In our considerations of how we are once again to make the Gospel of Christ compellingly attractive to men and women of our age, I hope we never lose sight of what makes it compelling to ourselves, to each one of us in our diverse ministries.  So I wish you joy in these discussions – not simply clarity or effectiveness in planning, but joy in the promise of the vision of Christ’s face, and in the fore-shadowings of that fulfilment in the joy of communion with each other here and now.©  Rowan Williams 2012 Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 [Lambeth Palace] In the first address by an Archbishop of Canterbury to the Synod of Bishops in Rome, Archbishop Rowan Williams spoke about the profound connection between contemplation and the task of evangelisation, saying it “must be rooted in a profound confidence that we have a distinctive human destiny to show and share with the world”.A contemplative approach is what helps us grow and become fully human by allowing us to open our hearts to God’s wishes:“… contemplation is very far from being just one kind of thing that Christians do:  it is the key to prayer, liturgy, art and ethics, the key to the essence of a renewed humanity that is capable of seeing the world and other subjects in the world with freedom – freedom from self-oriented, acquisitive habits and the distorted understanding that comes from them. To put it boldly, contemplation is the only ultimate answer to the unreal and insane world that our financial systems and our advertising culture and our chaotic and unexamined emotions encourage us to inhabit.  To learn contemplative practice is to learn what we need so as to live truthfully and honestly and lovingly. It is a deeply revolutionary matter.”The Archbishop is in Rome not only for the Synod, but also to take part in celebrations marking the fiftieth anniversary of the opening sessions of the Second Vatican Council, including a Mass on Thursday at St Peter’s.  In the course of his address to the bishops, chaired by Pope Benedict XVI, he said of the Council:“today especially we cannot forget that great gathering that was the Second Vatican Council, which did so much for the health of the Church and helped the Church to recover so much of the energy needed to proclaim the Good News of Jesus Christ effectively in our age.  For so many of my own generation, even beyond the boundaries of the Roman Catholic Church, that Council was a sign of great promise, a sign that the Church was strong enough to ask itself some demanding questions about whether its culture and structures were adequate to the task of sharing the Gospel with the complex, often rebellious, always restless mind of the modern world. … It is not surprising that we are still, fifty years later, struggling with many of the same questions and with the implications of the Council.”The Archbishop emphasized to his Roman Catholic audience the need for evangelisation to be grounded ecumenically:  “the more we keep apart from each other as Christians of different confessions”, the “less convincing” will the face of a renewed humanity seem to our contemporaries.  “In a very important sense, a true enterprise of evangelisation will always be a re-evangelisation of ourselves as Christians also, a rediscovery of why our faith is different, transfiguring – a recovery of our own new humanity.”As part of his final visit to Rome Archbishop Rowan will visit once more the monastery of San Gregorio al Celio, where he celebrated Vespers with the Pope last March.  It is the monastery from which Pope St Gregory the Great sent St Augustine to revive the mission of the Church in Britain and to found the See of Canterbury.  His visit will inaugurate St Gregory’s Chapel as a special focus for unity for Anglican and Roman Catholic pilgrims visiting the tombs of the apostles and martyrs in Rome.The full text of the Archbishop’s address is below: Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Posted Oct 10, 2012 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Archbishop of Canterbury’s address to the Synod of Bishops in Rome Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Archbishop of Canterbury’s Address to the Thirteenth Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops on The New Evangelization for the Transmission of the Christian Faith Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more