Casablanca court sentences newspaper editor to a year in prison and a fine of 88 euros

first_img to go further Help by sharing this information News Hunger strike is last resort for some imprisoned Moroccan journalists News News Organisation June 8, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Reporters Without Borders is dismayed by the one-year jail sentence and fine of 1000 dirhams (88 euros) that a Casablanca court passed today on Rachid Nini, the editor of Al-Massae, one of Morocco’s leading newspapers, at the end of a trial marked by judicial intransigence, repeated adjournments and a refusal to free him on bail.Held since 28 April, the newspaper editor was tried on charges of disinformation and attacking state institutions, public figures and the “security and integrity of the nation and citizens” under articles 263, 264 and 266 of the criminal code.Nini’s lawyer, Khaled Sufiani, said he would appeal. “This is a very bad development for justice and civil liberties in Morocco,” he told Reporters Without Borders. “This is a clear warning to journalists, so that they feel threatened when they exercise their freedom of expression.”“We are alarmed to see criminal charges being brought in a press case,” Reporters Without Borders said. “This precedent opens the way to many abuses and to the withdrawal of the press law as effective legal tool. We urge the Moroccan courts to reverse this decision.”The press freedom organization added: “Three months after King Mohammed spoke of constitutional reforms in an address, the sentence imposed on Rachid Nini is tantamount to a retraction. Imprisoning a journalist is the mark of authoritarian regimes. No progress towards democracy is possible without respect for media freedom.” Reporters Without Borders wrote to the justice minister on 20 May warning against trying Nini without reference to the press law. If journalists are accused of abusing freedom of expression, “any prosecution should be carried out solely under the provisions of Morocco’s press law” and any punishment should be “envisaged by the law, necessary, legitimate and proportionate,” the letter said.Al-Massae journalists told Reporters Without Borders that the prosecution was prompted by articles which criticized corruption, including corruption among close associates of the king, which raised questions about Fouad Ali El-Himma, the head of the Authenticity and Modernity Party, which referred to intelligence chief Abdellatif Hammouchi, and which called for the repeal of the anti-terrorism law. Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa center_img Follow the news on Morocco / Western Sahara Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say June 9, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Casablanca court sentences newspaper editor to a year in prison and a fine of 88 euros April 28, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts News April 15, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

The Catch-22 Facing Young Homebuyers

first_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago  Print This Post The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago May 17, 2016 1,381 Views Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The complex millennial generation stirs up a lot of talk in the mortgage industry, mostly because they have come to be known as the financially unstable and indecisive, renter generation in the housing market. While some of these labels do prove true, this generation is just mostly misunderstood, one analysis found.The remnants of the housing crisis are making difficult for the 18- to 34-year-old cohort to break into homeownership, according to an in-depth analysis by USA TODAY’s Hadley Malcolm.”Young buyers are caught in a quandary. Owning a home has many benefits, including tax breaks and the potential to build value, plus mortgage payments are often lower than rent for a comparable home—especially over the long term,” Malcolm wrote. “But in some cities, rent can be so high that it’s difficult, if not impossible, to save the recommended 20 percent down payment.”Down payments are one barrier that young buyers face in the housing market. According to Zillow data, analyzed by George Petras of USA TODAY, in Los Angeles/Long Beach, California, buyers would need to put 48.8 percent of their monthly income toward a rent payment, while only 39.9 percent of monthly income would go toward a mortgage payment. The same trend continues in other markets like San Francisco; Miami/Fort Lauderdale; and New York/N. New Jersey, where monthly rent payments outpace a monthly mortgage payment, but young buyers are often not able to save a down payment for a home.”There are a lot of places to lay blame, and it’s not just high rents.”USA TodayMalcolm noted that the “challenges presented by the current housing market to first-time buyers have put many on a prolonged path to the American dream.” Even more interesting is the fact that millennials most strongly associate the American Dream with homeownership compared to other generations but less than 10 percent of them actually plan to buy a home in the next year.According to Zillow’s Housing Confidence Index, of millennials, 65.3 percent associate the American Dream with owning a home, but only 9.2 percent of them expect to purchase a home in the next year. Another 7.6 percent indicated that they are not sure about buying a home, while 1.8 percent said they never would.”There are a lot of places to lay blame, and it’s not just high rents. Many point to crushing student debt loads. But the real culprits, say experts, are the housing crisis and the Great Recession, which forced many Americans into foreclosure,” Malcolm said. “Many who didn’t lose their homes found themselves with negative equity — owing more to their lender than a fair market price. This is commonly referred to as being underwater in a mortgage, and when homeowners feel like they are drowning, they tend to stay put. That leads to not enough affordable supply to meet the demand.”Millennial homeownership rates are down to 34.2 percent as the first quarter of 2016 from 39.8 percent in 2009.”Many young people have given up—at least for now. Homeownership rates among people under 35 are on the decline, and it’s not clear when that trend will reverse,” Malcolm penned.Click here to view the full article. Homebuyers Millennials 2016-05-17 Brian Honea in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Tagged with: Homebuyers Millennials About Author: Xhevrije West The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: Third Circuit Court Hands U.S. Bank a Victory Next: DS News Webcast: Wednesday 5/18/2016center_img Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Xhevrije West is a talented writer and editor based in Dallas, Texas. She has worked for a number of publications including The Syracuse New Times, Dallas Flow Magazine, and Bellwethr Magazine. She completed her Bachelors at Alcorn State University and went on to complete her Masters at Syracuse University. Sign up for DS News Daily Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Related Articles The Catch-22 Facing Young Homebuyers Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / The Catch-22 Facing Young Homebuyers Share Save Subscribelast_img read more