Job placements up in November

first_img KCS-content whatsapp Show Comments ▼ Permanent placements and temp billings rose at the fastest rates for three months in November, according to a UK labour market report released today. The Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC) and KPMG Report on Jobs, which draws on recruitment consultancies data, showed three-month highs for both permanent placements and temporary billings, following a previous slowdown. There was an increase in overall job vacancies, though this rise was the slowest for just over a year. Chief executive of REC Kevin Green, said: “The jobs market remains fragile …but confidence does seem to be returning amongst private sector employers.” whatsapp Sharecenter_img Tuesday 7 December 2010 8:32 pm by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastMoneyPailShe Was Famous, Now She Works In {State}MoneyPailSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesPeople TodayNewborn’s Strange Behavior Troubles Mom, 40 Years Later She Finds The Reason Behind ItPeople TodayBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeMagellan TimesThis Is Why The Roy Rogers Museum Has Been Closed For GoodMagellan TimesElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite HeraldHealthyGem”My 600-lb Life” Star Dropped 420 Pounds, See Her NowHealthyGem Job placements up in November More From Our Partners Supermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.org Tags: NULLlast_img read more

National Foods Holdings Limited (NTFD.zw) 2016 Annual Report

first_imgNational Foods Holdings Limited (NTFD.zw) listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange under the Agri-industrial sector has released it’s 2016 annual report.For more information about National Foods Holdings Limited (NTFD.zw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the National Foods Holdings Limited (NTFD.zw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: National Foods Holdings Limited (NTFD.zw)  2016 annual report.Company ProfileNational Foods is Zimbabwe’s largest food manufacturer. The company was established in 1920 and produces a broad range of basic foods including maize meal, flour, cooking oil, margarine, rice, salt, snacks, biscuits, pasta, sugar beans, baked beans, popcorn, as well as soap and a full range of animal feed. Recently, a maize based cereal has been added to the National Foods product portfolio. The company’s iconic and home-grown brands Red Seal, Pearlenta, Gloria, Mahatma, Better Buy, ZimGold, National Foods Stockfeeds, Iris, Zapnax, KING and most recently Allegros Popticorn are loved across the length and breadth of Zimbabwe. Gloria and Red Seal have been trusted and esteemed brands in Zimbabwe for almost a 100 years. The company has 2 major shareholders; Innscor Africa Limited 37.73% and Tiger Brands 37.45%. The National Foods Workers Trust, which was established in 1985 by way of a Donation also owns 9.85% of the company. The beneficiaries of the Trust are the National Foods Ltd non-managerial employees. The company is listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange. National Foods has manufacturing sites in Harare, Bulawayo and Mutare from which it distributes its products throughout Zimbabwe. Our people work passionately to add value to the lives of our customers and consumers through our products; striving to continuously improve our existing products as well as progressively adding new categories to our portfolio. National Foods Holdings Limited is listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Enterprise Group Limited (EGL.gh) Q32017 Interim Report

first_imgEnterprise Group Limited (EGL.gh) listed on the Ghana Stock Exchange under the Insurance sector has released it’s 2017 interim results for the third quarter.For more information about Enterprise Group Limited (EGL.gh) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Enterprise Group Limited (EGL.gh) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Enterprise Group Limited (EGL.gh)  2017 interim results for the third quarter.Company ProfileEnterprise Group Limited is a leading financial services and insurance group in Ghana. The company operates in 6 segments; non-life assurance, life assurance, pension administration, real estate, funeral services and investments. Enterprise Group Limited offers an extensive portfolio of products and services ranging from funeral finance and family income protection to micro insurance, corporate risk, fidelity guarantee, cash-in-safe, home and personal assets protection and product liability insurance policies. Enterprise Group Limited also assists with pension fund management and real estate development and management. The company was founded in 1924 and its head office is in Accra, Ghana. Enterprise Group Limited is listed on the Ghana Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Umeme Limited (UMME.ke) 2018 Annual Report

first_imgUmeme Limited (UMME.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Energy sector has released it’s 2018 annual report.For more information about Umeme Limited (UMME.ke) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Umeme Limited (UMME.ke) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Umeme Limited (UMME.ke)  2018 annual report.Company ProfileUmeme Limited is a power utility company managing the distribution of electricity, electricity supply and after-sales service in Uganda and power sharing with Africa sub-regions. Its electricity distribution division manages the operation, maintenance, upgrading and expansion of the distribution network in Uganda. It consists of approximately 26 202 kilometres of medium- and low-voltage transmission lines which covers the major towns and cities of Uganda. The electricity supply and after-sales service divisions connect new customers to the distribution network, read meters, bill customers and collect revenue as well as deal with customer complaints, restoring power interruptions, managing customer care and educating customers on saving energy. Umeme Limited targets customers in the domestic, commercial, medium industrial, large industrial and street lighting sectors. Umeme Limited is listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchangelast_img read more

Blantyre Hotels Limited (BHL.mw) HY2019 Interim Report

first_imgBlantyre Hotels Limited (BHL.mw) listed on the Malawi Stock Exchange under the Tourism sector has released it’s 2019 interim results for the half year.For more information about Blantyre Hotels Limited (BHL.mw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Blantyre Hotels Limited (BHL.mw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Blantyre Hotels Limited (BHL.mw)  2019 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileBlantyre Hotels Limited is a holding company operating in the hospitality and tourism sector in Malawi. The company owns and manages Ryalls Hotel in Blantyre, Malawi. Its operations are managed by Protea Hotels of South Africa under a services contract. Ryalls Hotel is the most-technologically advanced hotel in Malawi, offering accommodation for businessman and holidaymakers. Situated in Blantyre, the commercial capital of Malawi and only 15-mintues from Malawi’s international airport; the hotel offers travellers well-appointed accommodation in an upmarket location, full conference and banqueting facilities and a fitness centre. Blantyre Hotels Limited is listed on the Malawi Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Wales 8-32 Australia: Five talking points

first_imgThe skipper: Sam Warburton was a miss for his breakdown workWithout Sam Warburton and Taulupe Faletau Wales were unable to secure little meaningful possession or, worse still, slow the Wallaby’s ball. Gethin Jenkins was effective as ever at the breakdown but you can’t expect a prop who will regularly be the last player to leave a scrum, lineout and maul to be the first or second player to get to the breakdown and especially not for 80 minutes. Wales need Faletau and more specifically Warburton back immediately.No offload gameThe majority of the Southern Hemisphere teams, especially the All Blacks, Argentina and the Wallabies, are playing a modern offload game based on skills – Wales are not. The Wallaby backline made twelve offloads, Wales half that. During the first half Israel Folau appeared to be playing a different sport such was his ability to step and offload. It’s a major problem for Wales. Currently the Welsh squad is set up for big direct carries, high balls between the 10 metre lines and goal kicking from any ensuing penalties.Space to offload: Israel Folau was one of many Wallaby backs able to offloadAs was apparent on Saturday, and has been for over 2 years, tries are now winning games, not goal kicks. Despite losing at the weekend to a tremendous performance from Ireland (in which they scored five tries), the All Blacks have slaughtered all before them with Beauden Barrett placing the kicking tee (and despite being a magnificent player, goal kicking is not exactly Barrett’s strength). To beat the top four sides in the world, Wales need to start scoring three to four tries a game. This simply isn’t happening. A dark day: Wales endured a punishing 80 minutes against the Wallabies In a desperately disappointing first Autumn outing, Wales were outthought, outfought and outplayed by the Wallabies. Expect the post-mortem to be long and arduous The slowest of slow startsWales have become notoriously sluggish starters in the autumn internationals. However, Wales’ 32 – 8 loss to Australia was beyond sluggish. This was like watching a hungover sloth using a slow cooker. Wales were mastered by an Australian team which largely struggled during The Rugby Championship yet dominated Wales in every department. It took Wales until the 17th minute to register their first forward carry which is truly remarkable in a game in which the core principle is to carry the ball forward. Barring some solid work from Gethin Jenkins, the Wallaby back row owned the breakdown for 80 minutes.Out of the blocks: Reece Hodge scores early on as Wales failed to get startedOn second viewing, some of the Australian ruck ball was so fast that it looked as though my TV was replaying the game on +3. The speed of the Wallaby ball regularly caught Wales’ defensive line out of place and allowed their backline to pour through the Welsh defence. Some of the line breaks were so clean that many Welsh defenders didn’t even have the chance to attempt a tackle. During the first half Wales had just 20% of the territory and 30% of the ball which led to as unbalanced a first half of test rugby as you will ever see. It was a sorry day for all of the Welsh team with the exception of Ross Moriarty, he can hold his head up high – the others may be looking down for the majority of this week.Dummy runners perplexed WalesThe word ‘dummy’ in rugby refers to the player who is made to look as though he is the intended recipient of a pass. On Saturday ‘Dummy’ was a more accurate reflection of the Welsh defenders as they turned 180 degrees to see another Wallaby pour through the middle. Admittedly, the last minute change of Scott Williams for Jon Davies will have affected the Welsh defence, but not to a huge degree – Williams is a very good test centre and a very solid defender.Finding the gaps: The Wallaby strike runners perplexed the Welsh defenceThe speed of the Wallaby’s ruck ball meant that a simple dummy, or screen, left even warrior-like defenders like Jamie Roberts baffled. Every Wallaby line break and try left the Welsh backline looking at each other with blank expressions as though they had been zapped by that memory loss gun from ‘Men in Black’. Except on this occasion it was men in gold who caused the blank expressions.Wales missed Sam WarburtonI have a new smart phone which actually allows me to change the TV channel on any TV in my house. It’s amazing. But it’s not its primary function and it isn’t the reason that it was selected. And it’s the same for open-side flankers. Many forget that for outside backs or other back row forwards to make flashy 30 yards breaks in the wider channels somebody has had to take 30 shoulders to the face in order to win that ball in the first place. TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Moriarty is here to stayWhen the dark stares and even darker words are delivered in the Welsh camp this week, they will not be aimed at Ross Moriarty. He was, by some distance, Wales’ best performer. This will come as no surprise to any Gloucester supporters who will have seen the eight/ blindside deliver test performances for his club this season.All action: Ross Moriarty was one of the few standouts for WalesHe was the pack’s leading ball carrier, with metres gained not merely number of carries, joint top in the entire squad for defenders beaten and the top tackler with 18. It was a determined performance amongst what was largely dreck. In a squad of test veterans it was the relative newcomer who didn’t panic in the face of overwhelming possession and territorial numbers. The status quo of the Welsh back row can no longer remain – even when all are fit, Moriarty must start.last_img read more

Archbishop of Canterbury’s address to the Synod of Bishops in…

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Archbishop of Canterbury, Tags Ecumenical & Interreligious Featured Events Your Holiness, Reverend Fathers,brothers and sisters in Christ – dear FriendsI am deeply honoured by the Holy Father’s invitation to speak in this gathering:  as the Psalmist says, ‘Ecce quam bonum et quam jucundum habitare fratres in unum’.  The gathering of bishops in Synod for the good of all Christ’s people is one of those disciplines that sustain the health of Christ’s Church.  And today especially we cannot forget that great gathering of ‘fratres in unum’ that was the Second Vatican Council, which did so much for the health of the Church and helped the Church to recover so much of the energy needed to proclaim the Good News of Jesus Christ effectively in our age.  For so many of my own generation, even beyond the boundaries of the Roman Catholic Church, that Council was a sign of great promise, a sign that the Church was strong enough to ask itself some demanding questions about whether its culture and structures were adequate to the task of sharing the Gospel with the complex, often rebellious, always restless mind of the modern world.The Council was, in so many ways, a rediscovery of evangelistic concern and passion, focused not only on the renewal of the Church’s own life but on its credibility in the world.  Texts such as Lumen gentium and Gaudium et spes laid out a fresh and joyful vision of how the unchanging reality of Christ living in his Body on earth through the gift of the Holy Spirit might speak in new words to the society of our age and even to those of other faiths.  It is not surprising that we are still, fifty years later, struggling with many of the same questions and with the implications of the Council; and I take it that this Synod’s concern with the new evangelization is part of that continuing exploration of the Council’s legacy.But one of the most important aspects of the theology of the second Vaticanum was a renewal of Christian anthropology.  In place of an often strained and artificial neo-scholastic account of how grace and nature were related in the constitution of human beings, the Council built on the greatest insights of a theology that had returned to earlier and richer sources – the theology of spiritual geniuses like Henri de Lubac, who reminded us of what it meant for early and mediaeval Christianity to speak of humanity as made in God’s image and of grace as perfecting and transfiguring that image so long overlaid by our habitual ‘inhumanity’.  In such a light, to proclaim the Gospel is to proclaim that it is at last possible to be properly human:  the Catholic and Christian faith is a ‘true humanism’, to borrow a phrase from another genius of the last century, Jacques Maritain.Yet de Lubac is clear what this does not mean.  We do not replace the evangelistic task by a campaign of ‘humanization’.  ‘Humanize before Christianizing?’ he asks – ‘If the enterprise succeeds, Christianity will come too late: its place will be taken.  And who thinks that Christianity has no humanizing value?’  So de Lubac writes in his wonderful collection of aphorisms, Paradoxes of Faith.  It is the faith itself that shapes the work of humanizing and the humanizing enterprise will be empty without the definition of humanity given in the Second Adam.  Evangelization, old or new, must be rooted in a profound confidence that we have a distinctive human destiny to show and share with the world.  There are many ways of spelling this out, but in these brief remarks I want to concentrate on one aspect in particular.To be fully human is to be recreated in the image of Christ’s humanity;  and that humanity is the perfect human ‘translation’ of the relationship of the eternal Son to the eternal Father, a relationship of loving and adoring self-giving, a pouring out of life towards the Other.  Thus the humanity we are growing into in the Spirit, the humanity that we seek to share with the world as the fruit of Christ’s redeeming work, is a contemplative humanity.  St Edith Stein observed that we begin to understand theology when we see God as the ‘First Theologian’, the first to speak out the reality of divine life, because ‘all speaking about God presupposes God’s own speaking’; in an analogous way we could say that we begin to understand contemplation when we see God as the first contemplative, the eternal paradigm of that selfless attention to the Other that brings not death but life to the self.  All contemplating of God presupposes God’s own absorbed and joyful knowing of himself and gazing upon himself in the trinitarian life.To be contemplative as Christ is contemplative is to be open to all the fullness that the Father wishes to pour into our hearts.  With our minds made still and ready to receive, with our self-generated fantasies about God and ourselves reduced to silence, we are at last at the point where we may begin to grow.  And the face we need to show to our world is the face of a humanity in endless growth towards love, a humanity so delighted and engaged by the glory of what we look towards that we are prepared to embark on a journey without end to find our way more deeply into it, into the heart of the trinitarian life.  St Paul speaks (in II Cor 3.18) of how ‘with our unveiled faces reflecting the glory of the Lord’, we are transfigured with a greater and greater radiance.  That is the face we seek to show to our fellow-human beings.And we seek this not because we are in search of some private ‘religious experience’ that will make us feel secure or holy.  We seek it because in this self-forgetting gazing towards the light of God in Christ we learn how to look at one another and at the whole of God’s creation.  In the early Church, there was a clear understanding that we needed to advance from the self-understanding or self-contemplation that taught us to discipline our greedy instincts and cravings to the ‘natural contemplation’ that perceived and venerated the wisdom of God in the order of the world and allowed us to see created reality for what it truly was in the sight of God – rather than what it was in terms of how we might use it or dominate it.  And from there grace would lead us forward into true ‘theology’, the silent gazing upon God that is the goal of all our discipleship.In this perspective, contemplation is very far from being just one kind of thing that Christians do: it is the key to prayer, liturgy, art and ethics, the key to the essence of a renewed humanity that is capable of seeing the world and other subjects in the world with freedom – freedom from self-oriented, acquisitive habits and the distorted understanding that comes from them.  To put it boldly, contemplation is the only ultimate answer to the unreal and insane world that our financial systems and our advertising culture and our chaotic and unexamined emotions encourage us to inhabit.  To learn contemplative practice is to learn what we need so as to live truthfully and honestly and lovingly.  It is a deeply revolutionary matter.In his autobiography Thomas Merton describes an experience not long after he had entered the monastery where he was to spend the rest of his life (Elected Silence, p.303).  He had contracted flu, and was confined to the infirmary for a few days, and, he says, he felt a ‘secret joy’ at the opportunity this gave him for prayer – and ‘to do everything that I want to do, without having to run all over the place answering bells.’  He is forced to recognise that this attitude reveals that ‘All my bad habits…had sneaked into the monastery with me and had received the religious vesture along with me: spiritual gluttony, spiritual sensuality, spiritual pride.’  In other words, he is trying to live the Christian life with the emotional equipment of someone still deeply wedded to the search for individual satisfaction.  It is a powerful warning: we have to be every careful in our evangelisation not simply to persuade people to apply to God and the life of the spirit all the longings for drama, excitement and self-congratulation that we so often indulge in our daily lives.  It was expressed even more forcefully some decades ago by the American scholar of religion, Jacob Needleman, in a controversial and challenging book called Lost Christianity: the words of the Gospel, he says, are addressed to human beings who ‘do not yet exist’.  That is to say, responding in a life-giving way to what the Gospel requires of us means a transforming of our whole self, our feelings and thoughts and imaginings.  To be converted to the faith does not mean simply acquiring a new set of beliefs, but becoming a new person, a person in communion with God and others through Jesus Christ.Contemplation is an intrinsic element in this transforming process.  To learn to look to God without regard to my own instant satisfaction, to learn to scrutinise and to relativise the cravings and fantasies that arise in me – this is to allow God to be God, and thus to allow the prayer of Christ, God’s own relation to God, to come alive in me.  Invoking the Holy Spirit is a matter of asking the third person of the Trinity to enter my spirit and bring the clarity I need to see where I am in slavery to cravings and fantasies and to give me patience and stillness as God’s light and love penetrate my inner life.  Only as this begins to happen will I be delivered from treating the gifts of God as yet another set of things I may acquire to make me happy, or to dominate other people.  And as this process unfolds, I become more free—to borrow a phrase of St Augustine (Confessions IV.7)—to ‘love human beings in a human way’, to love them not for what they may promise me, to love them not as if they were there to provide me with lasting safety and comfort, but as fragile fellow-creatures held in the love of God.  I discover (as we noted earlier) how to see other persons and things for what they are in relation to God, not to me.  And it is here that true justice as well as true love has its roots.The human face that Christians want to show to the world is a face marked by such justice and love, and thus a face formed by contemplation, by the disciplines of silence and the detaching of the self from the objects that enslave it and the unexamined instincts that can deceive it. If evangelisation is a matter of showing the world the ‘unveiled’ human face that reflects the face of the Son turned towards the Father, it must carry with it a serious commitment to promoting and nurturing such prayer and practice.  It should not need saying that this is not at all to argue that ‘internal’ transformation is more important than action for justice; rather, it is to insist that the clarity and energy we need for doing justice requires us to make space for the truth, for God’s reality to come through.  Otherwise our search for justice or for peace becomes another exercise of human will, undermined by human self-deception.  The two callings are inseparable, the calling to ‘prayer and righteous action’, as the Protestant martyr Dietrich Bonhoeffer put it, writing from his prison cell in 1944.  True prayer purifies the motive, true justice is the necessary work of sharing and liberating in others the humanity we have discovered in our contemplative encounter.Those who know little and care less about the institutions and hierarchies of the Church these days are often attracted and challenged by lives that exhibit something of this.  It is the new and renewed religious communities that most effectively reach out to those who have never known belief or who have abandoned it as empty and stale.  When the Christian history of our age is written especially, though not only, as regards Europe and North America—we shall see how central and vital was the witness of places like Taizé or Bose, but also of more traditional communities that have become focal points for the exploration of a humanity broader and deeper than social habit encourages.  And the great spiritual networks, Sant’ Egidio, the Focolare, Communione e Liberazione, these too show the same phenomenon; they make space for a profounder human vision because in their various ways all of them offer a discipline of personal and common life that is about letting the reality of Jesus come alive in us.And, as these examples show, the attraction and challenge we are talking about can generate commitments and enthusiasms across historic confessional lines.  We have become used to talking about the imperative importance of ‘spiritual ecumenism’ these days; but this must not be a matter of somehow opposing the spiritual and the institutional, nor replacing specific commitments with a general sense of Christian fellow-feeling.  If we have a robust and rich account of what the word ‘spiritual’ itself means, grounded in scriptural insights like those in the passages from II Corinthians that we noted earlier, we shall understand spiritual ecumenism as the shared search to nourish and sustain disciplines of contemplation in the hope of unveiling the face of the new humanity.  And the more we keep apart from each other as Christians of different confessions, the less convincing that face will seem.  I mentioned the Focolare movement a moment ago: you will recall that the basic imperative in the spirituality of Chiara Lubich was ‘to make yourself one’ – one with the crucified and abandoned Christ, one through him with the Father, one with all those called to this unity and so one with the deepest needs of the world.  ‘Those who live unity … live by allowing themselves to penetrate always more into God.  They grow always closer to God … and the closer they get to him, the closer they get to the hearts of their brothers and sisters’ (Chiara Lubich: Essential Writings, p.37).  The contemplative habit strips away an unthinking superiority towards other baptised believers and the assumption that I have nothing to learn from them.  Insofar as the habit of contemplation helps us approach all experience as gift, we shall always be asking what it is that the brother or sister has to share with us – even the brother or sister who is in one way or another separated from us or from what we suppose to be the fullness of communion.  ‘Quam bonum et quam jucundum …’.In practice, this might suggest that wherever initiatives are being taken to reach out in new ways to a lapsed Christian or post-Christian public, there should be serious work done on how such outreach can be grounded in some ecumenically shared contemplative practice.  In addition to the striking way in which Taizé has developed an international liturgical ‘culture’ accessible to a great variety of people, a network like the World Community for Christian Meditation, with its strong Benedictine roots and affiliations, has opened up fresh possibilities here.  What is more, this community has worked hard at making contemplative practice accessible to children and young people, and this needs the strongest possible encouragement.  Having seen at first hand—in Anglican schools in Britain—how warmly young children can respond to the invitation offered by meditation in this tradition, I believe its potential for introducing young people to the depths of our faith to be very great indeed.  And for those who have drifted away from the regular practice of sacramental faith, the rhythms and practices of Taizé or the WCCM are often a way back to this sacramental heart and hearth.What people of all ages recognise in these practices is the possibility, quite simply, of living more humanly – living with less frantic acquisitiveness, living with space for stillness, living in the expectation of learning, and most of all, living with an awareness that there is a solid and durable joy to be discovered in the disciplines of self-forgetfulness that is quite different from the gratification of this or that impulse of the moment.  Unless our evangelisation can open the door to all this, it will run the risk of trying to sustain faith on the basis of an un-transformed set of human habits – with the all too familiar result that the Church comes to look unhappily like so many purely human institutions, anxious, busy, competitive and controlling.  In a very important sense, a true enterprise of evangelisation will always be a re-evangelisation of ourselves as Christians also, a rediscovery of why our faith is different, transfiguring – a recovery of our own new humanity.And of course it happens most effectively when we are not planning or struggling for it.  To turn to de Lubac once again, ‘He who will best answer the needs of his time will be someone who will not have first sought to answer them’ (op. cit. pp.111-2); and ‘The man who seeks sincerity, instead of seeking truth in self-forgetfulness, is like the man who seeks to be detached instead of laying himself open in love’ (p.114).  The enemy of all proclamation of the Gospel is self-consciousness, and, by definition, we cannot overcome this by being more self-conscious.  We have to return to St Paul and ask, ‘Where are we looking?’  Do we look anxiously to the problems of our day, the varieties of unfaithfulness or of threat to faith and morals, the weakness of the institution?  Or are we seeking to look to Jesus, to the unveiled face of God’s image in the light of which we see the image further reflected in ourselves and our neighbours?That simply reminds us that evangelisation is always an overflow of something else – the disciple’s journey to maturity in Christ, a journey not organised by the ambitious ego but the result of the prompting and drawing of the Spirit in us.  In our considerations of how we are once again to make the Gospel of Christ compellingly attractive to men and women of our age, I hope we never lose sight of what makes it compelling to ourselves, to each one of us in our diverse ministries.  So I wish you joy in these discussions – not simply clarity or effectiveness in planning, but joy in the promise of the vision of Christ’s face, and in the fore-shadowings of that fulfilment in the joy of communion with each other here and now.©  Rowan Williams 2012 Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 [Lambeth Palace] In the first address by an Archbishop of Canterbury to the Synod of Bishops in Rome, Archbishop Rowan Williams spoke about the profound connection between contemplation and the task of evangelisation, saying it “must be rooted in a profound confidence that we have a distinctive human destiny to show and share with the world”.A contemplative approach is what helps us grow and become fully human by allowing us to open our hearts to God’s wishes:“… contemplation is very far from being just one kind of thing that Christians do:  it is the key to prayer, liturgy, art and ethics, the key to the essence of a renewed humanity that is capable of seeing the world and other subjects in the world with freedom – freedom from self-oriented, acquisitive habits and the distorted understanding that comes from them. To put it boldly, contemplation is the only ultimate answer to the unreal and insane world that our financial systems and our advertising culture and our chaotic and unexamined emotions encourage us to inhabit.  To learn contemplative practice is to learn what we need so as to live truthfully and honestly and lovingly. It is a deeply revolutionary matter.”The Archbishop is in Rome not only for the Synod, but also to take part in celebrations marking the fiftieth anniversary of the opening sessions of the Second Vatican Council, including a Mass on Thursday at St Peter’s.  In the course of his address to the bishops, chaired by Pope Benedict XVI, he said of the Council:“today especially we cannot forget that great gathering that was the Second Vatican Council, which did so much for the health of the Church and helped the Church to recover so much of the energy needed to proclaim the Good News of Jesus Christ effectively in our age.  For so many of my own generation, even beyond the boundaries of the Roman Catholic Church, that Council was a sign of great promise, a sign that the Church was strong enough to ask itself some demanding questions about whether its culture and structures were adequate to the task of sharing the Gospel with the complex, often rebellious, always restless mind of the modern world. … It is not surprising that we are still, fifty years later, struggling with many of the same questions and with the implications of the Council.”The Archbishop emphasized to his Roman Catholic audience the need for evangelisation to be grounded ecumenically:  “the more we keep apart from each other as Christians of different confessions”, the “less convincing” will the face of a renewed humanity seem to our contemporaries.  “In a very important sense, a true enterprise of evangelisation will always be a re-evangelisation of ourselves as Christians also, a rediscovery of why our faith is different, transfiguring – a recovery of our own new humanity.”As part of his final visit to Rome Archbishop Rowan will visit once more the monastery of San Gregorio al Celio, where he celebrated Vespers with the Pope last March.  It is the monastery from which Pope St Gregory the Great sent St Augustine to revive the mission of the Church in Britain and to found the See of Canterbury.  His visit will inaugurate St Gregory’s Chapel as a special focus for unity for Anglican and Roman Catholic pilgrims visiting the tombs of the apostles and martyrs in Rome.The full text of the Archbishop’s address is below: Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Posted Oct 10, 2012 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Archbishop of Canterbury’s address to the Synod of Bishops in Rome Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Archbishop of Canterbury’s Address to the Thirteenth Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops on The New Evangelization for the Transmission of the Christian Faith Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

Video – Christians in Pakistan: Persecuted yet steadfast in faith

first_img By Matthew DaviesPosted Nov 19, 2013 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Video [Episcopal News Service] On Sept. 22, 2013, two suicide bombers targeted All Saints Anglican Church in Peshawar at the end of a Sunday worship service, killing 127 people and injuring 170. Many of the victims were women and children. Bishop Samuel Azariah of the Diocese of Raiwind, moderator of the Church of Pakistan, says that despite years of intense persecution from religious extremists, the Christian population in Pakistan is resilient and growing in numbers. “Nothing will dampen our spirits. Bombing, murder, burning, shooting will not dampen our spirits and our commitment to Jesus Christ,” he says. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Advocacy Peace & Justice, Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC November 20, 2013 at 10:19 pm We in the United States have no idea of what it is like to worship and be persecuted. I am overwhelmed with the burden to pray for our sisters and brothers in Christ. May God protect you with his shield. Go forth….I respect you beyond belief! Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments (3) Rector Shreveport, LA The Rev. Wilson Nathaniel (Than) Pyron says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Asia, Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York center_img Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Nadeem BHATTI says: Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Dianna Berg says: Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Video – Christians in Pakistan: Persecuted yet steadfast in faith Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY December 5, 2013 at 6:14 pm Prayers support is required for these circumstances & persecution in PakistanI appeal to all dear faithful to write to your governments to stop Aid to Pakistani government, unless they guarantee safety and security to their religious minorities in Pakistan. Early this year a Church in Gujranwala was attacked. Badami Bagh Christian community houses were set on fire. Few years ago there was suicide attack in Islamabad International Church. In 2009 Gojra City Christian houses were set on fire, houses were looted kids, women and men was locked in their houses and set on fire. there were nine causalities. Western countries should immediately accept all Christian families displaced and flew to other countries like Sri Lanka, Thailand and Malaysia to refuge. Nadeem Bhatti for Info write at email: [email protected] Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA November 20, 2013 at 2:21 pm “Come, Lord Jesus, come quickly. Amen.” Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

Houses In Castlewood Avenue / ODOS architects

first_img Houses ArchDaily CopyAbout this officeODOS architectsOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesHousesIrelandPublished on February 06, 2012Cite: “Houses In Castlewood Avenue / ODOS architects” 06 Feb 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – Metropol ClassicVinyl Walls3MVinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ StonePartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Zenith® SeriesPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesProdemaProdEx Wood Facade in the Aspen Art MuseumSealantsSikaRenovation of Zeitz MuseumSinksBradley Corporation USAVerge Coordinated Soap Dispenser and Faucet SetsWoodLunawoodThermo Timber and Industrial ThermowoodAcousticFabriTRAK®FabriFELT™ for Walls and CeilingsGlassDip-TechDigital Ceramic Etch PrintingWindowspanoramah!®ah! Ultra MinimalistEngineered Wood FlooringAustralian Sustainable Hardwoods (ASH)Australian Oak Engineered FlooringLouvers / ShuttersConstruction SpecialtiesSunshades – Airfoil LuxMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Houses In Castlewood Avenue / ODOS architects Ireland “COPY” Save this picture!Courtesy of odos architects+ 13 Share Products used in this ProjectFiber Cements / CementsEQUITONEFiber Cement Facade Panel NaturaText description provided by the architects. The properties at 26 & 27 Castlewood Avenue date back to the early nineteenth century and have changed little externally since then. Both properties had originally been built as semi detached residences and were built on wider than normal plots (17m as oppose to 11m) resulting in their double fronted facades and tri-partite plan arrangement. The space to the sides of both properties has been filled in in pastiche style in recent years. Save this picture!Courtesy of odos architectsBoth properties were in a state of dereliction at the time we were commissioned by our client to oversee their redevelopment. The properties had previously been subdivided into flats (8 in each) and it was our clients intention to restore both properties to single occupancy. The original returns to both properties had been removed by the buildings previous owners and replaced with a haphazzard arrangement of non descript accommodations. At the design analysis stage of the project it was felt there was scope to introduce a “new” architecture to the rears of both properties whilst respecting their historic characteristics. Save this picture!Courtesy of odos architectsThe concept behind the two replacement returns was to analyse the function of return structures to the rear of period dwellings on both a programmatic and a visual level. An attempt was made to establish 2 new buildings, to be considered in their own right, while making a meaningful connection between the past and the present. Both properties were fully restored internally and externally back to their original character with accommodation comprising 4 bedrooms (master bedroom ensuite) and family bathroom at first floor level. Living and Dining accommodation at the upper ground floor level (main entry level). Open plan Kitchen/Dining/Living accommodation and nannys quarters at lower ground floor level. Save this picture!Courtesy of odos architectsThe new returns to both properties contain the following accommodation; Study at upper level (above first floor level), Family bathroom at mid level and hallway access at lower level. The study at upper level is a dramatic space with its monopitched roof structure acting as a light catcher facing south. Views from this space are towards the Dublin mountains and offer those working in the space inspiration. This space captures vast volumes of light which in turn feed into the lower circulation areas below. The structure of these returns is a steel frame vertical structure with timber joist infil. The structures are completely self supporting on independent foundations at the rear of both properties and at high level are not structurally connected to the existing fabric. Each return is independently supported on a bridge structure at the upper garden level. The independent qualities of each structure was seen favourably on a planning conservation level as both structures could be removed without serious implication the the fabric of the original houses. Save this picture!Courtesy of odos architectsThe width of both returns is derived from the width of the upper ground floor hallways to both properties offering a more coherent addition to the historic plan configuration. The angle of pitch to these forms is derived from the existing roof pitches to the main roofs. The rear gardens to 26 & 27 are split over two levels to accommodate the houses split living accommodations at upper and lower ground floor levels. New external paved areas have been designed at lower ground floor levels as extensions of the internal accommodations. Access to these gardens from the upper ground floor level is via a new concrete bridge structure within each garden. Save this picture!Courtesy of odos architectsThe original design concept was for a pair of buildings with a strong form in an attempt to give the previously understated rear of both properties a new definition. This is achieved in a number of different ways including the use of a simple palate of materials such as fibre cement panels (charcoal in colour) and large glazed sections. Save this picture!ElevationFull height Opal laminate glazed sections have been introduced in the bathrooms at a mid level for privacy reasons. Other influences in the design and orientation of the building were in part a direct result of the particular site, structural and somewhat onerous planning and conservation constraints. Both properties are served with geothermal heating (underfloor) and solar heat exchange systems. All downpipes dealing with surface and foul water have been internalised within a central service core ensuring purer elevations and minimizing disruption to the buildings form. These inhabited forms when first seen first create a sense of wonder and curiosity within the viewer not just because of their sculptural form but more for the setting within which they exist.Project gallerySee allShow lessPennDesign 2012 Spring Lecture SeriesArticlesStudent Housing for TU Delft Campus / Studioninedots + HVDNArticles Share Houses In Castlewood Avenue / ODOS architectsSave this projectSaveHouses In Castlewood Avenue / ODOS architectscenter_img Projects Architects: ODOS architects Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Manufacturers: EQUITONE Products translation missing: en-US.post.svg.material_description ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/204106/houses-in-castlewood-avenue-odos-architects Clipboard CopyHouses•Ireland “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/204106/houses-in-castlewood-avenue-odos-architects Clipboardlast_img read more

Survey on international alumni efforts

first_img  22 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Individual giving Research / statistics About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 14 May 2003 | News An American university is asking other universities how they manage their international alumni activities.The International Advancement Programs office at Michigan Technological University is conducting a survey to determine international alumni efforts currently being used. They are seeking input from a range of universities.They say that information provided will be used only in statistical form: “no identifying information will be disclosed publicly.” Advertisementcenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The survey is short, consisting of ten questions. Everyone participating in the survey will receive a copy of the summary report. Survey on international alumni effortslast_img read more